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Boys and Girls Bookshelf; a Practical Plan of Character Building, Volume I (of 17) - Fun and Thought for Little Folk
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Transcriber's note:

Text enclosed by equal signs is underlined (underlined).

Text enclosed by pound (number) signs is in bold face (bold).

This book is heavily illustrated, so illustrations are not denoted in the text file except where captioned, or alluded to in the text.

Inconsistencies in spelling and hyphenation have been retained.



BOYS AND GIRLS BOOKSHELF

A Practical Plan of Character Building

COMPLETE IN SEVENTEEN VOLUMES

I Fun and Thought for Little Folk II Folk-Lore, Fables, and Fairy Tales III Famous Tales and Nature Stories IV Things to Make and Things to Do V True Stories from Every Land VI Famous Songs and Picture Stories VII Nature and Outdoor Life, Part I VIII Nature and Outdoor Life, Part II IX Earth, Sea, and Sky X Games and Handicraft XI Wonders of Invention XII Marvels of Industry XIII Every Land and its Story XIV Famous Men and Women XV Bookland—Story and Verse, Part I XVI Bookland—Story and Verse, Part II XVII Graded and Classified Index

THE UNIVERSITY SOCIETY INCORPORATED New York







BOYS AND GIRLS BOOKSHELF

A Practical Plan of Character Building

Little Folks' Section

Prepared Under the Supervision of THE EDITORIAL BOARD of the UNIVERSITY SOCIETY

Volume I FUN AND THOUGHT FOR LITTLE FOLK

THE UNIVERSITY SOCIETY INCORPORATED New York



Copyright, 1920, By THE UNIVERSITY SOCIETY INC.

Copyright, 1912, 1915, By THE UNIVERSITY SOCIETY INC.

Manufactured in the U. S. A.



THE EDITORIAL BOARD OF THE UNIVERSITY SOCIETY INC.

General Editor: WILLIAM BYRON FORBUSH, PH.D., LITT.D. Author of "The Boy Problem"

Technical Editor: HERBERT TREADWELL WADE Technical Editor of The New International Encyclopedia

Literature Editor: ROSSITER JOHNSON, PH.D., LL.D. Editor of "Little Classics"

Music Editor: WINTON JAMES BALTZELL, A.B., MUS. BAC. Secretary of The National Academy of Music

Associate Editor: DANIEL EDWIN WHEELER Editorial Director of the Edison Industries

Office Editor: JENNIE ELLIS BURDICK Editor of "The Children's Own Library"

PARTIAL LIST OF SPECIAL CONTRIBUTORS

JOSEPH H. ADAMS, Editor of "Harper's Practical Books for Boys"

T. GEORGE ALLEN, Curator of the Oriental Museum, University of Chicago

MARY W. ARTOIS, Traveler and Writer

ROGER W. BABSON, Author of "Central America"

GRACE GERTRUDE BARDEN, Teacher of Domestic Science

HARRY K. BEASLEY, Electrical Engineer and Author

C. S. BRAININ, Ph.D., Professor of Astronomy, Columbia University

M. ALSTON BUCKLEY, Retold Tales and Fact Articles

FRANK H. CHELEY, Editor of the "Father and Son Library"

LAURA CLARKE, Author of Fact Articles

CARL HARRY CLAUDY, Author of "First Book of Photography"

JOHN H. CLIFFORD, Associate-Editor of "The Young Folks' Treasury," "The Mother's Book," etc.

CLAYTON S. COOPER Author of "Understanding South America"

LEE S. CRANDALL, Curator, New York Zoological Park

WALTER ALDEN DYER, Author and former Managing Editor of Country Life in America

WILLIAM H. EASTON, Ph.D., Publicity Department of the Westinghouse Electric and Manufacturing Co.

ARTHUR ELSON, Musical Critic and Author of "The Book of Musical Knowledge"

PHILIP D. FAGANS, Executive Secretary of the Woodcraft League

JOHN CLARKE FARBER, A.M., Lieutenant, United States National Army

LOUISE MAUNSELL FIELD, Fiction Reviewer of The New York Times

EHRMA G. FILER, Fact Articles

HUGO FROELICH AND BONNIE E. SNOW, Authors of "Industrial Art" textbooks

JULIA A. GLEASON, Teacher of Sewing, Cornell University

WILLIAM ELLIOT GRIFFIS, D.D., L.H.D., Lecturer and Author

ISABEL F. HAPGOOD, Author of "Russian Rambles"

HILDEGARDE HAWTHORNE, Author and Critic

ROSE HENDERSON, Biographer and Travel Writer

HENRY WALTON JONES, Fact Articles

GRACE LEE KNELL, Teacher of Manual Training, Ridgewood, N.J., Schools

O. IVAN LEE, Analytical Chemist

CHARLES HENRY LERRIGO, M.D., Former President of the Kansas State Board of Health

HARRIS W. MOORE, Author of "Manual Training Toys"

JOHN T. NICHOLS, Curator of Fish at the American Museum of Natural History

T. GILBERT PEARSON, Executive Secretary of the National Association of Audubon Societies

E. L. D. SEYMOUR, Farm Editor of Country Life

MORGAN SHEPARD (JOHN MARTIN), Writer of Illustrated Letters to Children

ROBERT W. SHUFELDT, M.D., U.S.M.C., Head of the Science Bureau, Washington, D. C.

ELVA S. SMITH, Children's Librarian of the Carnegie Library, Pittsburgh

MABELL SHIPPIE CLARKE SMITH, Author and Lecturer

MARY V. WORSTELL, Author, Editor, and Lecturer

KATHARINE S. WORTHINGTON, Teacher of English in the Finch School

PARTIAL LIST OF AUTHORS REPRESENTED IN THE BOYS AND GIRLS BOOKSHELF BY SELECTIONS FROM THEIR WRITINGS

FREDERICK UPHAM ADAMS, Mechanical Engineer and Author

ROALD AMUNDSEN, Leader of the Norwegian Polar Expedition which reached the South Pole

HANS CHRISTIAN ANDERSEN, Danish Poet and Fabulist

CAROLYN SHERWIN BAILEY, Writer of Stories and Books for Children and Young Folks

RALPH HENRY BARBOUR, Author of "The Crimson Sweater" and other books for boys

L. FRANK BAUM, Author of "The Wizard of Oz," "Queen Zixie of Ix" and other children's books

ALEXANDER GRAHAM BELL, Ph.D., M.D., Sc.D., Scientist and Inventor

JOHN STUART BLACKIE, Scottish Scholar and Man-of-letters

RICHARD DODDRIDGE BLACKMORE, English Novelist

JOHN HENRY BONER, Editor and Poet

ELBRIDGE STREETER BROOKS, Author of "Historic Boys" and "Historic Girls"

WINIFRED BUCK, Author of "The American Girl"

GELETT BURGESS, Draughtsman and Author

THORNTON WALDO BURGESS, Author of "Old Mother West Wind"

ELIZABETH BARRETT BROWNING, Poet

ROBERT BROWNING, Poet

ROBERT BURNS, Poet

CHARLES H. CAFFIN, Author of "A Guide to Pictures"

CHARLES DICKENS, Novelist

MARY MAPES DODGE, Author and Editor

NATHAN HASKELL DOLE, Author of "Young Folks' History of Russia," etc.

ALEXANDRE DUMAS, Novelist

M. S. EMERY, Author of "How to Enjoy Pictures"

EUGENE FIELD, Poet

WILLIAM LOVELL FINLEY, State Biologist of Oregon

EDWARD HOWE FORBUSH, State Ornithologist of Massachusetts

MARY E. WILKINS FREEMAN, Novelist

MATTHEW PAGE GAFFNEY, Headmaster of the Roger Ascham School

REV. WASHINGTON GLADDEN, Author of "Santa Claus on a Lark," "Social Salvation," etc.

JOEL CHANDLER HARRIS, Author of "Uncle Remus Stories"

ELIZABETH HARRISON, President of the National Kindergarten College

NATHANIEL HAWTHORNE, Novelist

CHARLES FREDERICK HOLDER, Author of "Big Game Fish of the United States"

VICTOR HUGO, Poet and Novelist

FREDERICK WINTHROP HUTCHINSON, Author of "The Men Who Found America"

JEAN INGELOW, Poet and Novelist

WASHINGTON IRVING, Historian, Essayist, and Novelist

TUDOR JENKS, Author of "Boys' Book of Explorations," "Electricity for Young People," etc.

CHARLES KINGSLEY, Clergyman and Author

GUSTAVE KOBBE, Author of "Wagner's Music Dramas Analyzed"

CHARLES LAMB, Critic, Humorist, and Author

SIDNEY LANIER, Poet and Critic

EDMUND LEAMY, Author of "The Golden Spears"

MAUD McKNIGHT LINDSAY, Author of "Mother Stories"

HENRY W. LONGFELLOW, Poet

SILAS ALPHA LOTTRIDGE, Author of "Animal Snapshots and How Made"

FREDERIC A. LUCAS, Director of the American Museum of Natural History

INEZ N. McFEE, Author of "Tales of Common Things"

PETER MacQUEEN, Lecturer and Author of "Around the World With the Flag"

JOHN MILTON, Poet

ALFRED NOYES, Poet

ALBERT BIGELOW PAINE, Author of "The Van Dwellers," "Mark Twain" and other works

GIFFORD PINCHOT, Systematic Forester

EMILIE POULSSON, Author of "Finger Plays"

LAURA ELIZABETH RICHARDS, Author of the "Hildegarde" Books and "The Golden Windows"

JAMES WHITCOMB RILEY, Poet

JOHN RUSKIN, Art Critic and Writer

SIR WALTER SCOTT, Novelist and Poet

ANNA SEWELL Novelist

ROBERT W. SERVICE, Author of "The Spell of the Yukon"

ERNEST THOMPSON SETON, Artist, Author, and Lecturer

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE, Poet and Dramatist

PERCY BYSSHE SHELLEY, Poet

VILHJALMUR STEFANSSON, Arctic Explorer

ROBERT LOUIS STEVENSON, Poet, Essayist, and Novelist

ALFRED, LORD TENNYSON, Poet

MRS. GUDRUN THORNE-THOMSEN, Author of "East o' the Sun and West o' the Moon," and other Norwegian Folk Tales

EVERETT TITSWORTH TOMLINSON, Ph.D., L.H.D., Author of "Three Young Continentals"

CAROLYN WELLS, Author of "A Nonsense Anthology" and the "Marjorie" Books

JOHN GREENLEAF WHITTIER, Poet and Author

LEONARD WOOD, Major-General, United States Army

ORVILLE WRIGHT, Aviator and Inventor

PARTIAL LIST OF ILLUSTRATORS Examples of whose work appear in the BOYS AND GIRLS BOOKSHELF

JOHN W. ALEXANDER F. S. CHURCH LUCY FITCH PERKINS ANNIE ANDERSON CLYDE O. DELAND HOWARD PYLE FLORENCE ANDERSON EDMUND DULAC ARTHUR RACKHAM CULMER BARNES RUTH HALLOCK FREDERICK REMINGTON FRANK L. BAUM FLORENCE HARRISON F. REUTERDAHL J. CARTER BEARD R. BRUCE HORSFALL HARRY ROUNTREE W. T. BENDA GEORGE W. JOY CARL RUNGIUS JOHN BENNETT E. W. KEMBLE EDMUND J. SAWYER ANNA WHELAN BETTS EMILIE BENSON KNIPE ERNEST THOMPSON SETON R. B. BIRCH CHARLES F. LESTER R. SHRADOR E. H. BLASHFIELD J. C. LEYENDECKER HAROLD SICHEL R. I. BRASHER H. MOORE HUGH SPENCER PAMELA VINTON BROWN H. A. OGDEN ALICE BARBER STEPHENS HARRISON CADY MONRO S. ORR FRANK STICK BESS BRUCE CLEVELAND MAXFIELD PARRISH SARA S. STILLWELL F. Y. CORY MALCOLM PATTERSON C. R. SWAN LILIAN A. COVEY E. C. PEIXOTTO ALBERTINE RANDALL WHEELAN



GENERAL INTRODUCTION

Books are as essentially a part of the home where boys and girls are growing into manhood and womanhood as any other part of the furnishings. Parents have no more right to starve a child's mind than they have his body. If a child is to take his place among the men and women of his time he needs to know the past out of which the present grew, and he needs to know what is going on in the world in which he lives. He needs tools for his brain as much as for his hands. All these things are found, and found only, in books.

The child is helpless to provide himself with these necessaries for life. The majority of parents are eager that their children shall start early and right on that road which leads to honorable success. But it is impossible for any parent, by no matter how liberal an expenditure, to collect books that shall adequately cover all a child's needs and interests. This is the task of experts.

INSTRUCTIVE PLAY

Recent studies of childhood have emphasized the conviction that a child develops his talents even more in his playtime than in his school; his spontaneous activities build up his fourfold—physical, mental, social, and moral—nature. Probably no collection of books has been more strongly affected by this modern discovery than the BOYS AND GIRLS BOOKSHELF. The whole effort has been to utilize the child's play-interests so that they shall express themselves in joyous ways that lead into the world of invention and industry, of imagination and achievement, of science and art and music, of character and worth-while deeds.

Children's collections have had various literary styles. The encyclopedia is comprehensive, but stately and often dull; it will answer the question of the child, but it does not lead the child toward more knowledge. The scrapbook is interesting, but it has no plan or order. The "inspirational" book is full of fine sentiments, but without facts or much information.

THE PURPOSE OF THE BOOKSHELF

The BOOKSHELF is so built that it creates a desire for knowledge, and then satisfies that desire. At the same time the BOOKSHELF does not pretend to tell all that is known on any one subject. The Editors have selected the subjects concerning which no one should be ignorant, and have seen to it that the information is given in an attractive form with plenty of illustrative material, and that when the reader is finished he will have a working knowledge of the subject. To awaken minds and to make them alert and receptive has been the aim in making the BOOKSHELF.

THE PLAN AND SCOPE

The BOOKSHELF begins with the dawn of intelligence in the child, and goes with him through the morning of childhood, and into the noonday of youth. It contains a complete stock of finger-plays, action-plays, lullabies, and other entertaining and educational material enjoyable to babies and little children; it reaches into and through the high-school age. In fact, the BOOKSHELF, with its valuable scientific and natural-history material, its information about inventions and industries, and its literary treasures, is an asset to the library even of an adult.

The BOOKSHELF is classified. In some libraries material upon an unrelated variety of subjects may be found within the covers of a single volume. This feature has been tried and found wanting. It means that when the reader is on the trail of a given subject he never knows where to look for it, and he is likely to have to hunt through several volumes before he learns what he wants to know. The argument for an unclassified library is that the child who is reading a story may happen at the end of that story upon an article containing valuable information, and thus be lured on to read it. Children are not so easily beguiled. The mental distinction of being, as it were, forced to spring from one theme to another certainly counterbalances any supposed advantage in the scrapbook arrangement. "A place for everything, and everything in its place," is as true an adage and as necessary to remember and to practise to-day as it ever was.

In addition to classifying the contents of the BOOKSHELF, the Editors have graded the material. Any collection that is purchased for a home and leaves out the needs of the children of any given age is disappointing to that home. There is also a Graded Index, which is an enlargement upon the general plan.

On the very day of its birth a baby enters the child's garden of life. In this beautiful place there are weeds as well as flowers, and father and mother must guide the little adventurer so that only the good flowers are developed, while the weeds are held in check and the poisonous plants torn up and destroyed. Earnest parents feel this responsibility very keenly. In "Fun and Thought for Little Folk" there is a well-selected collection of jingles, stories, and play exercises for babies up to about three or four years of age. It covers the earliest informal education of a child, from finger-play days to the alphabet period. It helps parents who wish to enjoy their little children and who do not wish such enjoyment to be a mere matter of chance. Trained kindergartners with the modern viewpoint had much to do with this collection. Not only does it delight the little folk, but it is also the first material for child-training.

Educators are making much nowadays of fairy stories and wonder-tales. The imaginative man, they say, is the effective man, because he has the mental vision which sees farther than the physical eye; and they urge that all children should be the possessors of these nursery tales that have made children happy for so many centuries. "Folk-lore, Fables, and Fairy Tales" is the result of careful comparative study of all the leading anthologies, with added research into sources that have not otherwise been thoroughly explored.

The folk-lore of many races and times has been sifted, and wherever necessary it has been retold so as to be suitable to modern tastes and needs of modern children. Whatever was gruesome or morally undesirable has been omitted, but the flavor and the language of the past have been retained. Here are "Cinderella," "Tom Thumb," and all the other favorites of our childhood days, together with the stories that are told to the children in the four corners of the world. While these will be read to our boys and girls before they are able to read for themselves, they will turn back again and again to this department as they grow older. There is perpetual youth in the tales evolved by a race in its infancy.

From the fairy-tale and the folk-lore period, when beasts and trees and all that is about them speak to them in words they can understand, children develop into a stage where they want stories, or, as we say when we are older, fiction. Both they and we mean tales that while untrue yet would be possible of happening. At this age, also, children desire to learn the habits of the animals they see on the farm, in the zoo, and in the circus. The importance of giving children an early acquaintance with good literature is unquestioned, but even the most earnest parent has difficulty in making the selection, finding the source in available form, and keeping out what is unworthy.

"Famous Tales and Nature Stories" has been made with care. Many of the world's famous stories are collected here, and wherever possible they are in the original language. The nature stories, about flowers and trees, birds and insects, are not formal, but are planned to give the child direct contact with nature and to assist the good habit of direct and interested observation.

This division also includes a Primer and a First Reader, made according to modern principles. Enough reading material is furnished in graded form to enable the home teacher to help her little pupil master the elements of reading, or the child will use it himself to supplement the work of the teacher in school, if the mother is too busy with her other tasks to permit her the enjoyment of teaching her child to read.

All modern kindergarten teaching to-day centers about the development of the child's own impulses and interests. Of these the two most noticeable are the tendency to play and the tendency to construct. Even if a mother had no higher motive than to keep her little child out of mischief she would welcome a treasury of devices that will always be at hand to answer the question, "Mother, what shall I do now?" But most mothers appreciate the value and importance of well directed play and work. In "Things to Make and Things to Do" are given the directions for elementary cooking, sewing, woodworking and other handicraft. Successful teachers who are close to young children, and who kept home conditions in mind in all their writing, prepared these sections. Educationally they are sound, but, better than that, they are simple and explicit, and within the reach of the resources of each home. Here, too, are the suggestions for the directed and undirected play of the wee tots. The material in this department, while complete in itself, will prepare the way for and supplement all teaching in schools of these important subjects. It is of the first importance that boys and girls recognize the true nature of work and play. This department will help them in the right direction.

As a child grows older he craves true stories. "Mother, did it really happen?" "Father, was that make-believe or real?" These questions are but the sign of mental and spiritual growing pains. If the child is wisely aided, that poise which is so envied by the self-conscious person will be his. The chief factor in poise is knowledge.

To be at home in many lands and times is the mark of a really educated man or woman. Not all of us can actually travel, not all of us can have the privilege of the acquaintance of the world's great men and women, but it is within the reach of every one to-day to discover, through picture and description, the world's most far-away lands, and in the pages of books to have an intimate and inspiring acquaintance with the heroes of the nations. If we wish our children to be fine types of men and women, we must form their tastes in these large directions before they are overwhelmed by what is so ephemeral and worthless in literature and drama of the day.

"True Stories from Every Land" is prepared to catch the attention and to hold the interest of young children. Foreign lands are studied not by their boundaries and political affairs, but through the home life, the customs, the sports, and the work of their children, their men, and their women. The approach to history is made by biographies of some of the most interesting heroes, and especially by accounts of the adventurous pioneer days of America. The illustrations in this department are multitudinous, graphic, up-to-date, and many of them unusual. These stories will assist in home and school studies, because they illustrate the history, customs, manners, and peoples of different countries. They will help little children to learn how to read, and incidentally teach them much that will help them to appreciate the privilege and responsibility of being good Americans.

A good book of songs, familiar, tuneful, suitable to all occasions, and graded to suit the differing tastes of separate members of the family, is always welcome. The collection of "Famous Songs," edited by Winton James Baltzell, is skillfully assembled from the best song-books available, and it also contains many pieces of unusual charm not so generally known. The songs for little children, for instance, are based upon a list approved by our leading kindergartners. A novel feature is that not only are the songs within range of children's voices, but many of them have been arranged for instrumental use, and some for folk-dancing.

In "Picture Stories" we have a delightful series of reproductions of masterpieces of painting and sculpture of the world's great art eras. Old masters and modern are well represented. The descriptions were written for children, remembering their interest in the story-element in pictures, and including inspiring details of the artists' lives. In the other volumes are many more reproductions of masterpieces.

There are two volumes entitled "Nature and Outdoor Life"; the first one, "Trees, Flowers, Amphibians, and Reptiles," begins with talks about earth, air, and sky, the clouds and weather, the seasons, the ways of bees and bugs and birds, illustrated with portraits of real children busy in observing the things of nature. Then follow sections on Familiar Flowers, Plant Life, Common Trees, and Reptiles and Amphibians, each written by an expert on the subject, and all profusely illustrated with photographs and drawings, many of the illustrations being in color. All this material is written in an easy and familiar style and in a manner to stimulate the right kind of curiosity. Children are encouraged to ask questions, and are unconsciously led to observe and read for themselves. Both this volume and its companion, "Birds, Animals, and Insects," help boys and girls to find out many secrets of nature. In the second nature series we begin with pets and domestic animals, and then study the wild animals and birds of America. Next we learn of the ways of the birds and animals in other lands, which we meet in the zoological gardens of our own country. The volume closes with descriptions of the invertebrates.

The natural sciences are cared for in "Earth, Sea, and Sky." Each division is more fascinating than the last, as it unfolds the world to us. We all want to know, and ought to know, more about the sphere upon which we live, its place in the universe, how it came to be peopled, and what are some of the laws that govern its magnificent forces and changes. This department is as interesting to old as to young, though it will find a warm place in the hearts of the youths who are just getting interested in physics, physiography, chemistry, and electricity.

An earlier volume covered the play and hand-work of little children. Our young people are now ready for games more skillful and cooperative, and handicraft more elaborate and involving a finer finish. "Games and Handicraft" supplies this need. If we are going to have a more interesting home life, if we are going to keep our boys and girls off the streets and away (sometimes) from the movies, if we are going to supplement the textbook work of the schools by the education of the hands, we need adequate handbooks to guide us. Sometimes such books are too vague to be practical. Here are working-drawings that are detailed and exact. That these projects can be executed is evidenced by the photographs of the finished work.

"Where can I get up-to-date, interesting and trustworthy descriptions of modern inventions for my young folks?" How many times this question is asked of book-store clerks by fathers! How often is a satisfactory answer given? Often such books are not up to date; usually they are too technical to be interesting; if they are interesting they are often untrustworthy; and none of them covers more than a portion of the ground. "Wonders of Invention" represents an earnest endeavor to meet this wide need within the covers of a single volume. The Editors were fortunate in obtaining for this department the cooperation of steamship companies, great electrical concerns, concrete firms, inventors and others "who know." The illustrations were selected individually, and add to the value and interest of the text.

VOCATIONAL GUIDANCE

As a child develops toward maturity his talents begin to focus and his interests to direct themselves toward some special life occupation. The matter of Vocational Guidance is the most vital thing in education to-day, but wisdom in this field is far to seek. Changes in the industrial world are so rapid that books giving mere statistics of salaries and requirements are soon out of date, and they have no appeal to the young. Motive, rather than immediate gain, is what affects young people; and the Editors of The BOOKSHELF have felt that the one wise way to approach this great question is to describe the important activities of the world and some of the men who have been occupied in them, that young readers may be able to make an intelligent choice, and at the same time discover their own special talents. This section of The BOOKSHELF is known as "Marvels of Industry." Aside from its value as a vocational guide, this volume will add much to the enjoyment of the family circle because of the facts that are gleaned from a perusal of its pages.

In "True Stories from Every Land" the little folks made the acquaintance of the world's children. It is now time for the older young folk to travel. In "Every Land and Its Story" we take a journey around the world, beginning in North America, covering the rest of the New World, and then going to Europe, Asia, Africa, Australia, and the islands of the sea. The greatest emphasis is laid upon the lands that we love the most. In the United States the eight great natural divisions are described, then the Indians, the National Parks, Alaska, and Porto Rico. The greatest cities are visited in turn, the characteristics of each being picturesquely described. Canada is visited in the same way. In each case the country is described by a competent, interesting traveler, in many instances by one who has lived there a long time, and in some cases by a famous writer. Carefully chosen photographs illustrate this department.

Carlyle was right, at least as far as young people are concerned, when he insisted that history is only biography. The character-making influence of great lives has never been denied, and ought never to be neglected. "Famous Men and Women" begins with the men who made the United States and Canada. It tells about some of the living Men Who Count to-day. A simple graphic history of the greatest event in history, the World War of 1914-1918, is given. Then comes a glorious pageant of Scientists and Inventors, Writers and Rulers, National Heroes, and Servants of the Common Good. This material will not only form an excellent supplemental reading book, but a valued treasury for everyday inspiration.

Crowning the collection, and of surpassing importance, is "Bookland—Story and Verse." This is an introduction to the best literature in poetry and prose for young people from twelve to twenty; in fact, for young people from twelve to eighty. The prose stories are presented in the language of the masters themselves. There is no diluting of their fine literary style. Careful abridgments have been made by well-known literary critics, but the essence of these masterpieces has been retained. This is important: our young people should know the great, not only about them. The poems are usually given entire.

In making the General Index and the Graded Index the Editors have remembered that these are for use, not to fill space. The General Index is practical and will help the user to find just what he is looking for, and to find it quickly. The Graded Index is intended primarily for the use of the parent. It sorts out and selects the best material for each age. First is given a brief, clear account of the tastes and needs of Infancy, Early Childhood, Middle Childhood, Late Childhood, and Adolescence. Then all the material in The BOOKSHELF is assorted under its score of important subjects, and put in the grade where it belongs. By this plan the child may be directed to what he wants and needs now, and each year he will grow more and more into the riches of his BOOKSHELF.

QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS

Many questions are listed in the Indexes. This is a very instructive feature, for it often sets the mind alert in some new direction and starts fresh lines of interest and research. These questions may be made the means of making many a family evening one of pleasure and profit, as one member asks the questions and the others take turns in answering them.

AMERICAN

The BOOKSHELF is American in viewpoint, but worldwide in outlook. While it has been produced within the United States, it is larger than the United States or even than North America. Unusual space is given to Canadian affairs and interests, and the rest of the world has not been neglected. Throughout the entire set, and in the CHILD WELFARE MANUAL, available to parents in connection with The BOOKSHELF, there is an emphasis on character, uprightness, honor, service, which is distinctly aimed to build up that type of manhood and womanhood for which the good American is famed at home and abroad.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

The Publishers and the Editors wish to thank each and every one of the individuals who have cooperated with them to make The BOOKSHELF what it is. The courtesy, the heartiness with which assistance has been given, the belief of these friends in the success of the ideals of The BOOKSHELF, have made the task of compiling, editing, and manufacturing a pleasure.

Special acknowledgment must be given at this time to the photographers, Brown Brothers, Underwood & Underwood, and the Publishers Photo Service, for the use of many copyrighted pictures from their files. In a number of instances, when they did not have a particular picture desired, it was made by one of them specially for The BOOKSHELF.

The Editors, in preparing the manuscript for these volumes, have endeavored in all cases where material has been used which has previously appeared in print to give credit to author, publisher, and book, and to any other to whom such acknowledgment was due. If they have failed to do so in any particular case, it has been an oversight, for which the Publishers are not responsible, as their instructions on this point were definite, and for which the Editors express their regrets. Future editions will offer an opportunity for the correction, which will be gladly made.



INTRODUCTION TO VOLUME I

Most mothers and fathers realize that long before children are old enough to read there is a rich treasury of rhythm and song and story that may be given them. To make this treasury available is the purpose of this volume.

Finger-plays and action-plays, in which Froebel found so rich a meaning, do much to help the baby to know and control his fingers and hands, to enable him to discover the other parts of his body, to awaken his intelligence and to bring him into affectionate companionship with his father and mother. Here we have gathered not only the traditional ones, which the mother and father may remember from their own early childhood; but also many that will be fresh and new.

Mother Goose long ago established her throne as Queen of the Nursery. There is something about her short ditties, always full of rhythm, sometimes of sense, and frequently of the most elemental humor, that appeals to the baby mind as nothing else does. A proof of the worth of her songs and stories would be found if any of us should try to write better. We have brought together many familiar ones and some unfamiliar (for Mother Goose lived in many times and many lands), and have illustrated them with some new and charming drawings and color-plates.

Children as young as three are ready for the simplest sort of stories, but it is so hard for us grown-ups to become children again that many of us have found difficulty in suiting our language and thought to their eager but unfurnished minds. These bedtime stories and little tales of babies and animals and girls and boys are therefore a real godsend.

Soon comes the time when the little folk are ready to learn about the letters and the numbers and the days of the week. Rhymes to help this first memorizing will be welcome.

Most of the stories in this book are illustrated by pictures, some are told entirely by them. The choice of these illustrations was made from our best modern knowledge about little children. It is now recognized that they like simple incidents, about themselves or the familiar things around them, drawn in clear outline or with strong color. There are certain artists, too, who seem to have retained their own childlikeness better than others, and such were called upon to illustrate this volume.

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CONTENTS PAGE

GENERAL INTRODUCTION vii INTRODUCTION TO VOLUME ONE xv

FATHER AND MOTHER PLAYS

BABY'S TEN LITTLE LIVE PLAYTHINGS 2 By J. K. Barry MONDAY 4 By Edith Goodyear FINGER PLAY 5 By Edith Goodyear COUNTING THE FINGERS 6 AN OLD NORSE FINGER PLAY 6 BABY'S TOES 6 BABY'S TOES 7 By Edith A. Bentley THIS IS THE WAY MY FINGERS STAND 8 THUMBKIN, POINTER 8 NAMING THE FINGERS 8 By Laura E. Richards ROBERT BARNS 8 "SHALL I, OH! SHALL I?" 8 JACK, BE NIMBLE 9 TWO LITTLE HANDS 9 PAT A CAKE 9 CLAP YOUR HANDS 9 THE BIRD'S NEST 10 A Froebel Finger Play TWO LITTLE BLACKBIRDS 10 MASTER SMITH 10 LITTLE ROBIN REDBREAST 10 GREETING 10 A PLAY FOR THE ARMS 10 THE LITTLE WINDOW 10 A Froebel Finger Play SING A SONG OF SIXPENCE 11 THE PIGEON HOUSE 11 A Froebel Finger Play SAID THIS LITTLE FAIRY 12 A BURROWING GAME 12 PAT A CAKE 12 A Froebel Finger Play A KNEE GAME 12 A FOOT PLAY 12 PUTTING THE FINGERS TO SLEEP 13 TEN LITTLE SQUIRRELS 14 MY LITTLE GARDEN 15 THE FAMILY 16 By Emilie Poulsson JOHNNY SHALL HAVE A NEW BONNET 18

RIDING SONGS FOR FATHER'S KNEE

TO MARKET RIDE THE GENTLEMEN 19 HERE GOES MY LORD 19 A FARMER WENT TROTTING 20 UP TO THE CEILING 20 THE MESSENGER 20 CATCH HIM, CROW 20 RIDE A COCK-HORSE 21 THIS IS THE WAY 21 RIDE AWAY, RIDE AWAY 21 TO MARKET, TO MARKET 21 TROT, TROT, THE BABY GOES 21 By Mary F. Butts RIDE A COCK-HORSE 22 HERE WE GO 22

MOTHER GOOSE SONGS AND STORIES

WHO ARE THESE? 24 I SAW A SHIP A-SAILING 25 GOOSEY, GOOSEY, GANDER 25 THE WIND 25 ONCE I SAW A LITTLE BIRD 25 RING-A-RING-A-ROSES 25 CROSS PATCH 26 HAPPY LET US BE 26 THE OLD WOMAN IN THE BASKET 26 THE FOX AND THE OLD GRAY GOOSE 28 JACK AND JILL 29 WILLY BOY 29 BONNY LASS 29 OH, WHERE ARE YOU GOING? 30 BOBBY SHAFTOE 30 DING-DONG-BELL 30 LONDON BRIDGE 31 GREEN GRAVEL 32 OLD MOTHER HUBBARD 32 LITTLE BO-PEEP 34 COME OUT TO PLAY 35 LITTLE ROBIN REDBREAST 35 LITTLE BOY BLUE 36 MY MAID MARY 36 HARK! HARK! 37 BOW-WOW-WOW 37 BLOW, WIND, BLOW 37 BYE, BABY BUNTING 37 THREE LITTLE KITTENS 38 TOM WAS A PIPER'S SON 39 DAFFY-DOWN-DILLY 40 BILLY BOY 40 THREE WISE MEN OF GOTHAM 41 LITTLE TOMMY TUCKER 41 PUSSY AND THE MICE 41 WHEN I WAS A LITTLE BOY 41 CHINESE MOTHER-GOOSE RHYMES 42 By Prof. Isaac Taylor Headland

MOTHER GOOSE CONTINUED By Anna Marion Smith

PUSSY CAT, PUSSY CAT 45 LITTLE BOY BLUE 45 PAT-A-CAKE 46 DICKORY DOCK 46 HOW MANY MILES TO BABYLON? 47 HARK! HARK! 47 THERE WAS AN OLD WOMAN 48 HUMPTY DUMPTY 51 THE QUEEN OF HEARTS 54 ONE MISTY, MOISTY MORNING 54 OLD KING COLE 55 PUSSY SITS BESIDE THE FIRE 56 THE NORTH WIND DOTH BLOW 56 I HAD A LITTLE HUSBAND 57 THERE WAS A MAN IN OUR TOWN 57 SEE SAW, SACARADOWN 57 SING A SONG O' SIXPENCE 58 I LOVE LITTLE PUSSY 58 THE HORNER BROTHERS 59 By Elizabeth Raymond Woodward A LITTLE OLD MAN 60 JINGLES 60 SAILING 61 By Lucy Fitch Perkins AN UP-TO-DATE PUSSY-CAT 62 By Adeline Knapp MISERY IN COMPANY 63 By Lucy Fitch Perkins COURT NEWS 64 By Lucy Fitch Perkins A MESSAGE TO MOTHER GOOSE 65 By Ellen Manly

SLEEPY-TIME SONGS AND STORIES

SWEET AND LOW 72 By Alfred, Lord Tennyson THE SLEEPY-TIME STORY 73 By Gertrude Smith THE GO SLEEP STORY 75 By Eudora S. Bumstead THE GENTLE DARK 78 By W. Grahame Robertson THE FERRY FOR SHADOWTOWN 78 HUSH-A-BYE, BABY 78 THE KITTEN AND THE FALLING LEAVES 78 By William Wordsworth LATE 79 By Josephine Preston Peabody A BLESSING FOR THE BLESSED 80 By Laurence Alma-Tadema MY DOLLY 80 THE CHILD AND THE WORLD 80 EVENING SONG 80 By C. Frances Alexander ROCK-A-BYE, BABY 80 THE SANDMAN 81 By Margaret Vandergrift THE FAIRY FOLK 81 By Robert Bird QUEEN MAB 82 By Thomas Hood LULLABY 82 By Gertrude Thompson Miller KENTUCKY BABE 82 MY POSSESSIONS 83 THE WAKE-UP STORY 83 By Eudora S. Bumstead

FIRST STORIES FOR VERY LITTLE FOLK

ABOUT SIX LITTLE CHICKENS 86 By S. L. Elliott "TRADE-LAST" 88 By Lucy Fitch Perkins PHILIP'S HORSE 89 THE KITTEN THAT FORGOT HOW TO MEW 90 By Stella George Stern WHAT COULD THE FARMER DO? 93 By George William Ogden FLEDGLINGS 97 By Lucy Fitch Perkins "TIME TO GET UP!" 98 By Ellen Foster MAGGIE'S VERY OWN SECRET 100 By Sara Josephine Albright THE GOOD LITTLE PIGGIE AND HIS FRIENDS 102 By L. Waldo Lockling BABY'S PARADISE 105 By Lucy Fitch Perkins DISOBEDIENCE 106 FOR A LITTLE GIRL OF THREE 108 By Uncle Ned A FUNNY FAMILY 109 LITTLE BY LITTLE 110

LITTLE STORIES THAT GROW BIG

THE HOUSE THAT JACK BUILT 111 GIANT THUNDER BONES 112 By Stella Doughty THE HOUSE THAT JILL BUILT 116 By Carolyn Wells THE OLD WOMAN AND HER PIG 119 THE LAMBIKIN 121 THE CAT AND THE MOUSE 123 HENNY-PENNY 124 THREE GOATS IN THE RYEFIELD 127 Adapted by Cecilia Farwell TEENY TINY 129 SONG OF THE PEAR TREE 130 COCK-ALU AND HEN-ALIE 131 By Mary Howitt THERE IS THE KEY OF THE KINGDOM 136

FUN FOR VERY LITTLE FOLK

NO DOGS ALLOWED AT LARGE 137 By Culmer Barnes TOMMY AND HIS SISTER AND THEIR NEW PONY-CART 138 By Dewitt Clinton Falls THE ADVENTURES OF THREE LITTLE KITTENS 139 By Culmer Barnes THE LITTLE KITTENS' SURPRISE 140 By Culmer Barnes TED'S FOOLISH WISH 141 By Charles Fitch Lester NONSENSE RHYME 142 TIMOTHY TRUNDLE 143 By Frederick Moxon A DREAM OF GLORY 148 By Charles Fitch Lester PICTURES 149 By Culmer Barnes THE REUNION OF THE BRUIN FAMILY AT THE SEA SHORE 150 By Culmer Barnes THE BABY MICE ARE INSTRUCTED BY THEIR FOND PAPA 151 By Culmer Barnes ROLY POLY ON VACATION 152 By Culmer Barnes MOTHER GOOSE'S LAST TROLLEY RIDE 153 By Culmer Barnes IVAN AND THE WOLF 154 By Culmer Barnes HOMEWARD BOUND 154 By Culmer Barnes THEIR LITTLE JAR 156 By Bell LITTLE ESKI AND THE POLAR BEAR 158 By Culmer Barnes

FUNNY VERSES AND PICTURES

THE FROG'S FIASCO 160 By D. K. Stevens THE MUSICAL TRUST 164 By D. K. Stevens THE CAUTIOUS CAT 168 By D. K. Stevens THREE LITTLE BEARS 171 By M. C. McNeill THE SNOWMAN 172 By W. W. Ellsworth

ANIMAL STORIES

TINY HARE AND THE WIND BALL 173 By A. L. Sykes HOW TINY HARE MET CAT 176 By A. L. Sykes THE WEE HARE AND THE RED FIRE 179 By A. L. Sykes THE GOOD KING 182 By Margaret and Clarence Weed EARLY AND LATE 184 By W. S. Reed THE LITTLE PINK PIG AND THE BIG ROAD 185 By Jasmine Stone Van Dresser JUGGERJOOK 188 By L. Frank Baum WHAT YOU BURYING, A BONE 194 THE LITTLE GRAY KITTEN 194 By Mary Lawrence Turnbull PUSSY'S WHEELS 197 By Annie W. McCullough THE SMALL GRAY MOUSE 198 By Nathan Haskell Dole THE RABBIT, THE TURTLE, AND THE OWL 200 HOMES 201 By Annie W. McCullough MEAL-TIME IN THE BEAR-PITS AT THE ZOO 202 By I. W. Taben THE FINE GOOD SHOW 204 By Jessie Wright Whitcomb GAY AND SPY 208 THE BALLAD OF A RUNAWAY DONKEY 212 By Emilie Poulsson THE THREE BEARS 220 THE LITTLE BEAR'S STORY 221 By C. F. Holder THE HARE AND THE HEDGEHOG 224 By The Brothers Grimm THE WEE ROBIN'S CHRISTMAS SONG 226 A Scotch Story, attributed to Robert Burns Adapted by Jennie Ellis Burdick THE FOX 228 THREE COMPANIONS 229 By Dinah Maria Mulock-Craik "'FRAID CAT!" 230 By Frank Munro THE SPIDER AND THE FLY 231 By Mary Howitt

EVERY-DAY VERSES

A LITTLE GENTLEMAN 233 By Alden Arthur Knipe TIME FOR EVERYTHING 233 By Alden Arthur Knipe UMBRELLAS AND RUBBERS 234 By Alden Arthur Knipe WHISPERING IN SCHOOL 234 By Alden Arthur Knipe RECESS 235 By Alden Arthur Knipe AFTER SCHOOL 235 By Alden Arthur Knipe MONDAY'S LESSONS 235 By Alden Arthur Knipe AT DINNER 236 By Alden Arthur Knipe VALOR 237 By Lucy Fitch Perkins A DOMESTIC TRAGEDY 238 By Lucy Fitch Perkins THE CAPITALIST 239 By Lucy Fitch Perkins IN MERRY ENGLAND 240 By Lucy Fitch Perkins THE GOOSE GIRL 241 By Lucy Fitch Perkins THE PHILOSOPHER 242 By Lucy Fitch Perkins THIRSTY FLOWERS 243 By Alden Arthur Knipe SHARING WITH OTHERS 243 By Alden Arthur Knipe POCKETS 244 By Alden Arthur Knipe WAITING FOR DINNER 244 By Alden Arthur Knipe THE CRITIC 245 By Lucy Fitch Perkins DIPLOMACY 246 By Lucy Fitch Perkins IF I WERE QUEEN 247 By Lucy Fitch Perkins THOUGHTS IN CHURCH 248 By Lucy Fitch Perkins

THE DAYS OF THE WEEK

THIS IS THE WAY 249 DAYS OF BIRTH 250 THE WASHING 250 SOLOMON GRUNDY 250 BABY'S PLAY DAYS 250 WHICH DO YOU CHOOSE? 251 SEVEN LITTLE MICE 251 By Stella George Stern VISITING 252 LITTLE TOMMY'S MONDAY MORNING 252 By Tudor Jenks ST. SATURDAY 254 By Henry Johnstone

NUMBER RHYMES

1, 2, 3, 4, 5 255 OVER IN THE MEADOW 255 By Olive A. Wadsworth COUNTING APPLE-SEEDS 256 TWINS 257 By Lucy Fitch Perkins THE RHYME OF TEN LITTLE RABBITS 258 By Kate N. Mytinger IN JULY 260 By A. S. Webber THE WISH OF PRISCILLA PENELOPE POWERS 262 By Mrs. John T. Van Sant WINKELMAN VON WINKEL 262 By Clara Odell Lyon TEN LITTLE COOKIES 263 OUR BABY 263 LONG TIME AGO 264 By Elizabeth Prentiss BUCKLE MY SHOE 264

STORIES FOR LITTLE GIRLS

A PAIR OF GLOVES 265 By H. G. Duryee A VERY LITTLE STORY OF A VERY LITTLE GIRL 268 By Alice E. Allen EDITH'S TEA PARTY 269 By Lois Walters REBECCA 271 By Eleanor Piatt DOROTHEA'S SCHOOL GIFTS 272 By Eunice Ward THE LOST MONEY 276 By Bolton Hall A DUTCH TREAT 277 By Amy B. Johnson THE JINGLE OF THE LITTLE JAP 283 By Isabel Eccleston Mackay THE SEVENTH BIRTHDAY OF THE LITTLE COUSIN FROM CONSTANTINOPLE 284 By Emma C. Dowd LITTLE RED RIDING-HOOD 286 Retold from Grimm DOLLY'S DOCTOR 288 THUMBELINA 288 By Hans Christian Andersen THE FOX AND THE LITTLE RED HEN 294 THE SHOEMAKER AND THE LITTLE ELVES 294 By The Brothers Grimm THE GINGERBREAD BOY 296

STORIES FOR LITTLE BOYS

MISCHIEF 297 By Rosamond Upham WILLIE AND HIS DOG DIVER 299 By H. N. Powers GORDON'S TOY CASTLE ON THE HILL 300 By Everett Wilson HANS THE INNOCENT 302 Written and Illustrated by M. I. Wood A REAL LITTLE BOY BLUE 304 By Caroline S. Allen TRAVELS OF A FOX 306 Adapted by Cecilia Farwell OEYVIND AND MARIT 308

HAPPY DAYS

WHAT THE CAT AND HEN DID 313 By Alice Ralston DOT'S BIRTHDAY CAKE 316 NED AND ROVER AND JACK 317 I HAD A LITTLE KITTEN 318 HOW POLLY HAD HER PICTURE TAKEN 319 By Everett Wilson IDLE BEN 321 THE HOLE IN THE CANNA-BED 321 By Isabel Gordon Curtis THE CONCEITED MOUSE 323 By Ella Foster Case

RHYMES CONCERNING MOTHER

A BOY'S MOTHER 325 By James Whitcomb Riley MOTHER 325 By Rose Fyleman THE GOODEST MOTHER 325 MOTHER'S WAY 326 By Carrie Williams WHO IS IT? 326 By Ethel M. Kelley MY DEAREST IS A LADY 327 By Miriam S. Clark HOW MANY LUMPS? 327 WHEN MOTHER GOES AWAY 328 By Clara Odell Lyon AN OLD SONG—"THERE'S NO PLACE LIKE HOME!" 328 By Blanche Elizabeth Wade

UNCLES AND AUNTS AND OTHER RELATIVES

GRANDMOTHER'S MEMORIES 329 By Helen A. Byrom GREAT-AUNT LUCY LEE 330 By Cora Walker Hayes OUR VISITORS 334 By Isabel Lyndall BEAUTIFUL GRANDMAMMA 338 THANKSGIVING DAY 340 By Lydia Maria Child GRANDMA'S MINUET 340 AUNT JAN 341 By Norman Gale AFTER TEA 342

AMUSING ALPHABETS

TINGLE, TANGLE TITMOUSE 343 AN ENGLISH ALPHABET 344 NONSENSE ALPHABET 346 PAST HISTORY 348 By Edward Lear THE APPLE PIE 351 WHO'S WHO IN THE ZOO 352 By Carolyn Wells A WAS AN ARCHER 357 A LITTLE FOLKS' ALPHABET 358 By Carolyn Wells CHILD HEALTH ALPHABET 360 By Mrs. Frederick Peterson HERE'S A, B, C, D 363 OUR STORIES 364

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FATHER PLAYS AND MOTHER PLAYS





BABY'S TEN LITTLE LIVE PLAYTHINGS BY J. K. BARRY

These ten little live playthings can be held in every baby's hand, five in one and five in the other and be the baby ever so poor yet he always has these ten playthings because, you know, he brings them with him.

But all babies do not know how to play with them. They find out for themselves a good many ways of playing with them but here are some of the ways that a baby I used to know got amusement out of his.

The very first was the play called "Ta-ra-chese" (Ta-rar-cheese). It is a Dutch word and there was a little song about it all in Dutch. This is the way the baby I knew would play it when he was a tiny little fellow.

His Mamma would hold her hand up and move it gently around this way (Fig. 1) singing "Ta-ra-chese, ta-ra-chese!" Baby would look and watch awhile, and presently his little hand would begin to move and five little playthings would begin the play—dear, sweet little chubby pink fingers—for I think you have guessed these are every baby's playthings.

How glad Mamma is to find that her baby has learned his first lesson!

Then he must learn, "Pat-a-cake, pat-a-cake Baker's man," (Fig. 2) and "How big is baby?" "So Big!"

And here are some other ways by which a little sister's fingers may amuse the baby.

"This the church and this is the steeple, Open the gates—there are all the good people." (Fig. 3)

"Chimney sweep—Oho! oho! Chimney sweep!" (Fig. 4)

"Put your finger in the bird's nest. The bird isn't home." (Fig. 5)

And then when the little finger is poked in, a sly pinch is given by a hidden thumb and baby is told, "The birdie has just come home!" But you mustn't pinch hard, of course, just enough to make baby laugh at being caught.



And then there is the play of "Two men sawing wood—one little boy picking up chips." (Fig. 6) The two finger men are moved up and down and the little boy finger works busily.

Everybody knows the rhyming finger-play:

"Here's my Father's knives and forks, (Fig. 7) "Here's my Mother's table, (Fig. 8) "Here's my Sister's looking-glass, (Fig. 9) "And here's the baby's cradle." (Fig. 10)

Another play is a little act in which three persons are supposed to take part, and it has come down from the old times of long ago.

The middle finger is the Friar. Those on each side of him touch each other and make the door, the little finger is the Lady and the thumb is the Page. (Fig. 11)

The Friar knocks at the door.

Friar. "Knock, Knock, Knock!"

Page. "Somebody knocks at the door! Somebody knocks at the door!"

Lady. "Who is it? Who is it?"

Page. (Going to door) "Who is it? Who is it?"

Friar. "A Friar, a Friar."

Page. "A Friar, Ma'am, a Friar, Ma'am."

Lady. "What does he want? What does he want?"

Page. "What do you want, Sir? What do you want, Sir?"

Friar. "I want to come in. I want to come in."

Page. "He wants to come in, Ma'am. He wants to come in."

Lady. "Let him walk in. Let him walk in."

Page. "Will you walk in, Sir? Will you walk in?"

So in he pops and takes a seat.

When each player is supposed to speak he or she must move gently, bending forward and back and when the Friar is invited to enter, the door must open only just far enough to let him "pop in."

These are only some of the plays with which the baby I knew used to be amused; but they will suggest others to parents and older brothers and sisters. The baby cannot make all of these things himself but he will be quite as much interested when they are made by older hands.

MONDAY

Here's a little wash bench, Here's a little tub. Here's a little scrubbing-board, And here's the way to rub. Here's a little cake of soap, Here's a dipper new. Here's a basket wide & deep, And here are clothes-pins two. Here's the line away up high, Here's the clothes all flying. Here's the sun so warm & bright, And now the washing's drying. Edith Goodyear.

Finger Play.

By Edith Goodyear.

The little space 'twixt fingers & thumbs Is round as a circle you see! While in there, a tiny square Shows corners four to me.

Circles are like daisies while, Like pennies, candies and plates, Like Grandma's cookies and pumpkin pies; And best of all, the pretty blue In Baby's laughing eyes.

The square makes me think of the rug where he sits On the nursery floor at play; Of the lawn where he rolls in the sunshine bright, And the dainty spread that covers his bed When he's fast asleep at night.

COUNTING THE FINGERS

This is the thumb, you see; This finger shakes the tree; And then this finger comes up; And this one eats the plums up; This little one, says he, "I'll tell of you, you'll see!"

That one is the thumb; And this one wants a plum; This one says, "Where do they grow?" This one says, "Come with me—I know." But this little one, he says, "I will not go near the place! I don't like such naughty ways."

Now, I think that through and through Little Finger's right—don't you?

This one fell in the water, And this one helped him ashore, And this one put him into bed, And this one covered him o'er; And then, in walks this noisy little chap, And wakes him up once more.

This one walked out into the wood, And caught a little hare; And this one took and carried it home, For he thought it dainty fare; And this one came and cooked it up With sauces rich and rare; And this one laid the table out, And did the plates prepare; And this little fellow the keeper told What the others were doing there.

AN OLD NORSE FINGER PLAY

Thicken man, build the barn, Thinner man, spool the yarn, Longen man, stir the brew, Gowden man, make a shoe, Littlen man, all for you!

BABY'S TOES

Dear little bare feet, Dimpled and white, In your long nightgown Wrapped for the night.

Come, let me count all Your queer little toes, Pink as the heart Of a shell or a rose.

One is a lady That sits in the sun; Two is a baby, And three is a nun.

Four is a lily With innocent breast; And five is a birdie Asleep on her nest.

"BABY'S TOES"

BY EDITH A. BENTLEY

Five little piggie wiggies Standing in a row, We always have to toddle Where the baby wants to go; Up-stairs and down-stairs, Indoors and out, We're always close together And we never fall out.

Chorus: Father-Pig and Mother-Pig, And Big-Brother Pig, And Sister-Pig, and darling little Baby Piggie-Wig!

Oh, sometimes we are all tied up In a bag so tight. This is when the baby goes "To sleepy-bye" at night. Then there's nothing else to do But cuddle down and rest— Just as little birdies cuddle In their little nest.

Chorus: Father-Pig and Mother-Pig And Big-Brother Pig, And Sister-Pig, and darling little Baby Piggie-Wig!

THIS IS THE WAY MY FINGERS STAND

To the tune of "Here We Go Round the Mulberry Bush."

This is the way my fingers stand, Fingers stand, fingers stand, This is the way my fingers stand, So early in the morning.

This is the way I fold my hand, Fold my hand, fold my hand, This is the way I fold my hand, So early in the morning.

This is the way they dance about, Dance about, dance about, This is the way they dance about, So early in the morning.

This is the way they go to rest, Go to rest, go to rest, This is the way they go to rest, So early in the morning.

THUMBKIN, POINTER

Thumbkin, Pointer, Middleman big, Sillyman, Weeman, rig-a-jig-jig.

NAMING THE FINGERS[A]

BY LAURA E. RICHARDS

This is little Tommy Thumb, Round and smooth as any plum. This is busy Peter Pointer: Surely he's a double-jointer. This is mighty Toby Tall, He's the biggest one of all. This is dainty Reuben Ring: He's too fine for anything. And this little wee one, maybe, Is the pretty Finger-baby.

All the five we've counted now, Busy fingers in a row. Every finger knows the way How to work and how to play; Yet together work they best, Each one helping all the rest.

[A] From "Songs and Music of Froebel's Mother Play"; used by permission of the publishers, D. Appleton & Company.

ROBERT BARNS

Robert Barns, fellow fine, Can you shoe this horse of mine, So that I may cut a shine? Yes, good sir, and that I can, As well as any other man; There a nail, and here a prod, And now, good sir, your horse is shod.

"SHALL I, OH! SHALL I?"

A little boy and a little girl Lived in an alley; Said the little boy to the little girl, "Shall I, oh! shall I?"

Said the little girl to the little boy, "What will you do?" Said the little boy to the little girl, "I will kiss you."

(As the last words are sung, the mother kisses the little one in the folds of the neck.)



JACK, BE NIMBLE

Jack, be nimble, Jack, be quick; (Jack is one hand walking along on its fore- and middle-fingers.)

Jack, jump over The candlestick. (Fist closed; uplifted thumb for candle. Jack jumps over it.)

TWO LITTLE HANDS

Two little hands so soft and white, This is the left—this is the right. Five little fingers stand on each, So I can hold a plum or a peach. But if I should grow as old as you Lots of little things these hands can do.

PAT A CAKE

Pat a cake, pat a cake, baker's man. So I do, master, as fast as I can. Pat it, and prick it, and mark it with T, And then it will serve for Tommy and me.

CLAP YOUR HANDS

Baby, Baby, clap your hands! Where London's built, there London stands. And there's a bed in London Town, On which my Baby shall lie down.

THE BIRD'S NEST

A Froebel Finger Play

Here upon the leaves at rest A little bird has built her nest. Two tiny eggs within she's laid, And many days beside them stayed. Now she's happy; listen well! Two baby birds break through the shell. Don't you hear them? "Peep! peep! peep! We love you, mother. Cheep! cheep! cheep!"

TWO LITTLE BLACKBIRDS

There were two blackbirds sitting on a hill, (Little pieces of paper perched on forefingers.) One named Jack, the other named Jill. Fly away, Jack; fly away, Jill. (Fingers soar gently in the air.) Come again, Jack; come again, Jill. (Fingers fly back.)

MASTER SMITH

Is Master Smith within? Yes, that he is. Can he set a shoe? Ay, marry, two. Here a nail, and there a nail, Tick—tack—too.

LITTLE ROBIN REDBREAST

Little Robin Redbreast Sat upon a rail, (Right hand extended in shape of a bird is poised on extended forefinger of left hand.) Niddle noddle went his head, And waggle went his tail. (Little finger of right hand waggles from side to side.)

GREETING

Good little Mother, How do you do? Dear strong "Daddy," Glad to see you! Big tall Brother, Pleased you are here. Kind little Sister, You need not fear, Glad welcome we'll give you, And Babykins, too. Yes, Babykins, How do you do?

A PLAY FOR THE ARMS

Pump, pump, pump, Water, water, come; Here a rush, there a gush, Done, done, done.

THE LITTLE WINDOW

A Froebel Finger Play

Look, my dear, at this window clear. See how the light shines through in here. If you would always see the light, Keep your heart's window clean and bright.

SING A SONG OF SIXPENCE

Sing a song of sixpence, A pocket full of rye; Four-and-twenty blackbirds Baked in a pie; When the pie was opened The birds began to sing; Was not that a dainty dish To set before the King?

The King was in his counting-house, Counting out his money; The Queen was in the parlor, Eating bread and honey; The maid was in the garden Hanging out the clothes; When up came a blackbird And nipped off her nose. (At this line somebody's nose gets nipped.)

THE PIGEON HOUSE

A Froebel Finger Play

Now I'm going to open my pigeon-house door. The pigeons fly out to the light, Straight to the meadows so pleasant they soar, And flutter about with delight. But at evening they'll all come home at last, And the door of the house I'll then shut fast.

SAID THIS LITTLE FAIRY

Said this little fairy, "I'm as thirsty as can be." Said this little fairy, "I'm hungry, too, dear me!" Said this little fairy, "Who'll tell us where to go?" Said this little fairy, "I'm sure that I don't know." Said this little fairy, "Let's brew some dewdrop tea." So they sipped it and ate honey beneath the maple tree.

A BURROWING GAME

See the little mousie, creeping up the stair, Looking for a warm nest—there, oh, there! (Mother's fingers creep up the body, and finally fumble in baby's neck.)

PAT A CAKE

A Froebel Finger Play

Baby, would you like to make For yourself a little cake? Pat it gently, smooth it down. Baker says: "Now, in to brown; Bring it here, baby dear, While the oven fire burns clear." "Baker, see, here is my cake; Bake it well for baby's sake." "In the oven, right deep down, Here the cake will soon get brown."

A KNEE GAME

What do I see? Baby's knee. Tickily, tickily, tic, tac, tee. One for a penny, two for a pound; Tickily, tickily, round and round.

A FOOT PLAY

Up, down—up, down. One foot up and one foot down, All the way to London town. Tra la la la la la.

PUTTING THE FINGERS TO SLEEP

My fingers are so sleepy It's time they went to bed, So first, you Baby Finger Tuck in your Little Head.

Ringman, come now its your turn, And then come, Tallman Great; Now, Pointer Finger, hurry Because its getting late.

Let's see if all are snuggled. No, here's one more to come, So come, lie close, little brothers, Make room for Master Thumb.

TEN LITTLE SQUIRRELS

Ten little squirrels up in a tree— (Ten fingers outspread.)

The first two said: "What do I see?" (Thumbs only.)

The next two said: "A man with a gun." (Forefingers only.)

The next two said: "Let's run, let's run." (Middle fingers only.)

The next two said: "Let's hide in the shade." (Ring fingers only.)

The last two said: "We're not afraid." (Little fingers only.)

Bang! went a gun. (Clap hands.)

Away they all run. (All fingers scamper off.)

MY LITTLE GARDEN

See my little garden, How I rake it over, Then I sow the little brown seeds, And with soft earth cover. Now the raindrops patter On the earth so gayly; See the big round sun smile On my garden daily. The little plant is waking; Down the roots grow creeping; Up now come the leaflets Through the brown earth peeping. Soon the buds will laugh up Toward the springtime showers; Soon my buds will open Into happy flowers.

THE FAMILY[B]

BY EMILIE POULSSON

This is the mother, so busy at home, Who loves her dear children, whatever may come.

This is the father, so brave and so strong, Who works for his family all the day long.

This is the brother, who'll soon be a man, He helps his good mother as much as he can.

This is the sister, so gentle and mild, Who plays that the dolly is her little child.

This is the baby, all dimpled and sweet, How soft his wee hands and his chubby pink feet!

Father, and mother, and children so dear, Together you see them, one family here.

[B] From "Songs and Music of Froebel's Mother Play"; used by permission of the publishers, D. Appleton & Co.



JOHNNY SHALL HAVE A NEW BONNET

Johnny shall have a new bonnet, And Johnny shall go to the fair, And Johnny shall have a new ribbon To tie up his bonny brown hair.

And why may not I love Johnny? And why may not Johnny love me? And why may not I love Johnny? As well as another body?

And here's a leg for a stocking, And here is a foot for a shoe, And he has a kiss for his daddy, And two for his mammy, I trow.

And why may not I love Johnny? And why may not Johnny love me? And why may not I love Johnny As well as another body?



RIDING SONGS for FATHER'S KNEE



TO MARKET RIDE THE GENTLEMEN

To market ride the gentlemen, So do we, so do we; Then comes the country clown, Hobbledy gee, Hobbledy gee; First go the ladies, nim, nim, nim, Next come the gentlemen, trim, trim, trim; Then come the country clowns, gallop-a-trot.

HERE GOES MY LORD

Here goes my lord— A trot! a trot! a trot! a trot! Here goes my lady— A canter! a canter! a canter! a canter! Here goes my young master— Jockey-hitch! jockey-hitch! jockey-hitch! jockey-hitch! Here goes my young miss— An amble! an amble! an amble! an amble! The footman lags behind, And goes gallop, a gallop, a gallop, to make up his time.

A FARMER WENT TROTTING

A farmer went trotting upon his gray mare; Bumpety, bumpety, bump! With his daughter behind him, so rosy and fair; Lumpety, lumpety, lump!

A raven cried croak! and they all tumbled down; Bumpety, bumpety, bump! The mare broke her knees, and the farmer his crown; Lumpety, lumpety, lump!

The mischievous raven flew laughing away; Bumpety, bumpety, bump! And vowed he would serve them the same the next day; Lumpety, lumpety, lump!

UP TO THE CEILING

Up to the ceiling, down to the ground, Backward and forward, round and round; Dance, little baby, and mother will sing, With the merry chorus, ding, ding, ding!

THE MESSENGER

Here in the morning we're starting so soon, Give us a message, we'll ride to the moon, Straight through the meadows and hop o'er the stile, And we will but charge you a farthing a mile. A farthing a mile! a farthing a mile! We will but charge you a farthing a mile.

CATCH HIM, CROW

Catch him, crow! Carry him, kite! Take him away till the apples are ripe; When they are ripe and ready to fall, Home comes [Johnny], apples and all.

RIDE A COCK-HORSE

Ride a Cock-Horse to Charing Cross, To see a Young Lady jump on a White Horse, With Rings on her Fingers, and Bells on her Toes, She shall have Music wherever she goes.

THIS IS THE WAY

This is the way the ladies ride, Nin! Nin! Nin! This is the way the gentlemen ride, Trot! Trot! Trot! This is the way the farmers ride, Jogglety! Jogglety! Jogglety! Jog!

RIDE AWAY, RIDE AWAY

Ride away, ride away, Johnny shall ride, And he shall have pussy-cat Tied to one side; And he shall have little dog Tied to the other, And Johnny shall ride To see his grandmother.

TO MARKET, TO MARKET

To market, to market, To buy a plum bun; Home again, home again, My journey is done.

TROT, TROT, THE BABY GOES

BY MARY F. BUTTS

Every evening Baby goes Trot, trot, to town— Across the river, through the fields, Up hill and down.

Trot, trot, the Baby goes, Up hill and down, To buy a feather for her hat, To buy a woolen gown.

Trot, trot, the Baby goes; The birds fly down, alack! "You cannot have our feathers, dear," They say; "so please trot back."

Trot, trot, the Baby goes; The lambs come bleating near. "You cannot have our wool," they say; "But we are sorry, dear."

Trot, trot, the Baby goes, Trot, trot, to town. She buys a red rose for her hat, She buys a cotton gown.

RIDE A COCK-HORSE

Ride a cock-horse to Banbury-cross, To see what Tommy can buy; A penny white loaf, a penny white cake, And a two-penny apple pie.

* * *

Ride a cock-horse to Shrewsbury-cross, To buy little Johnny a galloping horse; It trots behind and it ambles before, And Johnny shall ride till he can ride no more.

Here we go UP, UP, UP! Here we DOWN, DOWN, DOWN! Here we go BACKWARDS and FORWARDS! And here we go AROUND AND AROUND!



MOTHER GOOSE SONGS AND STORIES



WHO ARE THESE?

HERE ARE ONE, TWO, THREE, FOUR, FIVE, SIX STORY-BOOK PICTURES. ALL LITTLE GIRLS AND BOYS KNOW THE SIX STORIES THAT THESE SIX PICTURES BELONG TO. TELL YOUR MAMA AND PAPA WHAT THE STORIES ARE.



I SAW A SHIP A-SAILING

I saw a ship a-sailing, A-sailing on the sea; And, oh! it was all laden With pretty things for thee!

There were candies in the cabin, And apples in the hold; The sails were made of silk, And the masts were made of gold.

The four-and-twenty sailors That stood between the decks, Were four-and-twenty white mice, With chains about their necks.

The captain was a duck, With a packet on his back; And when the ship began to move, The captain cried, "Quack, quack!"

GOOSEY, GOOSEY, GANDER

Goosey, goosey, gander, where dost thou wander? Up stairs and down stairs, and in my lady's chamber; There I met an old man that would not say his prayers, I took him by his hind legs and threw him down stairs.

THE WIND

Arthur O'Bower has broken his band, He comes roaring up the land— A King of Scots, with all his power, Cannot turn Arthur of the Bower.

ONCE I SAW A LITTLE BIRD

Once I saw a little bird Come hop, hop, hop, So I said, "Little bird, Will you stop, stop, stop?"

I was going to the window To say, "How do you do?" But he shook his little tail And far away he flew.

RING-A-RING-A-ROSES

Ring-a-ring-a-roses, A pocket full of posies; Hush! hush! hush! hush! We're all tumbled down.

CROSS PATCH

Cross patch, Draw the latch, Sit by the fire and spin;

Take a cup, And drink it up, And call your neighbors in.

HAPPY LET US BE

Merry are the bells, and merry would they ring; Merry was myself, and merry could I sing; With a merry ding-dong, happy, gay, and free, And a merry sing-song, happy let us be!

Merry have we met, and merry have we been; Merry let us part, and merry meet again; With our merry sing-song, happy, gay, and free, And a merry ding-dong, happy let us be!

THE OLD WOMAN IN THE BASKET

There was an old woman tossed up in a basket, Nineteen times as high as the moon; Where she was going I couldn't but ask it For in her hand she carried a broom.

"Old woman, old woman, old woman, quoth I, O whither, O whither, O whither so high?" "To brush the cobwebs off the sky!" "Shall I go with thee?" "Aye, by-and-by."



THE FOX AND THE OLD GRAY GOOSE

The fox and his wife they had a great strife, They never ate mustard in all their whole life; They ate their meat without fork or knife, And loved to be picking a bone, e-ho!

The fox jumped up on a moonlight night, The stars they were shining, and all things bright. Oh, ho! said the fox, it's a very fine night For me to go through the town, e-ho!

The fox when he came to yonder stile, He lifted his lugs and he listened awhile; Oh, ho, said the fox, it's but a short mile From this unto yonder wee town, e-ho!

The fox when he came to the farmer's gate, Who should he see but the farmer's drake; I love you well for your master's sake, And long to be picking your bone, e-ho!

The gray goose she ran round the hay-stack. Oh, ho! said the fox, you are very fat; You'll grease my beard and ride on my back From this unto yonder wee town e-ho!

Old Gammer Hipple-hopple hopped out of bed, She opened the casement, and popped out her head. Oh! husband, oh! husband, the gray goose is dead, And the fox is gone through the town, oh!

Then the old man got up in his red cap, And swore he would catch the fox in a trap; But the fox was too cunning, and gave him the slip, And ran through the town, the town, e-oh!

When he got to the top of the hill, He blew his trumpet both loud and shrill, For joy that he was safe Through the town, e-oh!

When the fox came back to his den, He had young ones, both nine and ten. "You're welcome home, daddy; you may go again, If you bring us such nice meat from the town, e-oh!"



JACK AND JILL

Jack and Jill went up the hill, To draw a pail of water; Jack fell down and broke his crown, And Jill came tumbling after.

Up Jack got, and home did trot As fast as he could caper; Went to bed to mend his head, With vinegar and brown paper.

Jill came in, and she did grin To see his paper plaster; Mother, vexed, did whip her next For causing Jack's disaster.

WILLY BOY

Willy boy, Willy boy, where are you going? I will go with you if I may "I'm going to the meadow to see them a-mowing, I'm going to help them make the hay."

BONNY LASS

Bonny lass, bonny lass, wilt thou be mine? Thou shalt not wash dishes, nor yet serve the swine: Thou shalt sit on a cushion, and sew a fine seam, And thou shalt eat strawberries, sugar, and cream!

OH, WHERE ARE YOU GOING?

Oh, where are you going, My pretty maiden fair, With your red rosy cheeks, And your coal-black hair?

I'm going a-milking, Kind sir, says she, And it's dabbling in the dew Where you'll find me.

BOBBY SHAFTOE

Bobby Shaftoe's gone to sea, Silver buckles on his knee; He'll come back and marry me, Pretty Bobby Shaftoe.

Bobby Shaftoe's fat and fair, Combing down his yellow hair, He's my love for evermair, Pretty Bobby Shaftoe.

DING-DONG-BELL

Ding— Dong— Bell! Pussy's in the well. Who put her in? Little Johnny Green. Who pulled her out? Big Johnny Stout. What a naughty boy was that, To drown poor pussy cat, Who never did him any harm, And killed the mice in his father's barn.

LONDON BRIDGE

London bridge is broken down, Dance over my Lady Lee, London bridge is broken down, With a gay ladye.

How shall we build it up again? Dance over my Lady Lee, How shall we build it up again? With a gay ladye.

We'll build it up with gravel and stone, Dance over my Lady Lee, We'll build it up with gravel and stone, With a gay ladye.

Gravel and stone will be washed away, Dance over my Lady Lee, Gravel and stone will be washed away, With a gay ladye.

We'll build it up with iron and steel, Dance over my Lady Lee, We'll build it up with iron and steel, With a gay ladye.

Iron and steel will bend and break, Dance over my Lady Lee, Iron and steel will bend and break, With a gay ladye.

We'll build it up with silver and gold, Dance over my Lady Lee, We'll build it up with silver and gold, With a gay ladye.

Silver and gold will be stolen away, Dance over my Lady Lee, Silver and gold will be stolen away, With a gay ladye.

We'll set a man to watch it then, Dance over my Lady Lee, We'll set a man to watch it then, With a gay ladye.

We'll put a pipe within his mouth, Dance over my Lady Lee, We'll put a pipe within his mouth, With a gay ladye.



GREEN GRAVEL

All round the green gravel the grass grows so green, And all the pretty maids are fit to be seen, Wash them in milk, dress them in silk, And the first to go down shall be married in green.

OLD MOTHER HUBBARD

Old Mother Hubbard Went to the cupboard To get her poor dog a bone; But when she came there The cupboard was bare, And so the poor dog had none.

She went to the baker's To buy him some bread, But when she came back The poor dog was dead.

She went to the joiner's To buy him a coffin, But when she came back The poor dog was laughing.

She went to the butcher's To get him some tripe, But when she came back He was smoking his pipe.

She went to the hatter's To buy him a hat, But when she came back He was feeding the cat.

She went to the barber's To buy him a wig, But when she came back He was dancing a jig.

She went to the tailor's To buy him a coat, But when she came back He was riding a goat.

She went to the cobbler's To buy him some shoes, But when she came back He was reading the news.

She went to the seamstress To buy him some linen, But when she came back The dog was a-spinning.

She went to the hosier's To buy him some hose, But when she came back He was dressed in his clothes.

The dame made a curtsey, The dog made a bow; The dame said, "Your servant." The dog said, "Bow, wow."



LITTLE BO-PEEP

Little Bo-Peep, she lost her sheep, And can't tell where to find them; Leave them alone, and they'll come home, And bring their tails behind them.

Little Bo-peep fell fast asleep, And dreamed she heard them bleating; When she awoke she found it a joke, For they still were all fleeting.

Then up she took her little crook, Determined for to find them, She found them indeed, but it made her heart bleed, For they'd left their tails behind them!

It happened one day, as Bo-peep did stray Unto a meadow hard by— There she espied their tails side by side, All hung on a tree to dry.

She heaved a sigh and wiped her eye, Then went over hill and dale, And tried what she could, as a shepherdess should, To tack to each sheep its tail.

COME OUT TO PLAY

Boys and girls, come out to play, The moon does shine as bright as day; Leave your supper, and leave your sleep, And meet your playfellows in the street, Come with a whoop and come with a call, Come with a good will or not at all. Up the ladder and down the wall, A halfpenny roll will serve us all. You find milk and I'll find flour, And we'll have pudding in half an hour.

LITTLE ROBIN REDBREAST

Little Robin Redbreast sat upon a tree, Up went the Pussy-Cat, and down went he! Down came Pussy-Cat, away Robin ran, Says little Robin Redbreast—catch me if you can.

Little Robin Redbreast jumped upon a spade, Pussy-Cat jumped after him, and then he was afraid. Little Robin chirped and sung, and what did Pussy say? Pussy-Cat said Mew, mew, mew—and Robin flew away.

LITTLE BOY BLUE

Little Boy Blue, come blow your horn, The sheep's in the meadow, the cow's in the corn. What! Is this the way you mind your sheep, Under the haycock, fast asleep?

MY MAID MARY

My maid Mary She minds her dairy, While I go a-hoeing and mowing each morn. Merrily runs the reel And the little spinning-wheel While I am singing and mowing my corn.

BEGGARS ARE COME TO TOWN

Hark! Hark! The dogs do bark! The beggars are come to town;

Some in rags, Some in jags, And some in velvet gowns.

* * *

Bow-Wow-Wow! Whose Dog art thou? Little Tom Tinker's Dog, Bow-Wow-Wow!

BLOW, WIND, BLOW!

Blow, wind, blow! and go, mill, go! That the miller may grind his corn; That the baker may take it, And into rolls make it, And send us some hot in the morn.

BYE, BABY BUNTING

Bye, Baby bunting, Father's gone a-hunting, Mother's gone a-milking, Sister's gone a-silking, And Brother's gone to buy a skin, To wrap the Baby bunting in.

THREE LITTLE KITTENS

Three little kittens, they lost their mittens, And they began to cry: "O mother dear, We very much fear, That we have lost our mittens." Lost your mittens! You naughty kittens! Then you shall have no pie. "Mee-ow, mee-ow, mee-ow," No, you shall have no pie. "Mee-ow, mee-ow, mee-ow."

The three little kittens, they found their mittens, And they began to cry: "O mother dear, See here, see here! See! we have found our mittens." Put on your mittens You silly kittens, And you may have some pie. "Purr-r, purr-r, purr-r, O let us have the pie. Purr-r, purr-r, purr-r."

The three little kittens put on their mittens, And soon ate up the pie; "O mother dear, We greatly fear, That we have soiled our mittens." Soiled your mittens! You naughty kittens! Then they began to sigh, "Mee-ow, mee-ow, mee-ow." Then they began to sigh, "Mee-ow, mee-ow, mee-ow."

The three little kittens, they washed their mittens. And hung them out to dry; "O mother dear, Do you not hear, That we have washed our mittens?" Washed your mittens! Oh, you're good kittens. But I smell a rat close by; Hush! Hush! "Mee-ow, mee-ow. We smell a rat close by, Mee-ow, mee-ow, mee-ow."

TOM WAS A PIPER'S SON

Tom, Tom was a piper's son, He learned to play when he was young, And all the tune that he could play Was "Over the hills and far away." Over the hills, and a great way off, The wind will blow my top-knot off.

Now, Tom with his pipe made such a noise That he well pleased both the girls and boys, And they always stopped to hear him play "Over the hills and far away."

DAFFY-DOWN-DILLY

Daffy-down-dilly is new come to town, With a petticoat green, and a bright yellow gown, And her white blossoms are peeping around.

BILLY BOY

Oh, where have you been, Billy Boy, Billy Boy, Oh, where have you been, charming Billy? "I have been to seek a wife, She's the joy of my life, She's a young thing and cannot leave her mother."

What work can she do, Billy Boy, Billy Boy, What work can she do, charming Billy? "She can brew and she can bake, She can make a wedding cake— She's a young thing and cannot leave her mother."

Can she make a cherry pie, Billy Boy, Billy Boy, Can she make a cherry pie, charming Billy? "She can make a cherry pie Quick's cat can wink her eye— She's a young thing and cannot leave her mother."

How old is she, Billy Boy, Billy Boy, How old is she, charming Billy? "She is three times six, four times seven, Twenty-eight and eleven— She's a young thing and cannot leave her mother."

THREE WISE MEN OF GOTHAM

Three wise men of Gotham Went to sea in a bowl, And if the bowl had been stronger My song had been longer.

LITTLE TOMMY TUCKER

"Little Tommy Tucker, Sing for your supper." "What shall I sing?" "White bread and butter." "How shall I cut it Without any knife? How shall I marry Without any wife?"

PUSSY AND THE MICE

Nine little mice sat down to spin; Pussy passed by, and she peeped in. "What are you at, my little men?" "Making coats for gentlemen." "Shall I come in and bite off your threads?" "No, no, Miss Pussy, you'll snip off our heads."

WHEN I WAS A LITTLE BOY

When I was a little boy, I lived by myself, And all the bread and cheese I got I put upon a shelf; The rats and the mice, they made such a strife, I was forced to go to London to buy me a wife. The streets were so broad, and the lanes were so narrow, I was forced to bring my wife home in a wheelbarrow; The wheelbarrow broke, and my wife had a fall, And down came the wheelbarrow, wife, and all.

CHINESE MOTHER-GOOSE RHYMES

BY PROF ISAAC TAYLOR HEADLAND

LITTLE FAT BOY

What a bonny little fellow is this fat boy of mine! He makes people die of joy! What a fine little fellow is this fat boy of mine! Now whose is this loving little boy?



Do you want to buy a beauty? Do you want to buy a beauty? If you buy him he will watch your house, And do it as his duty.

And no matter as to servants, You may have them or may not, But you'll never need to lock your door, Or give your house a thought.



A FINGER TEST

You strike three times on the top, you see, And strike three times on the bottom for me, Then top and bottom you strike very fast, And open a door in the middle at last.



OUR BABY

Mrs. Chang, Mrs. Lee, Mama has a small babee; Stands up firm, Sits up straight, Won't eat milk, But lives on cake.





THE LITTLE GOLDEN SISTER

My little golden sister Rides a golden horse slow, And we'll use a golden whip If the horse doesn't go.

A little gold fish In a gold bowl we see, And a gold-colored bird On a gold-blossomed tree.

A gold-plated god In a gold temple stands, With a gold-plated baby In his gold-plated hands.

TEN FINGERS

(A Chinese finger-play)

Three horses are drinking, Three horses are feeding, The two men are fighting, The old woman pleading, The baby is crying, But no one is heeding.





A RIDDLE

A plum blossom foot, And a pudding face sweet; He's taller when he's sitting Than when standing on his feet.



THE FIVE FINGERS

(Another finger-play)

A great big brother, And a little brother so, A big bell-tower, And a temple and a show, And little baby wee, wee, Always wants to go.



LADYBUG

Ladybug, ladybug, Fly away, do; Fly to the mountain, And feed upon dew.

Feed upon dew, And sleep on a rug, And then run away Like a good little bug.





THE SPIDER

Oh, my dear brother spider, With your body big and red, From the eaves you are hanging On a single little thread.





THE GREAT WALL

The wily Emperor Tsin Chi-hwang He built a wall both great and strong. The steps were narrow, but the wall was stout, So it kept the troublesome Tartars out.



MOTHER GOOSE CONTINUED BY ANNA MARION SMITH



"Pussy cat, Pussy cat"

"Pussy cat, pussy cat, where have you been?" "I've been to London, to see the Queen." "Pussy cat, pussy cat, what did you there?" "I frightened a little mouse under the chair."

"What did you say when you'd made your best bow?" "I opened my mouth and remarked 'miaow.'" "What did the Queen say in answer to that?" "She screamed a little, and then she said, 'SCAT!'"

Little Boy Blue

"Little boy Blue, come blow your horn, The sheep's in the meadow, the cow's in the corn. Is this the way you mind your sheep,— Under the haystack, fast asleep?"

Little boy Blue, awake, awake, And see how merry your charges make! Through field and garden their course they steer, And the mischief they're doing,—oh dear, oh dear!

PAT-A-CAKE

"Pat-a-cake, pat-a-cake, baker's man Bake me a cake as quick as you can Pat it and prick it, and mark it with B, And put it in the oven for baby and me."

Hurry it, hurry it, baker's man; Bring it to us as quick as you can. I hope it has raisins by way of surprise, And little black currants that look just like eyes.

Here it comes, here it comes, baby mine. Never was cake that was half so fine; Brown as a berry, and hot from the pan,— Thank you, oh thank you, you good baker's man!

* * *

"Hickory, dickory, dock. The mouse ran up the clock, The clock struck one, The mouse ran down,— Hickory, dickory, dock."

Hickory, dickory, dock, Again he tried the clock, This time,—don't frown,— The clock ran down! Hickory, dickory, dock.

HOW MANY MILES TO BABYLON?

"HOW MANY MILES TO BABYLON? THREE SCORE MILES AND TEN CAN I GET THERE BY CANDLELIGHT? YES, AND BACK AGAIN."

How shall I go to Babylon? Who will tell me true? Oh, there are trains, and there are boats, And automobiles too.

And one may ride a bicycle, Or go in a balloon; Or one may travel on his feet And get there 'most as soon.

For trains go off the track, you see, And boats go down below; And automobiles go to smash In ways that none may know.

And tires of bicycles go pop, Balloons will go and balk, So taking all in all, I think If I were you, I'd walk.

Hark! Hark!

Hark, Hark the dogs do bark! The beggars have come to town. Some in rags, and some in tags, And some in velvet gowns.

Hear, hear, they're drawing near! Just hark to the tramp of feet! So haste about, set tables out, And get them food to eat.

Run, run, the turkey's done! I hope it is nicely dressed, For those who shirk and will not work Are sure to want the best.

There Was an Old Woman

"There was an old woman Who lived in a shoe, Who had so many children She didn't know what to do She gave them some broth Without any bread And whipped them all soundly And sent them to bed."



Now it happened that Santa Claus, Passing that way, Peeped into the shoe top And saw how they lay— With their round, rosy faces All shining with tears, And resolved to do something To comfort the dears.

So while they were sleeping In woful array, He bundled those children Right into his sleigh; And cracking his whip As his reindeers sped forth, Away they all flew To his home in the North.

What wonders he showed them, Such beautiful toys! Such dolls for the girls, And such drums for the boys! Such farms and such stables, Such monkeys and bears, Such dishes and tables And tiny dolls' chairs!

And when they had seen All the wonderful things Which each winter, at Christmas, Dear Santa Claus brings, He gave them, to make Their enchantment complete, Just all of the candy And cake they could eat.

When they told of their travels, Their mother, it seems, Only laughed, and declared They were nothing but dreams. I am sure, though, things must Have occurred as they say, Else why were they, all of them, Ill the next day?

Humpty Dumpty

"Humpty Dumpty sat on a wall. Humpty Dumpty had a great fall. All the King's horses and all the King's men Couldn't put Humpty Dumpty together again."

I There he lay, stretched out on the ground, While all the company gathered around; When, valiantly stifling his tears and his groans, He sadly addressed them in quavering tones.

II "Friends," said Humpty, wiping his eyes, "This sudden descent was an awful surprise. It inclines me to think,—you may laugh at my views,— That a seat that is humble is safest to choose.

III "All are not fitted to sit on a wall, Some have no balance, and some are too small; Many have tried it and found, as I guess, They've ended, like me, in a terrible mess.

IV "Hark, you horses, and all you king's men! Hear it, and never forget it again! 'Tis those who are patient in seats that are low, Who some day get up in high places and crow."

V Then they took him and put him to bed. I hope you'll remember the things that he said; For all the king's horses and all the king's men Never once thought of his sermon again.

The Queen of Hearts

"The Queen of Hearts, she made some tarts All on a summer's day The Knave of Hearts, he stole those tarts And with them ran away. The King of Hearts called for the tarts And beat the Knave full sore. The Knave of Hearts brought back the tarts, And vowed he'd steal no more."

This noble queen, with mind serene, Then made a mammoth cake. The naughty knave for cake did crave, And off with it did make. The haughty king, for punishing, Would have him eat it all, Which made the knave—unhappy slave— Too sick to speak or crawl.

Since then, at ease, their majesties Eat pastries every day. The knave affirms his stomach squirms, And looks the other way. Alas, alas, to such a pass Doth gluttony invite! 'Tis very sad to be so bad, And lose one's appetite.

Next day the queen, with lofty mien, Prepared some lovely pies. The feeble knave side-glances gave At them with longing eyes. The cruel king, with mocking fling, Said: "Do, now, have some pie!" The qualmish knave, no longer brave, Could only groan, "Not I."

One Misty Moisty Morning

"One misty, moisty morning When cloudy was the weather I chanced to meet an old man clothed all in leather. He began to compliment, and I began to grin, How do you do, and how do you do And how do you do again?"

This morning as I wandered To enjoy the charming weather, I met a man in goggles and a modern suit of leather. He began to toot a horn and I began to run, He knocked me flat nor cared for that; And down the road he spun.

OLD KING COLE

"Old King Cole was a merry old soul, And a merry old soul was he: He called for his pipe, and he called for his bowl, And he called for his fiddlers three. Every fiddler had a fine fiddle, And a very fine fiddle had he: (Twee-tweedle-dee, tweedle-dee, went the fiddlers three)— Oh, there's none so rare as can compare With King Cole and his fiddlers three!"

I Good Queen Kate was his royal mate, And a right royal mate was she: She would frequently state that carousing till late Was something that never should be. But every fiddler had such a fine fiddle,— Oh, such a fine fiddle had he,— That old King Cole, in his inmost soul, Was as restive as he could be.

II When thus spoke she to his majesty, He planted his crown on tight. "We will wait," whispered he to the fiddlers three, "Till the Queen has retired for the night." Every fiddler then tuned up his fiddle, And tuned it as true as could be: While old King Cole got his pipe and bowl And replenished them secretly.

III So gay they grew as the night hours flew, He forgot how the time sped away; Till swift overhead he heard the Queen's tread As she sprang out of bed, when he hurriedly said They might finish the tune the next day. Every fiddler he had a fine fiddle, And a very fine fiddle had he: Oh, 't was not fair such a concert rare Should be ended so suddenly!

PUSSY SITS BESIDE THE FIRE

"Pussy sits beside the fire How can she be fair? Then comes in the little dog. "Pussy, are you there? So so, dear Mistress Pussy, Pray tell me how you do?" "Indeed, I thank you little dog, I'm very well just now."

"Fy, pussy, what a lazy cat, On such a pleasant day To sit and drowse beside the fire And sleep the hours away! A self-respecting dog would think Himself a sorry cur, If he did nothing all day long But fold his arms and purr!"

"Now, sir, you needn't criticize Because I sit and blink, For while my eyes are shut, like this, I think, and think, and think. And when I purr, please understand I work with all my might, A-humming over songs I sing When I go out at night.

"Excuse me. Now I'll close my eyes, And think a little more. On busy days like this, I show My visitors the door. 'T is only little dogs who judge That one must idle be, Unless one's chasing round and round Or barking up a tree."

THE NORTH WIND DOTH BLOW

"The north wind doth blow, and we shall have snow, And what will the robin do then, poor thing? He'll sit in the barn and keep himself warm, And hide his head under his wing, poor thing."

But never a word of plaint will be heard From robin, no matter how tired and cold; For well will he know that the winter will go, And the blossoms and greenness of spring unfold.

And when the warm sun says winter is done, He'll gladden us all with his cheery song; And never will fret if the season is wet, Or wail that the winter was hard and long.

I HAD A LITTLE HUSBAND

"I had a little husband No bigger than my thumb, I put him in a pint pot, And there I bid him drum I bought a little handkerchief To wipe his little nose, And a pair of little garters To tie his little hose."

I bought a little carriage And took him out to ride, And yet with all my efforts He wasn't satisfied. I never would have married, Now this I do declare,— If I'd supposed a husband Was such an awful care.

There was a man in our town

"There was a man in our town, And he was wondrous wise He jumped into a bramble bush And scratched out both his eyes. And when he saw his eyes were out, With all his might and main He jumped into another bush And scratched them in again."

This clever man then hastened on And bought a pair of shears, But when he tried to cut with them, He snipped off both his ears. And when he heard his ears were off, ('T was told him o'er and o'er), He seized the shears and snipped them back As they had been before.

"Because," said he, "wise men like me, Who travel round about, And keep their eyes, and use them well, May find some people out. And if they also use their ears, And hark what hearsay brings, They're likewise pretty sure to hear Some very funny things."

SEE SAW, SACARADOWN

"See saw, sacaradown, Which is the way to Boston town? One foot up, the other foot down. That is the way to Boston town."

See saw, steady and slow! Other places there are, I know, But they are not worth the trouble to go, For Boston people have told me so.

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