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Familiar Quotations
by John Bartlett
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FAMILIAR QUOTATIONS:

A COLLECTION OF

PASSAGES, PHRASES, AND PROVERBS

TRACED TO THEIR SOURCES IN

ANCIENT AND MODERN LITERATURE

BY JOHN BARTLETT.

"I have gathered a posie of other men's flowers, and nothing but the thread that binds them is mine own."

NINTH EDITION.

BOSTON: LITTLE, BROWN, AND COMPANY. 1905.

Copyright, 1875, 1882, 1891, 1903, BY JOHN BARTLETT.

UNIVERSITY PRESS: JOHN WILSON AND SON, CAMBRIDGE, U.S.A.

THIS EDITION IS AFFECTIONATELY INSCRIBED TO THE MEMORY OF THE LATE ASSISTANT EDITOR,

REZIN A. WIGHT.



PREFACE.

"Out of the old fieldes cometh al this new corne fro yere to yere," And out of the fresh woodes cometh al these new flowres here.

THE small thin volume, the first to bear the title of this collection, after passing through eight editions, each enlarged, now culminates in its ninth,—and with it, closes its tentative life.

This extract from the Preface of the fourth edition is applicable to the present one:—

"It is not easy to determine in all cases the degree of familiarity that may belong to phrases and sentences which present themselves for admission; for what is familiar to one class of readers may be quite new to another. Many maxims of the most famous writers of our language, and numberless curious and happy turns from orators and poets, have knocked at the door, and it was hard to deny them. But to admit these simply on their own merits, without assurance that the general reader would readily recognize them as old friends, was aside from the purpose of this collection. Still, it has been thought better to incur the risk of erring on the side of fulness."

With the many additions to the English writers, the present edition contains selections from the French, and from the wit and wisdom of the ancients. A few passages have been admitted without a claim to familiarity, but solely on the ground of coincidence of thought.

I am under great obligations to M. H. MORGAN, Ph. D., of Harvard University, for the translation of Marcus Aurelius, and for the translation and selections from the Greek tragic writers. I am indebted to the kindness of Mr. DANIEL W. WILDER, of Kansas, for the quotations from Pilpay, with contributions from Diogenes Laertius, Montaigne, Burton, and Pope's Homer; to Dr. WILLIAM J. ROLFE for quotations from Robert Browning; to Mr. JAMES W. MCINTYRE for quotations from Coleridge, Shelley, Keats, Mrs. Browning, Robert Browning, and Tennyson. And I have incurred other obligations to friends for here a little and there a little.

It gives me pleasure to acknowledge the great assistance I have received from Mr. A. W. STEVENS, the accomplished reader of the University Press, as this work was passing through the press.

In withdrawing from this very agreeable pursuit, I beg to offer my sincere thanks to all who have assisted me either in the way of suggestions or by contributions; and especially to those lovers of this subsidiary literature for their kind appreciation of former editions.

Accepted by scholars as an authoritative book of reference, it has grown with its growth in public estimation with each reissue. Of the last two editions forty thousand copies were printed, apart from the English reprints. The present enlargement of text equals three hundred and fifty pages of the previous edition, and the index is increased with upwards of ten thousand lines.

CAMBRIDGE, March, 1891.



INDEX OF AUTHORS.

PAGE ADAMS, CHARLES F. 678 ADAMS, JOHN 429 JOHN, note 529, 530 ADAMS, JOHN QUINCY 312, 458 ADAMS, SARAH FLOWER 606 ADDISON, JOSEPH 297 ADY, THOMAS 684 AESCHINES 810 AESCHYLUS 695 AGRICOLA, note 686 AKENSIDE, MARK 391 ALANUS DE INSULIS, note 5 ALDRICH, JAMES 639 ALI BEN TALEB 767 ALLEN, ELIZABETH A. 668 ALPHONSO THE WISE 768 AMELIA, PRINCESS 676 AMES, FISHER, note 283 ARCHILOCHUS, note 216 ARIOSTO, note 552 ARISTIDES, note 438 ARISTOPHANES, note 731 ARISTOTLE, note 267, 853 ARMSTRONG, JOHN 672 ARNOLD, MATTHEW 665 ARNOLD, SAMUEL J., note 388 ARRIANUS, note 704 ATHENAEUS 766 AVONMORE, LORD, note 531

BACON, FRANCIS 164 BACON, LADY ANNE, note 7 BAILEY, PHILIP JAMES 654 BAILLIE, JOANNA 674 BANCROFT, GEORGE, note 531 BARBAULD, MRS. 433 BARERE, BERTRAND 804 BARHAM, R. H. 676 BARKER, THEODORE L. 682 BARNFIELD, RICHARD 175 BARRETT, EATON S. 676 BARRINGTON, GEORGE 445 BARROW, ISAAC, note 299 BARRY, MICHAEL J. 680 BASSE, WILLIAM, note 179 BAXTER, RICHARD 670 BAYARD, CHEVALIER, note 21 BAYLE, PETER, note 604 BAYLY, T. HAYNES 581 BEATTIE, JAMES 428 BEAUMONT AND FLETCHER 197 BEAUMONT, FRANCIS 196 BEAUMONT, JOHN, note 478 BEE, BERNARD E. 860 BELL, ROBERT, note 330 BELLAMY, G. W. 682 BELLINGHAUSEN, VON MUeNCH 806 BENTHAM, JEREMY 856 BENTLEY, RICHARD 284 BENTON, THOMAS H. 858 BERKELEY, BISHOP 312 BERNERS, JULIANA, note 182 BERRY, DOROTHY, note 484 BERTAUT, JEAN, note 100 BERTIN, MADEMOISELLE, note 811 BETTELHEIM, A. S., note 170 BICKERSTAFF, ISAAC 427 BLACKER, COLONEL 588 BLACKMORE, RICHARD, note 685 BLACKSTONE, SIR WILLIAM 392 BLAIR, ROBERT 354 BLAMIRE, SUSANNA 673 BLAND, ROBERT, note 191 BOBART, JACOB, note 688 BODINUS, note 418 BODLEY, SIR THOMAS 368 BOETHIUS, note 618 BOILEAU 799 BOLINGBROKE 304 BOOTH, BARTON 306 BORBONIUS, note 321 BOURDILLON, FRANCIS W. 669 BRACTON 857 BRAINARD, JOHN G. C. 677 BRAMSTON, JAMES 352 BREEN, H. H., note 409 BRERETON, JANE 312 BRETON, NICHOLAS, note 33 BROMLEY, ISAAC H. 681 BROOKE, LORD 35 BROUGHAM, LORD 527 LORD, note 426 BROWN, JOHN 380 BROWN, TOM 286 BROWNE, SIR THOMAS 217 BROWNE, WILLIAM 201 BROWNING, ELIZABETH B. 620 BROWNING, ROBERT 643 BRYANT, WILLIAM CULLEN 572 BRYDGES, SIR S. EGERTON 674 BUFFON, note 186 BULFINCH, SAMUEL G., note 488 BUNN, ALFRED 561 BUNSEN, CARL JOSIAS, note 770 BUNYAN, JOHN 265 BURCHARD, SAMUEL D. 679 BURKE, EDMUND 407 BURNET, GILBERT, note 610 BURNS, ROBERT 446 BURTON, ROBERT 185 BUSSY DE RABUTIN, note 286 BUTLER, SAMUEL 209 SAMUEL, note 361 BYRD, WILLIAM, note 22 BYROM, JOHN 351 BYRON, LORD 539

CALHOUN, JOHN C. 529 CALLIMACHUS 496 CAMPBELL, LORD, note 418, 528 CAMPBELL, THOMAS 512 CAMDEN, WILLIAM 684 CAMBRONNE 810 CANNING, GEORGE 464 CAREW, THOMAS 200 CAREY, HENRY 285 CARLYLE, THOMAS 577 CARPENTER, JOSEPH E. 680 CARRUTHERS, ROBERT, note 528 CATINAT, MARSHAL, note 740 CATULLUS, note 306 CENTLIVRE, SUSANNAH 671 CERVANTES 784 CHANNING, WILLIAM E. 655 CHAPMAN, GEORGE 35 CHARLES I., note 398 CHARRON, note 317 CHASE, SALMON P. 619 CHAUCER, GEOFFREY 1 CHERRY, ANDREW 453 CHESTERFIELD, EARL OF 352 CHILD, LYDIA MARIA 596 CHOATE, RUFUS 588 CHORLEY, HENRY F. 667 CHRISTY, DAVID 854 CHURCH, BENJAMIN, note 513 CHURCHILL, CHARLES 412 CIBBER, COLLEY 295 COLLEY, note 294 CICERO 705 CLARENDON, EDWARD HYDE 255 CLARKE, JOHN, note 568 CLARKE, MACDONALD 582 CLAY, HENRY, note 505 CLEVELAND, GROVER 669 CODRINGTON, CHRISTOPHER, note 295 COKE, SIR EDWARD 24 COLERIDGE, HARTLEY 677 COLERIDGE, S. TAYLOR 498 S. TAYLOR, note 481 COLLINS, WILLIAM 389 COLMAN, GEORGE 454 COLTON, C. C. 675 CONGREVE, WILLIAM 294 CONSTABLE, HENRY, note 484 CONSTANT, HENRY B. 806 COOK, ELIZA 654 COOPER, J. FENIMORE, note 580 CORNUEL, MADAME, note 740 COTTON, NATHANIEL 362 COWLEY, ABRAHAM 260 COWPER, WILLIAM 413 CRABBE, GEORGE 443 CRANCH, CHRISTOPHER P. 653 CRANFIELD, note 210 CRASHAW, RICHARD 258 CRAWFORD, ANNE 673 CRISTYNE, note 12 CROCKETT, DAVID 852 CROKER, JOHN W., note 284 CUNNINGHAM, ALLAN 537 CURRAN, JOHN P. 855 CURTIUS, QUINTUS, note 25

D'ABRANTES, DUC 806 D'ABRANTES, MADAME, note 718 DALRYMPLE, SIR JOHN, note 550 DANCE, CHARLES 677 DANIEL, SAMUEL 39 DANTE 769 DANTON, note 28 DARWIN, CHARLES 622 DARWIN, ERASMUS 424 ERASMUS, note 426 DAVENANT, SIR WILLIAM 217 DAVIE, ADAM, note 21 DAVIES, SCROPE 682 DAVIES, SIR JOHN 175 DAVIS, JEFFERSON 679 DAVIS, THOMAS O. 680 DE BENSERADE, ISAAC 794 DEBRETT, JOHN, note 432 DECATUR, STEPHEN 675 DE CAUX, note 396 DEFFAND, MADAME DU 801 DEFOE, DANIEL 286 DEKKER, THOMAS 181 DE LA FERTE, note 430 DE LIGNE 803 DE L'ISLE, JOSEPH R. 804 DEMODOCUS, note 400 DE MORGAN, note 290 DEMOSTHENES 855 DENHAM, SIR JOHN 257 DENMAN, LORD 527 DENNIS, JOHN 282 DE QUINCEY, note 365 DIBDIN, CHARLES 436 DIBDIN, THOMAS 675 DICKENS, CHARLES 652 DICKINSON, JOHN 426 DICKMAN, FRANKLIN J., note 589 DIDACUS STELLA, note 185 DIOGENES LAERTIUS 757 DIONYSIUS OF HALICARNASSUS, note 304 DIONYSIUS THE ELDER 700 DISRAELI, BENJAMIN 607 DIX, JOHN A. 678 DODDRIDGE, PHILIP 359 DODSLEY, ROBERT 671 DOMETT, ALFRED 642 DONNE, JOHN 177 DOWLING, BARTHOLOMEW 641 DRAKE, JOSEPH RODMAN 573 DRAYTON, MICHAEL 40 DRENNAN, WILLIAM 855 DRUMMOND, THOMAS 582 DRUMMOND, WILLIAM 196 WILLIAM note 170 DRYDEN, JOHN 267 DU BARTAS 780 DUFFERIN, LADY 611 DUMAS, ALEXANDRE 809 DUNCOMBE, LEWIS, note 459 D'URFEY, note 348 DWIGHT, TIMOTHY 674 DYER, EDWARD 22 DYER, JOHN 358 DYER —— 672

EASTWICK, note 437 EDGEWORTH, MARIA, note 283 EDWARDS, RICHARD 21 EDWARDS, THOMAS 671 EDWIN, JOHN 439 ELLIOT, JARED 392 ELLIOTT, JANE 393 ELLIS, GEORGE, note 175 ELLIS, HENRY 675 EMERSON, RALPH WALDO 598 RALPH WALDO, note 511 EMMET, ROBERT 675 ENGLISH, THOMAS DUNN 680 EPICTETUS 742 ERASMUS, note 3, 5, 216, 720 ESTIENNE, HENRI, note 379 EURIPIDES 697 EURIPIDES, note 277 EVERETT, DAVID 459 EVERETT, EDWARD 571

FABER, FREDERICK W. 653 FANSHAWE, CATHERINE M. 674 FARQUHAR, GEORGE 305 FENELON, note 353 FERRIAR, JOHN 456 FIELD, NATHANIEL 670 FIELDING, HENRY 362 FINCH, FRANCIS M. 668 FITZ-GEFFREY, CHARLES, note 305 FLETCHER, ANDREW 281 FLETCHER, JULIA A. 642 FLETCHER, JOHN 183 FLETCHER, PHINEAS, note 327 FOOTE, SAMUEL 391 FORD, JOHN 670 FORDYCE, JAMES 391 FORTESCUE, JOHN 7 FOUCHE, JOSEPH 805 FOURNIER, note 310 FOX, CHARLES J., note 364 FOX, JOHN, note 484 FRANCIS THE FIRST 807 FRANCK, RICHARD, note 305 FRANKLIN, BENJAMIN 359 FRANKLIN, KATE 682 FRENEAU, PHILIP 443 FRERE, J. HOOKHAM 462 FROTHINGHAM, RICHARD, note 360 FULLER, THOMAS 221 THOMAS, note 484

GAGE, THOMAS, note 495 GARRICK, DAVID 387 GARRISON, WILLIAM L. 605 GARTH, SAMUEL 295 SAMUEL, note 181 GASCOIGNE, GEORGE, note 10 GAY, JOHN 347 GETTY, REV. DR., note 631 GIBBON, EDWARD 430 GIBBONS, THOMAS 672 GIFFORD, RICHARD 393 GOETHE, WOLFGANG VON 803 GOLDSMITH, OLIVER 394 OLIVER, note 310, 592 GOOGE, BARNABY 5, 7 GORGIAS, note 578 GOSSON, STEPHEN, note 731 GOWER, JOHN, note 13 GRAFTON, RICHARD 684 GRANGER, JAMES, note 395 GRANT, ANNE 674 GRANT, ULYSSES S. 664 GRAVES, RICHARD 672 RICHARD, note 295 GRAY, THOMAS 381 GREEN, MATTHEW 354 GREENE, ALBERT G. 596 GREENE, ROBERT, note 190 GRESWELL, note 332 GREVILLE, MRS. 389 GRIFFIN, GERALD 678 GUALTIER, PHILLIPPE, note 64 GUARINI, note 495

HABINGTON, WILLIAM 515 HAKEWILL, GEORGE 683 GEORGE, note 169 HALE, EDWARD E. 681 HALIBURTON, THOMAS C. 580 HALL, BISHOP 182 HALL, ROBERT 457 HALLECK, FITZ-GREENE 561 HALLIWELL, JAMES O. 853 JAMES O., note 596 HAMILTON, ALEXANDER, note 532 HAMMOND, J. H. 678 HANNAH, J., note 22 HARE, JULIUS, note 268 HARRINGTON, SIR JOHN 39 HARRISON, WILLIAM 684 HARTE, FRANCIS BRET 669 HARVEY, STEPHEN 670 HAWKER, ROBERT 674 HAWKER, ROBERT S., note 687 HAYES, EDWARD, note 588 HAYES, RUTHERFORD B. 665 HEATH, LEONARD 666 HEBER, REGINALD 535 HEGGE, ROBERT, note 181 HEMANS, FELICIA D. 569 HENAULT, note 325 HENDYNG, note 7 HENRY, MATHEW 282 HENRY, PATRICK 429 HENSHAW, JOSEPH 263 HERBERT, GEORGE 204 HERODOTUS, note 696, 807 HERRICK, ROBERT 201 HERVEY, THOMAS K. 589 HESIOD 692 HEYWOOD, JOHN 8 HEYWOOD, THOMAS 194 HILL, AARON 313 HILL, ROWLAND 673 HIPPOCRATES 700 HOBBES, THOMAS 200 HOFFMAN, CHARLES F. 678 HOLCROFT, THOMAS 673 HOLLAND, SIR RICHARD 38 HOLMES, OLIVER WENDELL 635 HOME, JOHN 392 HOOD, THOMAS 583 HOOKER, JOSEPH 680 HOOKER, RICHARD 31 HOOPER, ELLEN STURGIS 654 HOPKINS, CHARLES, note 581 HOPKINSON, JOSEPH 465 HORACE 706 HORNE, BISHOP 853 HORNE, RICHARD H. 604 HOWARD, SAMUEL 672 HOWELL, JAMES, note 191, 208, 581 HOWITT, MARY 605 HOYLE, EDMUND 861 HUME, DAVID 854 DAVID, note 593, 685 HUNT, LEIGH 536 HURD, RICHARD 673 HURDIS, JAMES 454 HUTCHESON, FRANCIS 856

INGRAM, JOHN K. 681 IRVING, WASHINGTON 536

JACKSON, ANDREW 458 JAMES, G. P. R. 678 JAMES, PAUL M. 528 JEFFERSON, THOMAS 434 JEFFERYS, CHARLES 611 JERROLD, DOUGLAS 597 JOHNSON, ANDREW 678 JOHNSON, SAMUEL 365 SAMUEL, note 185, 294, 711 JONES, SIR WILLIAM 437 JONSON, BEN 177 JUVENAL 721

KEATS, JOHN 574 KEBLE, JOHN 569 KEMBLE, FRANCES ANNE 641 KEMBLE, J. P. 445 KEMPIS, THOMAS A 7 KEN, THOMAS 278 KENNEY, JAMES 676 KENRICK, WILLIAM, note 450 KEPLER, JOHN 670 KEY, FRANCIS S. 517 KEY, T. H., note 560 KING, WILLIAM, note 217 KINGLAKE, JOHN A. 860 KINGSLEY, CHARLES 664 KNIGHT, CHARLES, note 616 KNOLLES, RICHARD, note 267 KNOWLES, JAMES S. 676 KNOX, WILLIAM 561 KOTZEBUE, VON 805

LA FONTAINE 797 LAMB, CHARLES 508 CHARLES, note 274 LANDOR, WALTER S. 511 LANGFORD, G. W. 683 LANGHORNE, JOHN 427 LA ROCHEFOUCAULD 794 LAYARD, AUSTEN H. 642 LEE, HENRY 445 LEE, NATHANIEL 281 LEIGHTON, ARCHBISHOP, note 379 LEMON, MARK 679 LE SAGE 800 L'ESTRANGE, ROGER 670 LEUTSCH AND SCHNEIDEWIN, note 793 LIGNE, PRINCE DE 803 LINCOLN, ABRAHAM 622 LINLEY, GEORGE 586 LINSCHOTEN, HUGH VAN 861 LIVY, note 13 LLOYD, DAVID, note 310 LOCKHART, JOHN G. 677 JOHN G., note 427, 490 LOGAN, JOHN 438 LOGAU, FRIEDRICH VON 793 LONGFELLOW, HENRY W. 612 LOVELACE, RICHARD 259 LOVER, SAMUEL 582 LOWE, JOHN 673 LOWELL, JAMES RUSSELL 656 LOWTH, ROBERT 672 LUCRETIUS 706 LYDGATE, JOHN, note 5 LUTHER, MARTIN 770 LYLY, JOHN 31 LYTTELTON, LORD 377 LYTTON, SIR E. BULWER 606

MACAULAY, THOMAS B. 589 THOMAS B., note , 332, 610, 855 MACKAY, CHARLES 653 MACKINTOSH, JAMES 457 JAMES, note 291 MACKLIN, CHARLES 350 MADDEN, SAMUEL 314 MAHON, LORD 860 LORD, note 364, 474 MANNERS, LORD JOHN 680 MARCUS AURELIUS 749 MARCY, WILLIAM L. 676 MARKHAM, GERVASE, note 187 MARLOWE, CHRISTOPHER 40 MARMION, SHAKERLEY, note 171 MARTIAL 722 MARTIN, HENRI 807 MARVELL, ANDREW 262 MASON, WILLIAM 393 MASSINGER, PHILIP 194 MCMASTER, JOHN B., note 435 MAULE 857 MEE, WILLIAM 682 MELCHIOR, note 171 MENANDER, note 390 MERRICK, JAMES 390 MEURIER, GABRIEL, note 80 MICHELANGELO 769 MICKLE, WILLIAM J. 426 MIDDLETON, THOMAS 172 MILLER, WILLIAM 679 MILMAN, HENRY HART 564 MILNES, RICHARD M. 634 MILTON, JOHN 223 MIMNERMUS 699 MINER, CHARLES 528 MOLIERE 797 MONNOYE, BERNARD DE LA, note 400 MONTAGU, MARY WORTLEY 350 MARY WORTLEY, note 461 MONTAIGNE 774 MONTGOMERY, JAMES 496 MONTGOMERY, ROBERT 610 MONTROSE, MARQUIS OF 257 MOORE, CLEMENT C. 527 MOORE, EDWARD 377 MOORE, THOMAS 518 MORE, HANNAH 437 MORE, SIR THOMAS, note 30, 100 MORELL, THOMAS, note 281 MORGAN, M. H. 860 MORRIS, CHARLES 432 MORRIS, GEORGE P. 595 MORTON, THOMAS 457 MOSS, THOMAS 433 MOTHERWELL, WILLIAM 580 MUHLENBERG, WILLIAM A. 678 MULOCK, DINAH M. 667 MUeNSTER, ERNST F. 807 MURPHY, ARTHUR 393

NAIRNE, LADY 458 NAPIER, SIR W. F. P. 537 NAPOLEON BONAPARTE 811 NAPOLEON, LOUIS 810 NASH, THOMAS 861 NELSON, HORATIO 446 NEWTON, ISAAC 278 NOEL, THOMAS 683 NORRIS, JOHN 281 NORTHBROOKE, note 17 NORTON, CAROLINE E. S. 679

O'HARA, KANE 672 O'HARA, THEODORE 681 O'KEEFE, JOHN 673 O'KELLEY, CAPTAIN 855 OLDHAM, JOHN 366 OLDYS, WILLIAM 671 OLIPHANT, THOMAS, note 685 OMAR KHAYYAM 768 O'MEARA, BARRY E. 675 ORRERY, ROGER B., note 258 ORTIN, JOB, note 359 OTWAY, THOMAS 280 OVERBURY, SIR THOMAS 193 OVID 707 OXENSTIERN, note 195

PAINE, ROBERT TREAT 675 PAINE, THOMAS 431 THOMAS, note 605 PALEY, WILLIAM 673 PANAT, CHEVALIER DE 811 PARDOE, JULIA 680, 860 PARKER, MARTYN 176 PARKER, THEODORE 639 PARNELL, THOMAS 305 PASCAL 798 PASCAL, note 169 PAYNE, J. HOWARD 568 PEELE, GEORGE 24, 184, 530 PERCIVAL, JAMES G. 677 PERCY, THOMAS 404 PERRY, OLIVER H. 676 PERSIUS, note 188, 305 PETRARCH, note 295 PHAEDRUS 715 PHILIPS, AMBROSE 671 PHILIPS, JOHN 671 PHILLIPS, CHARLES 677 PHILLIPS, WENDELL 641 PHILOSTRATUS, note 179 PIERPONT, JOHN 538 PILPAY 691 PINCKNEY, CHARLES C. 673 PIOZZI, MADAME, note 560, 806 PITT, EARL OF CHATHAM 364 PITT, WILLIAM 453 PITT, WILLIAM (THE YOUNGER) 510 PLATO, note 317 PLAUTUS 700 PLAYFORD, JOHN 684 PLINY THE ELDER 716 PLINY THE YOUNGER 748 PLUTARCH 722 POE, EDGAR A. 640 POLLOK, ROBERT 588 POMFRET, JOHN 289 POMPADOUR, MADAME DE, note 205 POPE, ALEXANDER 314 POPE, WALTER 670 PORTER, HORACE 682 PORTER, MRS. DAVID 682 PORTEUS, BEILBY 425 POTTER, HENRY C. 668 POWELL, SIR JOHN 278 PRAED, WINTHROP M. 595 PRIESTLEY, JOSEPH 858 PRIOR, JAMES, note 412 PRIOR, MATTHEW 287 PROCLUS, note 740, 811 PROCTER, BRYAN W. 538 PUBLIUS SYRUS 708 PULTENEY, WILLIAM 671

QUARLES, FRANCIS 203 QUINCY, JOSIAH, JR. 436 QUINCY, JOSIAH 505 QUINTILIAN 721 QUITARD, note 176

RABELAIS 770 RACINE, note 391, 704 RADCLIFFE, ANN 456 RALEIGH, SIR WALTER 25 RAMSAY, ALLAN 671 RANDALL, H. S. 859 RANKE, LEOPOLD, note 770 RANSFORD, EDWIN 683 RASPE, note 739 RAVENSCROFT, THOMAS 683 RAY, WILLIAM, note 216 RHODES, WILLIAM B. 388 RICHARDS, AMELIA B., note 533 ROBINSON, MARY 674 ROCHESTER, EARL OF 279 ROGERS, SAMUEL 455 ROLAND, MADAME 804 ROSCOMMON, EARL OF 278 ROUSSEAU 802 ROWE, NICHOLAS 301 ROYDON, MATHEW 23 RUMBOLD, RICHARD 682 RUSSELL, W. S. 860

SAINT AUGUSTINE 767 SAINT SIMON, note 189 SALA, GEORGE A., note 463 SALES, SAINT FRANCIS DE, note 372 SALIS, VON 805 SALLUST, note 167 SALVANDY, COMTE DE 811 SANDYS, SIR EDWIN, note 314 SARGENT, EPES 679 SAVAGE, RICHARD 354 SCARRON, note 216 SCHELLING 807 SCHIDONI 793 SCHILLER 804 SCOTT, SIR WALTER 487 SIR WALTER, note 852 SCOTT, WINFIELD 676 SEARS, EDMUND H. 640 SEBASTIANI, GENERAL 809 SEDAINE, MICHEL J. 803 SEDLEY, CHARLES 671 SELDEN, JOHN 194 SELVAGGI, note 271 SENECA 714 SEVIGNE, MADAME DE, note 740, 801 SEWALL, HARRIET W. 680 SEWALL, JONATHAN M. 439 SEWARD, THOMAS, note 189 SEWARD, WILLIAM H. 595 SEWELL, GEORGE 671 SHAFTESBURY, EARL OF, note 578 SHAKESPEARE, WILLIAM 42 SHARMAN, JULIAN, note 12 SHEFFIELD 279 SHELLEY, PERCY B. 564 PERCY B., note 592 SHENSTONE, WILLIAM 379 SHERES, SIR HENRY, note 13 SHERMAN, WILLIAM T. 681 SHERIDAN, R. BRINSLEY 440 SHIRLEY, JAMES 209 SIDNEY, ALGERNON 264 SIDNEY, SIR PHILIP 34 SILIUS ITALICUS, note 207 SIRMOND, JOHN 793 SISMONDI 807 SKELTON, JOHN 8 SMART, CHRISTOPHER 363 SMITH, ADAM 858 SMITH, ALEXANDER 667 SMITH, CAPTAIN JOHN, note 495 SMITH, EDMUND, note 333 SMITH, HORACE 517 SMITH, JAMES 510 SMITH, SAMUEL F. 619 SMITH, SEBA 568 SMITH, SYDNEY 459 SMOLLETT, TOBIAS 392 SMYTH, WILLIAM, note 391 SOCRATES, note 63 SOMERVILLE, WILLIAM, note 314 SOPHOCLES 696 SOPHOCLES, note 593 SORBIENNE, note 286 SOUTH, ROBERT, note 310 SOUTHERNE, THOMAS 282 SOUTHEY, ROBERT 506, 853 SOUTHWELL, ROBERT, note 22 SPARKS, JARED, note 717 SPENCER, HERBERT 681 SPENCER, WILLIAM R. 464 SPENSER, EDMUND 27 SPRAGUE, CHARLES 564 STAEL, MADAME DE, note 174, 807 STEELE, SIR RICHARD 297 STEERS, FANNY 682 STERNE, LAURENCE 378 STERNHOLD, THOMAS 23 STEVENS, GEORGE A. 672 STILES, EZRA 859 STILL, BISHOP 22 STOLBERG, CHRISTIAN, note 503 STORY, JOSEPH 675 STOUGHTON, WILLIAM 266 STOWELL, LORD 437 SUCKLING, SIR JOHN 256 SUETONIUS, note 307 SUMNER, CHARLES 859 SWIFT, JONATHAN 289

TACITUS 747 TALFOURD, THOMAS N. 577 TANEY, ROGER B. 675 TATE AND BRADY 851 TAYLOR, BAYARD 666 TAYLOR, HENRY 594 TAYLOR, JANE AND ANN 534 TAYLOR, JEREMY, note 169, 193 TAYLOR, JOHN 670 JOHN, note 20 TEMPLE, SIR WILLIAM 266 TENNYSON, ALFRED 623 TERENCE 702 TERTULLIAN 756 THEOBALD, LOUIS 352 THEOCRITUS, note 349 THEOGNIS 694 THOMAS, FREDERICK W. 679 THOMSON, JAMES 355 THRALE, MRS. 432 THUCYDIDES, note 726 THURLOW, LORD 426 TIBULLUS, note 106 TICKELL, THOMAS 313 TILLOTSON, JOHN 266 TITUS, COLONEL, note 352 TOBIN, JOHN 463 TOLOWIEZ, note 767 TOPLADY, AUGUSTUS M., note 432 TOURNEUR, CYRIL 34 TOWNLEY, JAMES 380 TRUMBULL, JOHN 439 TUCKER, DEAN 858 TUKE, SAMUEL 670 TUPPER, MARTIN F. 640 TUSSER, THOMAS 20

UHLAND, JOHANN L. 806 UNKNOWN AUTHORS 707 USTERI, J. M. 805

VALERIUS MAXIMUS 622 VANBRUGH, SIR JOHN 684 VAN BUREN, MARTIN, note 364 VANDYK, H. S. 678 VARRO, note 167 VAUGHAN, HENRY 263 VAUVENARGUES 803 VEGETIUS, note 425 VENNING, RALPH 262 VILLON 769 VIRGIL, note 185, 720, 810 VOLNEY, note 592 VOLTAIRE 800 VOSS, J. H., note 811

WADE, J. A. 594 WALKER, WILLIAM 265 WALLACE, HORACE B., note 361 WALLER, EDMUND 219 WALPOLE, HORACE 389 HORACE, note 592 WALPOLE, SIR ROBERT 304 SIR ROBERT, note 592 WALTON, IZAAK 206 WARBURTON, THOMAS 859 WARNER, WILLIAM 38 WARD, THOMAS 857 WARTON, THOMAS 403 WASHINGTON, GEORGE 425 WATSON, WILLIAM 855 WATTS, ISAAC 301 WEBSTER, DANIEL 529 WEBSTER, JOHN 180 WELBY, AMELIA B. 681 WELLINGTON, DUKE OF 463 WELLS, WILLIAM V. 858 WESLEY, CHARLES 672 WESLEY, JOHN 359 WHETSTONE, GEORGE, note 14 WHEWELL, WILLIAM 169 WHITE, HENRY KIRKE, note 592 WHITTIER, JOHN G. 618 WIGHT, REZIN A. 854 WILDE, RICHARD H. 677 WILLARD, EMMA 676 WILLIAMS, HELEN M. 674 WILLIAMS, ROGER 208 WILLIS, NATHANIEL P. 655 NATHANIEL P., note 580 WILSON, ALEXANDER 860 WILSON, JOHN, note 558 WILSON, MRS. C. B. 677 WINSLOW, EDWARD, note 283 WINTHROP, JOHN 670 WINTHROP, ROBERT C. 638 WITHER, GEORGE 199 WOLCOT, JOHN 431 WOLFE, CHARLES 563 WOLFE, JAMES 673 WOODWORTH, SAMUEL 537 WORDSWORTH, WILLIAM 465 WOTTON, SIR HENRY 174 WROTHER, MISS 683 WYCHERLEY, WILLIAM, note 452

YALDEN, THOMAS, note 181 YONGE, NICHOLAS, note 711 YOUNG, EDWARD 306 YOUNG, SIR JOHN, note 177

ZAMOYSKI, JAN 810 ZOUCH, THOMAS, note 209



ANONYMOUS BOOKS CITED.

PAGE ANNALS OF SPORTING 855 BIOGRAPHIA BRITANNICA, note 282 BIOGRAPHIA DRAMATICA, note 347 BOOK OF COMMON PRAYER 850 BRITISH PRINCES 685 CUPID'S WHIRLIGIG, note 446 DEUTSCHE RECHTS ALTERTHUeMER 858 DRUNKEN BARNABY'S FOUR JOURNEYS 856 ENCYCLOPAEDIA BRITANNICA, note 784 GESTA ROMANORUM 802 HEALTH TO THE GENTLE PROFESSION OF SERVING-MEN, note 360 HISTORY OF THE FAMILY OF COURTENAY, note 802 LETTERS OF JUNIUS 688 MARRIAGE OF WIT AND WISDOM 859 MENAGIANA, note 793 NEW ENGLAND PRIMER 687 PIERRE PATELIN, note 771 REGIMEN SANITATIS SALERNITANUM, note 293 RETURN FROM PARNASSUS 684 SPECTATOR 857 THE BIBLE 812 THE EXAMINER, MAY 31, 1829, note 313 THE MOCK ROMANCE, note 217 THE NATION, note 532 THE SKYLARK 854 WHEELER'S MAGAZINE, note 690



FAMILIAR QUOTATIONS.



GEOFFREY CHAUCER. 1328-1400.

(From the text of Tyrwhitt.)

WHANNE that April with his shoures sote The droughte of March hath perced to the rote.

Canterbury Tales. Prologue. Line 1.

And smale foules maken melodie, That slepen alle night with open eye, So priketh hem nature in hir corages; Than longen folk to gon on pilgrimages.

Canterbury Tales. Prologue. Line 9.

And of his port as meke as is a mayde.

Canterbury Tales. Prologue. Line 69.

He was a veray parfit gentil knight.

Canterbury Tales. Prologue. Line 72.

He coude songes make, and wel endite.

Canterbury Tales. Prologue. Line 95.

Ful wel she sange the service devine, Entuned in hire nose ful swetely; And Frenche she spake ful fayre and fetisly, After the scole of Stratford atte bowe, For Frenche of Paris was to hire unknowe.

Canterbury Tales. Prologue. Line 122.

A Clerk ther was of Oxenforde also.

Canterbury Tales. Prologue. Line 287.

For him was lever han at his beddes hed A twenty bokes, clothed in black or red, Of Aristotle, and his philosophie, Than robes riche, or fidel, or sautrie. But all be that he was a philosophre, Yet hadde he but litel gold in cofre.

Canterbury Tales. Prologue. Line 295.

And gladly wolde he lerne, and gladly teche.

Canterbury Tales. Prologue. Line 310.

Nowher so besy a man as he ther n' as, And yet he semed besier than he was.

Canterbury Tales. Prologue. Line 323.

His studie was but litel on the Bible.

Canterbury Tales. Prologue. Line 440.

For gold in phisike is a cordial; Therefore he loved gold in special.

Canterbury Tales. Prologue. Line 445.

Wide was his parish, and houses fer asonder.

Canterbury Tales. Prologue. Line 493.

This noble ensample to his shepe he yaf,— That first he wrought, and afterwards he taught.

Canterbury Tales. Prologue. Line 498.

But Cristes lore, and his apostles twelve, He taught; but first he folwed it himselve.

Canterbury Tales. Prologue. Line 529.

And yet he had a thomb of gold parde.[2-1]

Canterbury Tales. Prologue. Line 565.

Who so shall telle a tale after a man, He moste reherse, as neighe as ever he can, Everich word, if it be in his charge, All speke he never so rudely and so large; Or elles he moste tellen his tale untrewe, Or feinen thinges, or finden wordes newe.

Canterbury Tales. Prologue. Line 733.

For May wol have no slogardie a-night. The seson priketh every gentil herte, And maketh him out of his slepe to sterte.

Canterbury Tales. The Knightes Tale. Line 1044.

That field hath eyen, and the wood hath ears.[2-2]

Canterbury Tales. The Knightes Tale. Line 1524.

Up rose the sonne, and up rose Emelie.

Canterbury Tales. The Knightes Tale. Line 2275.

Min be the travaille, and thin be the glorie.

Canterbury Tales. The Knightes Tale. Line 2408.

To maken vertue of necessite.[3-1]

Canterbury Tales. The Knightes Tale. Line 3044.

And brought of mighty ale a large quart.

Canterbury Tales. The Milleres Tale. Line 3497.

Ther n' is no werkman whatever he be, That may both werken wel and hastily.[3-2] This wol be done at leisure parfitly.[3-3]

Canterbury Tales. The Marchantes Tale. Line 585.

Yet in our ashen cold is fire yreken.[3-4]

Canterbury Tales. The Reves Prologue. Line 3880.

The gretest clerkes ben not the wisest men.

Canterbury Tales. The Reves Tale. Line 4051.

So was hire joly whistle wel ywette.

Canterbury Tales. The Reves Tale. Line 4153.

In his owen grese I made him frie.[3-5]

Canterbury Tales. The Reves Tale. Line 6069.

And for to see, and eek for to be seie.[3-6]

Canterbury Tales. The Wif of Bathes Prologue. Line 6134.

I hold a mouses wit not worth a leke, That hath but on hole for to sterten to.[4-1]

Canterbury Tales. The Wif of Bathes Prologue. Line 6154.

Loke who that is most vertuous alway, Prive and apert, and most entendeth ay To do the gentil dedes that he can, And take him for the gretest gentilman.

Canterbury Tales. The Wif of Bathes Tale. Line 6695.

That he is gentil that doth gentil dedis.[4-2]

Canterbury Tales. The Wif of Bathes Tale. Line 6752.

This flour of wifly patience.

Canterbury Tales. The Clerkes Tale. Part v. Line 8797.

They demen gladly to the badder end.

Canterbury Tales. The Squieres Tale. Line 10538.

Therefore behoveth him a ful long spone, That shall eat with a fend.[4-3]

Canterbury Tales. The Squieres Tale. Line 10916.

Fie on possession, But if a man be vertuous withal.

Canterbury Tales. The Frankeleines Prologue. Line 10998.

Truth is the highest thing that man may keep.

Canterbury Tales. The Frankeleines Tale. Line 11789.

Full wise is he that can himselven knowe.[4-4]

Canterbury Tales. The Monkes Tale. Line 1449.

Mordre wol out, that see we day by day.[5-1]

Canterbury Tales. The Nonnes Preestes Tale. Line 15058.

But all thing which that shineth as the gold Ne is no gold, as I have herd it told.[5-2]

Canterbury Tales. The Chanones Yemannes Tale. Line 16430.

The firste vertue, sone, if thou wilt lere, Is to restreine and kepen wel thy tonge.

Canterbury Tales. The Manciples Tale. Line 17281.

The proverbe saith that many a smale maketh a grate.[5-3]

Canterbury Tales. Persones Tale.

Of harmes two the lesse is for to cheese.[5-4]

Troilus and Creseide. Book ii. Line 470.

Right as an aspen lefe she gan to quake.

Troilus and Creseide. Book ii. Line 1201.

For of fortunes sharpe adversite, The worst kind of infortune is this,— A man that hath been in prosperite, And it remember whan it passed is.

Troilus and Creseide. Book iii. Line 1625.

He helde about him alway, out of drede, A world of folke.

Troilus and Creseide. Book iii. Line 1721.

One eare it heard, at the other out it went.[6-1]

Troilus and Creseide. Book iv. Line 435.

Eke wonder last but nine deies never in toun.[6-2]

Troilus and Creseide. Book iv. Line 525.

I am right sorry for your heavinesse.

Troilus and Creseide. Book v. Line 146.

Go, little booke! go, my little tragedie!

Troilus and Creseide. Book v. Line 1798.

Your duty is, as ferre as I can gesse.

The Court of Love. Line 178.

The lyfe so short, the craft so long to lerne,[6-3] Th' assay so hard, so sharpe the conquering.

The Assembly of Fowles. Line 1.

For out of the old fieldes, as men saithe, Cometh al this new corne fro yere to yere; And out of old bookes, in good faithe, Cometh al this new science that men lere.

The Assembly of Fowles. Line 22.

Nature, the vicar of the Almightie Lord.

The Assembly of Fowles. Line 379.

O little booke, thou art so unconning, How darst thou put thy-self in prees for drede?

The Flower and the Leaf. Line 59.

Of all the floures in the mede, Than love I most these floures white and rede, Soch that men callen daisies in our toun.

Prologue of the Legend of Good Women. Line 41.

That well by reason men it call may The daisie, or els the eye of the day, The emprise, and floure of floures all.

Prologue of the Legend of Good Women. Line 183.

For iii may keep a counsel if twain be away.[6-4]

The Ten Commandments of Love.

FOOTNOTES:

[2-1] In allusion to the proverb, "Every honest miller has a golden thumb."

[2-2] Fieldes have eies and woodes have eares.—HEYWOOD: Proverbes, part ii. chap. v.

Wode has erys, felde has sigt.—King Edward and the Shepard, MS. Circa 1300.

Walls have ears.—HAZLITT: English Proverbs, etc. (ed. 1869) p. 446.

[3-1] Also in Troilus and Cresseide, line 1587.

To make a virtue of necessity.—SHAKESPEARE: Two Gentlemen of Verona, act iv. sc. 2. MATTHEW HENRY: Comm. on Ps. xxxvii. DRYDEN: Palamon and Arcite.

In the additions of Hadrianus Julius to the Adages of Erasmus, he remarks, under the head of Necessitatem edere, that a very familiar proverb was current among his countrymen,—"Necessitatem in virtutem commutare" (To make necessity a virtue).

Laudem virtutis necessitati damus (We give to necessity the praise of virtue).—QUINTILIAN: Inst. Orat. i. 8. 14.

[3-2] Haste makes waste.—HEYWOOD: Proverbs, part i. chap. ii.

Nothing can be done at once hastily and prudently.—PUBLIUS SYRUS: Maxim 357.

[3-3] Ease and speed in doing a thing do not give the work lasting solidity or exactness of beauty.—PLUTARCH: Life of Pericles.

[3-4] E'en in our ashes live their wonted fires.—GRAY: Elegy, Stanza 23.

[3-5] Frieth in her own grease.—HEYWOOD: Proverbs, part i. chap. xi.

[3-6] To see and to be seen.—BEN JONSON: Epithalamion, st. iii. line 4. GOLDSMITH: Citizen of the World, letter 71.

Spectatum veniunt, veniunt spectentur ut ipsae (They come to see; they come that they themselves may be seen).—OVID: The Art of Love, i. 99.

[4-1] Consider the little mouse, how sagacious an animal it is which never entrusts his life to one hole only.—PLAUTUS: Truculentus, act iv. sc. 4.

The mouse that always trusts to one poor hole Can never be a mouse of any soul.

POPE: Paraphrase of the Prologue, line 298.

[4-2] Handsome is that handsome does.—GOLDSMITH: Vicar of Wakefield, chap. i.

[4-3] Hee must have a long spoon, shall eat with the devill.—HEYWOOD: Proverbes, part ii. chap. v.

He must have a long spoon that must eat with the devil.—SHAKESPEARE: Comedy of Errors, act iv. sc. 3.

[4-4] Thales was asked what was very difficult; he said, "To know one's self."—DIOGENES LAERTIUS: Thales, ix.

Know then thyself, presume not God to scan; The proper study of mankind is man.

POPE: Epistle ii. line 1.

[5-1] Murder, though it have no tongue, will speak With most miraculous organ.

SHAKESPEARE: Hamlet, act ii. sc. 2.

[5-2] Tyrwhitt says this is taken from the Parabolae of ALANUS DE INSULIS, who died in 1294,—Non teneas aurum totum quod splendet ut aurum (Do not hold everything as gold which shines like gold).

All is not golde that outward shewith bright.—LYDGATE: On the Mutability of Human Affairs.

Gold all is not that doth golden seem.—SPENSER: Faerie Queene, book ii. canto viii. st. 14.

All that glisters is not gold.—SHAKESPEARE: Merchant of Venice, act ii. sc. 7. GOOGE: Eglogs, etc., 1563. HERBERT: Jacula Prudentum.

All is not gold that glisteneth.—MIDDLETON: A Fair Quarrel, verse 1.

All, as they say, that glitters is not gold.—DRYDEN: The Hind and the Panther.

Que tout n'est pas or c'on voit luire (Everything is not gold that one sees shining).—Li Diz de freire Denise Cordelier, circa 1300.

[5-3] Many small make a great.—HEYWOOD: Proverbes. part i. chap. xi.

[5-4] Of two evils the less is always to be chosen.—THOMAS A KEMPIS: Imitation of Christ, book ii. chap. xii. HOOKER: Polity, book v. chap. lxxxi.

Of two evils I have chose the least.—PRIOR: Imitation of Horace.

E duobus malis minimum eligendum (Of two evils, the least should be chosen).—ERASMUS: Adages. CICERO: De Officiis, iii. 1.

[6-1] Went in at the tone eare and out at the tother.—HEYWOOD: Proverbes, part ii. chap. ix.

[6-2] This wonder lasted nine daies.—HEYWOOD: Proverbes, part ii. chap. i.

[6-3] Ars longa, vita brevis (Art is long: life is brief).—HIPPOCRATES: Aphorism i.

[6-4] Three may keepe counsayle, if two be away.—HEYWOOD: Proverbes, part ii. chap. v.



THOMAS A KEMPIS. 1380-1471.

Man proposes, but God disposes.[7-1]

Imitation of Christ. Book i. Chap. 19.

And when he is out of sight, quickly also is he out of mind.[7-2]

Imitation of Christ. Book i. Chap. 23.

Of two evils, the less is always to be chosen.[7-3]

Imitation of Christ. Book iii. Chap. 12.

FOOTNOTES:

[7-1] This expression is of much greater antiquity. It appears in the Chronicle of Battel Abbey, p. 27 (Lower's translation), and in The Vision of Piers Ploughman, line 13994. ed. 1550.

A man's heart deviseth his way; but the Lord directeth his steps.—Proverbs xvi. 9.

[7-2] Out of syght, out of mynd.—GOOGE: Eglogs. 1563.

And out of mind as soon as out of sight.

Lord BROOKE: Sonnet lvi.

Fer from eze, fer from herte, Quoth Hendyng.

HENDYNG: Proverbs, MSS. Circa 1320.

I do perceive that the old proverbis be not alwaies trew, for I do finde that the absence of my Nath. doth breede in me the more continuall remembrance of him.—Anne Lady Bacon to Jane Lady Cornwallis, 1613.

On page 19 of The Private Correspondence of Lady Cornwallis, Sir Nathaniel Bacon speaks of the owlde proverbe, "Out of sighte, out of mynde."

[7-3] See Chaucer, page 5.



JOHN FORTESCUE. Circa 1395-1485.

Moche Crye and no Wull.[7-4]

De Laudibus Leg. Angliae. Chap. x.

Comparisons are odious.[7-5]

De Laudibus Leg. Angliae. Chap. xix.

FOOTNOTES:

[7-4] All cry and no wool.—BUTLER: Hudibras, part i. canto i. line 852.

[7-5] CERVANTES: Don Quixote (Lockhart's ed.), part ii. chap. i. LYLY: Euphues, 1580. MARLOWE: Lust's Dominion, act iii. sc. 4. BURTON: Anatomy of Melancholy, part iii. sec. 3. THOMAS HEYWOOD: A Woman killed with Kindness (first ed. in 1607), act i. sc. 1. DONNE: Elegy, viii. HERBERT: Jacula Prudentum. GRANGE: Golden Aphrodite.

Comparisons are odorous.—SHAKESPEARE: Much Ado about Nothing, act iii. sc. 5.



JOHN SKELTON. Circa 1460-1529.

There is nothynge that more dyspleaseth God, Than from theyr children to spare the rod.[8-1]

Magnyfycence. Line 1954.

He ruleth all the roste.[8-2]

Why Come ye not to Courte. Line 198.

In the spight of his teeth.[8-3]

Colyn Cloute. Line 939.

He knew what is what.[8-4]

Colyn Cloute. Line 1106.

By hoke ne by croke.[8-5]

Colyn Cloute. Line 1240.

The wolfe from the dore.

Colyn Cloute. Line 1531.

Old proverbe says, That byrd ys not honest That fyleth hys owne nest.[8-6]

Poems against Garnesche.

FOOTNOTES:

[8-1] He that spareth the rod hateth his son.—Proverbs xiii. 24.

They spare the rod and spoyl the child.—RALPH VENNING: Mysteries and Revelations (second ed.), p. 5. 1649.

Spare the rod and spoil the child.—BUTLER: Hudibras, pt. ii. c. i. l. 843.

[8-2] Rule the rost.—HEYWOOD: Proverbes, part i. chap. v.

Her that ruled the rost.—THOMAS HEYWOOD: History of Women.

Rules the roast.—JONSON, CHAPMAN, MARSTON: Eastward Ho, act ii. sc. 1. SHAKESPEARE: 2 Henry VI. act i. sc. 1.

[8-3] In spite of my teeth.—MIDDLETON: A Trick to catch the Old One, act i. sc. 2. FIELDING: Eurydice Hissed.

[8-4] He knew what 's what.—BUTLER: Hudibras, part i. canto i. line 149.

[8-5] In hope her to attain by hook or crook.—SPENSER: Faerie Queene, book iii. canto i. st. 17.

[8-6] It is a foule byrd that fyleth his owne nest.—HEYWOOD: Proverbes, part ii. chap. v.



JOHN HEYWOOD.[8-7] Circa 1565.

The loss of wealth is loss of dirt, As sages in all times assert; The happy man 's without a shirt.

Be Merry Friends.

Let the world slide,[9-1] let the world go; A fig for care, and a fig for woe! If I can't pay, why I can owe, And death makes equal the high and low.

Be Merry Friends.

All a green willow, willow, All a green willow is my garland.

The Green Willow.

Haste maketh waste.

Proverbes. Part i. Chap. ii.

Beware of, Had I wist.[9-2]

Proverbes. Part i. Chap. ii.

Good to be merie and wise.[9-3]

Proverbes. Part i. Chap. ii.

Beaten with his owne rod.[9-4]

Proverbes. Part i. Chap. ii.

Look ere ye leape.[9-5]

Proverbes. Part i. Chap. ii.

He that will not when he may, When he would he shall have nay.[9-6]

Proverbes. Part i. Chap. iii.

The fat is in the fire.[9-7]

Proverbes. Part i. Chap. iii.

When the sunne shineth, make hay.

Proverbes. Part i. Chap. iii.

When the iron is hot, strike.[10-1]

Proverbes. Part i. Chap. iii.

The tide tarrieth no man.[10-2]

Proverbes. Part i. Chap. iii.

Than catch and hold while I may, fast binde, fast finde.[10-3]

Proverbes. Part i. Chap. iii.

And while I at length debate and beate the bush, There shall steppe in other men and catch the burdes.[10-4]

Proverbes. Part i. Chap. iii.

While betweene two stooles my taile goe to the ground.[10-5]

Proverbes. Part i. Chap. iii.

So many heads so many wits.[10-6]

Proverbes. Part i. Chap. iii.

Wedding is destiny, And hanging likewise.[10-7]

Proverbes. Part i. Chap. iii.

Happy man, happy dole.[11-1]

Proverbes. Part i. Chap. iii.

God never sends th' mouth but he sendeth meat.

Proverbes. Part i. Chap. iv.

Like will to like.

Proverbes. Part i. Chap. iv.

A hard beginning maketh a good ending.

Proverbes. Part i. Chap. iv.

When the skie falth we shall have Larkes.[11-2]

Proverbes. Part i. Chap. iv.

More frayd then hurt.

Proverbes. Part i. Chap. iv.

Feare may force a man to cast beyond the moone.[11-3]

Proverbes. Part i. Chap. iv.

Nothing is impossible to a willing hart.

Proverbes. Part i. Chap. iv.

The wise man sayth, store is no sore.

Proverbes. Part i. Chap. v.

Let the world wagge,[11-4] and take mine ease in myne Inne.[11-5]

Proverbes. Part i. Chap. v.

Rule the rost.[11-6]

Proverbes. Part i. Chap. v.

Hold their noses to grinstone.[11-7]

Proverbes. Part i. Chap. v.

Better to give then to take.[11-8]

Proverbes. Part i. Chap. v.

When all candles bee out, all cats be gray.

Proverbes. Part i. Chap. v.

No man ought to looke a given horse in the mouth.[11-9]

Proverbes. Part i. Chap. v.

I perfectly feele even at my fingers end.[12-1]

Proverbes. Part i. Chap. vi.

A sleveless errand.[12-2]

Proverbes. Part i. Chap. vii.

We both be at our wittes end.[12-3]

Proverbes. Part i. Chap. viii.

Reckeners without their host must recken twice.

Proverbes. Part i. Chap. viii.

A day after the faire.[12-4]

Proverbes. Part i. Chap. viii.

Cut my cote after my cloth.[12-5]

Proverbes. Part i. Chap. viii.

The neer to the church, the further from God.[12-6]

Proverbes. Part i. Chap. ix.

Now for good lucke, cast an old shooe after me.

Proverbes. Part i. Chap. ix.

Better is to bow then breake.[12-7]

Proverbes. Part i. Chap. ix.

It hurteth not the toung to give faire words.[12-8]

Proverbes. Part i. Chap. ix.

Two heads are better then one.

Proverbes. Part i. Chap. ix.

A short horse is soone currid.[12-9]

Proverbes. Part i. Chap. x.

To tell tales out of schoole.

Proverbes. Part i. Chap. x.

To hold with the hare and run with the hound.[12-10]

Proverbes. Part i. Chap. x.

She is nether fish nor flesh, nor good red herring.[13-1]

Proverbes. Part i. Chap. x.

All is well that endes well.[13-2]

Proverbes. Part i. Chap. x.

Of a good beginning cometh a good end.[13-3]

Proverbes. Part i. Chap. x.

Shee had seene far in a milstone.[13-4]

Proverbes. Part i. Chap. x.

Better late than never.[13-5]

Proverbes. Part i. Chap. x.

When the steede is stolne, shut the stable durre.[13-6]

Proverbes. Part i. Chap. x.

Pryde will have a fall; For pryde goeth before and shame commeth after.[13-7]

Proverbes. Part i. Chap. x.

She looketh as butter would not melt in her mouth.[13-8]

Proverbes. Part i. Chap. x.

The still sowe eats up all the draffe.[13-9]

Proverbes. Part i. Chap. x.

Ill weede growth fast.[13-10]

Proverbes. Part i. Chap. x.

It is a deere collop That is cut out of th' owne flesh.[14-1]

Proverbes. Part i. Chap. x.

Beggars should be no choosers.[14-2]

Proverbes. Part i. Chap. x.

Every cocke is proud on his owne dunghill.[14-3]

Proverbes. Part i. Chap. xi.

The rolling stone never gathereth mosse.[14-4]

Proverbes. Part i. Chap. xi.

To robbe Peter and pay Poule.[14-5]

Proverbes. Part i. Chap. xi.

A man may well bring a horse to the water, But he cannot make him drinke without he will.

Proverbes. Part i. Chap. xi.

Men say, kinde will creepe where it may not goe.[14-6]

Proverbes. Part i. Chap. xi.

The cat would eate fish, and would not wet her feete.[14-7]

Proverbes. Part i. Chap. xi.

While the grasse groweth the horse starveth.[14-8]

Proverbes. Part i. Chap. xi.

Better one byrde in hand than ten in the wood.[15-1]

Proverbes. Part i. Chap. xi.

Rome was not built in one day.

Proverbes. Part i. Chap. xi.

Yee have many strings to your bowe.[15-2]

Proverbes. Part i. Chap. xi.

Many small make a great.[15-3]

Proverbes. Part i. Chap. xi.

Children learne to creepe ere they can learne to goe.

Proverbes. Part i. Chap. xi.

Better is halfe a lofe than no bread.

Proverbes. Part i. Chap. xi.

Nought venter nought have.[15-4]

Proverbes. Part i. Chap. xi.

Children and fooles cannot lye.[15-5]

Proverbes. Part i. Chap. xi.

Set all at sixe and seven.[15-6]

Proverbes. Part i. Chap. xi.

All is fish that comth to net.[15-7]

Proverbes. Part i. Chap. xi.

Who is worse shod than the shoemaker's wife?[15-8]

Proverbes. Part i. Chap. xi.

One good turne asketh another.

Proverbes. Part i. Chap. xi.

By hooke or crooke.[15-9]

Proverbes. Part i. Chap. xi.

She frieth in her owne grease.[16-1]

Proverbes. Part i. Chap. xi.

Who waite for dead men shall goe long barefoote.

Proverbes. Part i. Chap. xi.

I pray thee let me and my fellow have A haire of the dog that bit us last night.[16-2]

Proverbes. Part i. Chap. xi.

But in deede, A friend is never knowne till a man have neede.

Proverbes. Part i. Chap. xi.

This wonder (as wonders last) lasted nine daies.[16-3]

Proverbes. Part ii. Chap. i.

New brome swepth cleene.[16-4]

Proverbes. Part ii. Chap. i.

All thing is the woorse for the wearing.

Proverbes. Part ii. Chap. i.

Burnt child fire dredth.[16-5]

Proverbes. Part ii. Chap. ii.

All is not Gospell that thou doest speake.[16-6]

Proverbes. Part ii. Chap. ii.

Love me litle, love me long.[16-7]

Proverbes. Part ii. Chap. ii.

A fooles bolt is soone shot.[16-8]

Proverbes. Part ii. Chap. iii.

A woman hath nine lives like a cat.[16-9]

Proverbes. Part ii. Chap. iv.

A peny for your thought.[16-10]

Proverbes. Part ii. Chap. iv.

You stand in your owne light.

Proverbes. Part ii. Chap. iv.

Though chaunge be no robbry.

Proverbes. Part ii. Chap. iv.

Might have gone further and have fared worse.

Proverbes. Part ii. Chap. iv.

The grey mare is the better horse.[17-1]

Proverbes. Part ii. Chap. iv.

Three may keepe counsayle, if two be away.[17-2]

Proverbes. Part ii. Chap. v.

Small pitchers have wyde eares.[17-3]

Proverbes. Part ii. Chap. v.

Many hands make light warke.

Proverbes. Part ii. Chap. v.

The greatest Clerkes be not the wisest men.[17-4]

Proverbes. Part ii. Chap. v.

Out of Gods blessing into the warme Sunne.[17-5]

Proverbes. Part ii. Chap. v.

There is no fire without some smoke.[17-6]

Proverbes. Part ii. Chap. v.

One swallow maketh not summer.[17-7]

Proverbes. Part ii. Chap. v.

Fieldes have eies and woods have eares.[17-8]

Proverbes. Part ii. Chap. v.

A cat may looke on a King.

Proverbes. Part ii. Chap. v.

It is a foule byrd that fyleth his owne nest.[18-1]

Proverbes. Part ii. Chap. v.

Have yee him on the hip.[18-2]

Proverbes. Part ii. Chap. v.

Hee must have a long spoone, shall eat with the devill.[18-3]

Proverbes. Part ii. Chap. v.

It had need to bee A wylie mouse that should breed in the cats eare.[18-4]

Proverbes. Part ii. Chap. v.

Leape out of the frying pan into the fyre.[18-5]

Proverbes. Part ii. Chap. v.

Time trieth troth in every doubt.[18-6]

Proverbes. Part ii. Chap. v.

Mad as a march hare.[18-7]

Proverbes. Part ii. Chap. v.

Much water goeth by the mill That the miller knoweth not of.[18-8]

Proverbes. Part ii. Chap. v.

He must needes goe whom the devill doth drive.[18-9]

Proverbes. Part ii. Chap. vii.

Set the cart before the horse.[18-10]

Proverbes. Part ii. Chap. vii.

The moe the merrier.[19-1]

Proverbes. Part ii. Chap. vii.

To th' end of a shot and beginning of a fray.[19-2]

Proverbes. Part ii. Chap. vii.

It is better to be An old man's derling than a yong man's werling.

Proverbes. Part ii. Chap. vii.

Be the day never so long, Evermore at last they ring to evensong.[19-3]

Proverbes. Part ii. Chap. vii.

The moone is made of a greene cheese.[19-4]

Proverbes. Part ii. Chap. vii.

I know on which side my bread is buttred.

Proverbes. Part ii. Chap. vii.

It will not out of the flesh that is bred in the bone.[19-5]

Proverbes. Part ii. Chap. viii.

Who is so deafe or so blinde as is hee That wilfully will neither heare nor see?[19-6]

Proverbes. Part ii. Chap. ix.

The wrong sow by th' eare.[19-7]

Proverbes. Part ii. Chap. ix.

Went in at the tone eare and out at the tother.[19-8]

Proverbes. Part ii. Chap. ix.

Love me, love my dog.[19-9]

Proverbes. Part ii. Chap. ix.

An ill winde that bloweth no man to good.[20-1]

Proverbes. Part i. Chap. ix.

For when I gave you an inch, you tooke an ell.[20-2]

Proverbes. Part ii. Chap. ix.

Would yee both eat your cake and have your cake?[20-3]

Proverbes. Part ii. Chap. ix.

Every man for himselfe and God for us all.[20-4]

Proverbes. Part ii. Chap. ix.

Though he love not to buy the pig in the poke.[20-5]

Proverbes. Part ii. Chap. ix.

This hitteth the naile on the hed.[20-6]

Proverbes. Part ii. Chap. xi.

Enough is as good as a feast.[20-7]

Proverbes. Part ii. Chap. xi.

FOOTNOTES:

[8-7] The Proverbes of John Heywood is the earliest collection of English colloquial sayings. It was first printed in 1546. The title of the edition of 1562 is, John Heywoodes Woorkes. A Dialogue conteyning the number of the effectuall proverbes in the English tounge, compact in a matter concernynge two maner of Maryages, etc. The selection here given is from the edition of 1874 (a reprint of 1598), edited by Julian Sharman.

[9-1] Let the world slide.—Towneley Mysteries, p. 101 (1420). SHAKESPEARE: Taming of the Shrew, induc. 1. BEAUMONT AND FLETCHER: Wit without Money, act v. sc. 2.

[9-2] A common exclamation of regret occurring in Spenser, Harrington, and the older writers. An earlier instance of the phrase occurs in the Towneley Mysteries.

[9-3] 'T is good to be merry and wise.—JONSON, CHAPMAN, MARSTON: Eastward Ho, act i. sc. 1. BURNS: Here 's a health to them that 's awa'.

[9-4] don fust C'on kint souvent est-on batu. (By his own stick the prudent one is often beaten.)

Roman du Renart, circa 1300.

[9-5] Look ere thou leap.—In Tottel's Miscellany, 1557; and in Tusser's Five Hundred Points of Good Husbandry. Of Wiving and Thriving. 1573.

Thou shouldst have looked before thou hadst leapt.—JONSON, CHAPMAN, MARSTON: Eastward Ho, act v. sc. 1.

Look before you ere you leap.—BUTLER: Hudibras, pt. ii. c. ii. l. 502.

[9-6] He that will not when he may, When he will he shall have nay.

BURTON: Anatomy of Melancholy, pt. iii. sec. 2, mem. 5, subs. 5.

He that wold not when he might, He shall not when he wolda.

The Baffled Knight. PERCY: Reliques.

[9-7] All the fatt 's in the fire.—MARSTON: What You Will. 1607.

[10-1] You should hammer your iron when it is glowing hot.—PUBLIUS SYRUS: Maxim 262.

Strike whilst the iron is hot.—RABELAIS: book ii. chap. xxxi. WEBSTER: Westward Hoe. Tom A'Lincolne. FARQUHAR: The Beaux' Stratagem, iv. 1.

[10-2] Hoist up saile while gale doth last, Tide and wind stay no man's pleasure.

ROBERT SOUTHWELL: St. Peter's Complaint. 1595.

Nae man can tether time or tide.—BURNS: Tam O' Shanter.

[10-3] Fast bind, fast find; A proverb never stale in thrifty mind.

SHAKESPEARE: Merchant of Venice, act ii. sc. 5.

Also in Jests of Scogin. 1565.

[10-4] It is this proverb which Henry V. is reported to have uttered at the siege of Orleans. "Shall I beat the bush and another take the bird?" said King Henry.

[10-5] Entre deux arcouns chet cul a terre (Between two stools one sits on the ground).—Les Proverbes del Vilain, MS. Bodleian. Circa 1303.

S'asseoir entre deux selles le cul a terre (One falls to the ground in trying to sit on two stools).—RABELAIS: book i. chap. ii.

[10-6] As many men, so many minds.—TERENCE: Phormio, ii. 3.

As the saying is, So many heades, so many wittes.—QUEEN ELIZABETH: Godly Meditacyon of the Christian Sowle. 1548.

So many men so many mindes.—GASCOIGNE: Glass of Government.

[10-7] Hanging and wiving go by destiny.—The Schole-hous for Women. 1541. SHAKESPEARE: Merchant of Venice, act 2. sc. 9.

Marriage and hanging go by destiny; matches are made in heaven.—BURTON: Anatomy of Melancholy, part iii. sec. 2, mem. 5, subs. 5.

[11-1] Happy man be his dole—SHAKESPEARE: Merry Wives, act iii. sc. 4; Winter's Tale, act i. sc. 2. BUTLER: Hudibras, part i. canto iii. line 168.

[11-2] Si les nues tomboyent esperoyt prendre les alouettes (If the skies fall, one may hope to catch larks).—RABELAIS: book i. chap. xi.

[11-3] To cast beyond the moon, is a phrase in frequent use by the old writers. LYLY: Euphues, p. 78. THOMAS HEYWOOD: A Woman Killed with Kindness.

[11-4] Let the world slide.—SHAKESPEARE: Taming of the Shrew, ind. 1; and, Let the world slip, ind. 2.

[11-5] Shall I not take mine ease in mine inn?—SHAKESPEARE: 1 Henry IV. act iii. sc. 2.

[11-6] See Skelton, page 8. SHAKESPEARE: 2 Henry VI. act i. sc. 1. THOMAS HEYWOOD: History of Women.

[11-7] Hold their noses to the grindstone.—MIDDLETON: Blurt, Master-Constable, act iii. sc. 3.

[11-8] It is more blessed to give than to receive.—John xx. 35.

[11-9] This proverb occurs in Rabelais, book i. chap. xi.; in Vulgaria Stambrigi, circa 1510; in Butler, part i. canto i. line 490. Archbishop Trench says this proverb is certainly as old as Jerome of the fourth century, who, when some found fault with certain writings of his, replied that they were free-will offerings, and that it did not behove to look a gift horse in the mouth.

[12-1] RABELAIS: book iv. chap. liv. At my fingers' ends.—SHAKESPEARE: Twelfth Night, act i. sc. 3.

[12-2] The origin of the word "sleveless," in the sense of unprofitable, has defied the most careful research. It is frequently found allied to other substantives. Bishop Hall speaks of the "sleveless tale of transubstantiation," and Milton writes of a "sleveless reason." Chaucer uses it in the Testament of Love.—SHARMAN.

[12-3] At their wit's end.—Psalm cvii. 27.

[12-4] THOMAS HEYWOOD: If you know not me, etc., 1605. TARLTON: Jests, 1611.

[12-5] A relic of the Sumptuary Laws. One of the earliest instances occurs, 1530, in the interlude of Godly Queene Hester.

[12-6] Qui est pres de l'eglise est souvent loin de Dieu (He who is near the Church is often far from God).—Les Proverbes Communs. Circa 1500.

[12-7] Rather to bowe than breke is profitable; Humylite is a thing commendable.

The Morale Proverbs of Cristyne; translated from the French (1390) by Earl Rivers, and printed by Caxton in 1478.

[12-8] Fair words never hurt the tongue.—JONSON, CHAPMAN, MARSTON: Eastward Ho, act iv. sc. 1.

[12-9] FLETCHER: Valentinian, act ii. sc. 1.

[12-10] HUMPHREY ROBERT: Complaint for Reformation, 1572. LYLY: Euphues, 1579 (Arber's reprint), p. 107.

[13-1] Neither fish nor flesh, nor good red herring.—SIR H. SHERES: Satyr on the Sea Officers. TOM BROWN: AEneus Sylvius's Letter. DRYDEN: Epilogue to the Duke of Guise.

[13-2] Si finis bonus est, totum bonum erit (If the end be well, all will be well).—Gestae Romanorum. Tale lxvii.

[13-3] Who that well his warke beginneth, The rather a good ende he winneth.

GOWER: Confessio Amantis.

[13-4] LYLY: Euphues (Arber's reprint), p. 288.

[13-5] TUSSER: Five Hundred Points of Good Husbandry, An Habitation Enforced. BUNYAN: Pilgrim's Progress. MATHEW HENRY: Commentaries, Matthew xxi. MURPHY: The School for Guardians.

Potius sero quam nunquam (Rather late than never).—LIVY: iv. ii. 11.

[13-6] Quant le cheval est emble dounke ferme fols l'estable (When the horse has been stolen, the fool shuts the stable).—Les Proverbes del Vilain.

[13-7] Pride goeth before destruction, and a haughty spirit before a fall.—Proverbs xvi. 18.

Pryde goeth before, and shame cometh behynde.—Treatise of a Gallant. Circa 1510.

[13-8] She looks as if butter would not melt in her mouth.—SWIFT: Polite Conversation.

[13-9] 'T is old, but true, still swine eat all the draff.—SHAKESPEARE: Merry Wives of Windsor, act iv. sc. 2.

[13-10] Ewyl weed ys sone y-growe.—MS. Harleian, circa 1490.

An ill weed grows apace.—CHAPMAN: An Humorous Day's Mirth.

Great weeds do grow apace.—SHAKESPEARE: Richard III. act ii. sc. 4. BEAUMONT AND FLETCHER: The Coxcomb, act iv. sc. 4.

[14-1] God knows thou art a collop of my flesh.—SHAKESPEARE: 1 Henry VI. act v. sc. 4.

[14-2] Beggars must be no choosers.—BEAUMONT AND FLETCHER: The Scornful Lady, act v. sc. 3.

[14-3] et coc is kene on his owne mixenne.—e Ancren Riwle. Circa 1250.

[14-4] The stone that is rolling can gather no moss.—TUSSER: Five Hundred Points of Good Husbandry.

A rolling stone gathers no moss.—PUBLIUS SYRUS: Maxim 524. GOSSON: Ephemerides of Phialo. MARSTON: The Fawn.

Pierre volage ne queult mousse (A rolling stone gathers no moss).—De l'hermite qui se desespera pour le larron que ala en paradis avant que lui, 13th century.

[14-5] To rob Peter and pay Paul is said to have derived its origin when, in the reign of Edward VI., the lands of St. Peter at Westminster were appropriated to raise money for the repair of St. Paul's in London.

[14-6] You know that love Will creep in service when it cannot go.

SHAKESPEARE: Two Gentlemen of Verona, act iv. sc. 2.

[14-7] Shakespeare alludes to this proverb in Macbeth:—

Letting I dare not wait upon I would, Like the poor cat i' the adage.

Cat lufat visch, ac he nele his feth wete.—MS. Trinity College, Cambridge, circa 1250.

[14-8] Whylst grass doth grow, oft sterves the seely steede.—WHETSTONE: Promos and Cassandra. 1578.

While the grass grows— The proverb is something musty.

SHAKESPEARE: Hamlet, act iii. sc. 4.

[15-1] An earlier instance occurs in Heywood, in his "Dialogue on Wit and Folly," circa 1530.

[15-2] Two strings to his bow.—HOOKER: Polity, book v. chap. lxxx. CHAPMAN: D'Ambois, act ii. sc. 3. BUTLER: Hudibras, part iii. canto i. line 1. CHURCHILL: The Ghost, book iv. FIELDING: Love in Several Masques, sc. 13.

[15-3] See Chaucer, page 5.

[15-4] Naught venture naught have.—TUSSER: Five Hundred Points of Good Husbandry. October Abstract.

[15-5] 'T is an old saw, Children and fooles speake true.—LYLY: Endymion.

[15-6] Set all on sex and seven.—CHAUCER: Troilus and Cresseide, book iv. line 623; also Towneley Mysteries.

At six and seven.—SHAKESPEARE: Richard II. act ii. sc. 2.

[15-7] All 's fish they get that cometh to net.—TUSSER: Five Hundred Points of Good Husbandry. February Abstract.

Where all is fish that cometh to net.—GASCOIGNE: Steele Glas. 1575.

[15-8] Him that makes shoes go barefoot himself.—BURTON: Anatomy of Melancholy. Democritus to the Reader.

[15-9] This phrase derives its origin from the custom of certain manors where tenants are authorized to take fire-bote by hook or by crook; that is, so much of the underwood as many be cut with a crook, and so much of the loose timber as may be collected from the boughs by means of a hook. One of the earliest citations of this proverb occurs in John Wycliffe's Controversial Tracts, circa 1370.—See Skelton, page 8. RABELAIS: book v. chap. xiii. DU BARTAS: The Map of Man. SPENSER: Faerie Queene, book iii. canto i. st. 17. BEAUMONT AND FLETCHER: Women Pleased, act. i. sc. 3.

[16-1] See Chaucer, page 3.

[16-2] In old receipt books we find it invariably advised that an inebriate should drink sparingly in the morning some of the same liquor which he had drunk to excess over-night.

[16-3] See Chaucer, page 6.

[16-4] Ah, well I wot that a new broome sweepeth cleane—LYLY: Euphues (Arber's reprint), p. 89.

[16-5] Brend child fur dredth, Quoth Hendyng.

Proverbs of Hendyng. MSS.

A burnt child dreadeth the fire.—LYLY: Euphues (Arber's reprint), p. 319.

[16-6] You do not speak gospel.—RABELAIS: book i. chap. xiii.

[16-7] MARLOWE: Jew of Malta, act iv. sc. 6. BACON: Formularies.

[16-8] Sottes bolt is sone shote.—Proverbs of Hendyng. MSS.

[16-9] It has been the Providence of Nature to give this creature nine lives instead of one.—PILPAY: The Greedy and Ambitious Cat, fable iii. B. C.

[16-10] LYLY: Euphues (Arber's reprint), p. 80.

[17-1] Pryde and Abuse of Women. 1550. The Marriage of True Wit and Science. BUTLER: Hudibras, part ii. canto i. line 698. FIELDING: The Grub Street Opera, act ii. sc. 4. PRIOR: Epilogue to Lucius.

Lord Macaulay (History of England, vol. i. chap. iii.) thinks that this proverb originated in the preference generally given to the gray mares of Flanders over the finest coach-horses of England. Macaulay, however, is writing of the latter half of the seventeenth century, while the proverb was used a century earlier.

[17-2] See Chaucer, page 6.

Two may keep counsel when the third 's away.—SHAKESPEARE: Titus Andronicus, act iv. sc. 2.

[17-3] Pitchers have ears.—SHAKESPEARE: Richard III. act ii. sc. 4.

[17-4] See Chaucer, page 3.

[17-5] Thou shalt come out of a warme sunne into Gods blessing.—LYLY: Euphues.

Thou out of Heaven's benediction comest To the warm sun.

SHAKESPEARE: Lear, act ii. sc. 2.

[17-6] Ther can no great smoke arise, but there must be some fire.—LYLY: Euphues (Arber's reprint), p. 153.

[17-7] One swallowe prouveth not that summer is neare.—NORTHBROOKE: Treatise against Dancing. 1577.

[17-8] See Chaucer, page 2.

[18-1] See Skelton, page 8.

[18-2] I have thee on the hip.—SHAKESPEARE: Merchant of Venice, act iv. sc. 1; Othello, act ii. sc. 7.

[18-3] See Chaucer, page 4.

[18-4] A hardy mouse that is bold to breede In cattis eeris.

Order of Foles. MS. circa 1450.

[18-5] The same in Don Quixote (Lockhart's ed.), part i. book iii. chap. iv. BUNYAN: Pilgrim's Progress. FLETCHER: The Wild-Goose Chase, act iv. sc. 3.

[18-6] Time trieth truth.—Tottel's Miscellany, reprint 1867, p. 221.

Time tries the troth in everything.—TUSSER: Five Hundred Points of Good Husbandry. Author's Epistle, chap. i.

[18-7] I saye, thou madde March hare.—SKELTON: Replycation against certayne yong scolers.

[18-8] More water glideth by the mill Than wots the miller of.

SHAKESPEARE: Titus Andronicus, act ii. sc. 7.

[18-9] An earlier instance of this proverb occurs in Heywood's Johan the Husbande. 1533.

He must needs go whom the devil drives.—SHAKESPEARE: All's Well that Ends Well, act i. sc. 3. CERVANTES: Don Quixote, part i. book iv. chap. iv. GOSSON: Ephemerides of Phialo. PEELE: Edward I.

[18-10] Others set carts before the horses.—RABELAIS: book v. chap. xxii.

[19-1] GASCOIGNE: Roses, 1575. Title of a Book of Epigrams, 1608. BEAUMONT AND FLETCHER: The Scornful Lady, act i. sc. 1; The Sea Voyage, act i. sc. 2.

[19-2] To the latter end of a fray and the beginning of a feast.—SHAKESPEARE: 2 Henry IV. act iv. sc. 2.

[19-3] Be the day short or never so long, At length it ringeth to even song.

Quoted at the Stake by George Tankerfield (1555).

FOX: Book of Martyrs, chap. vii. p. 346.

[19-4] Jack Jugler, p. 46. RABELAIS: book i. chap. xi. BLACKLOCH: Hatchet of Heresies, 1565. BUTLER: Hudibras, part ii. canto iii. line 263.

[19-5] What is bred in the bone will never come out of the flesh.—PILPAY: The Two Fishermen, fable xiv.

It will never out of the flesh that 's bred in the bone.—JONSON: Every Man in his Humour, act i. sc. 1.

[19-6] None so deaf as those that will not hear.—MATHEW HENRY: Commentaries. Psalm lviii.

[19-7] He has the wrong sow by the ear.—JONSON: Every Man in his Humour, act ii. sc. 1.

[19-8] See Chaucer, page 6.

[19-9] CHAPMAN: Widow's Tears, 1612.

A proverb in the time of Saint Bernard was, Qui me amat, amet et canem meum (Who loves me will love my dog also).—Sermo Primus.



THOMAS TUSSER. Circa 1515-1580.

God sendeth and giveth both mouth and the meat.[20-8]

Five Hundred Points of Good Husbandry.

Except wind stands as never it stood, It is an ill wind turns none to good.

Five Hundred Points of Good Husbandry. A Description of the Properties of Wind.

At Christmas play and make good cheer, For Christmas comes but once a year.

Five Hundred Points of Good Husbandry. The Farmer's Daily Diet.

Such, mistress, such Nan, Such master, such man.[21-1]

Five Hundred Points of Good Husbandry. April's Abstract.

Who goeth a borrowing Goeth a sorrowing.

Five Hundred Points of Good Husbandry. June's Abstract.

'T is merry in hall Where beards wag all.[21-2]

Five Hundred Points of Good Husbandry. August's Abstract.

Naught venture naught have.[21-3]

Five Hundred Points of Good Husbandry. October's Abstract.

Dry sun, dry wind; Safe bind, safe find.[21-4]

Five Hundred Points of Good Husbandry. Washing.

FOOTNOTES:

[20-1] Falstaff. What wind blew you hither, Pistol?

Pistol. Not the ill wind which blows no man to good.

SHAKESPEARE: 2 Henry IV. act v. sc. 3.

[20-2] Give an inch, he 'll take an ell.—WEBSTER: Sir Thomas Wyatt.

[20-3] Wouldst thou both eat thy cake and have it?—HERBERT: The Size.

[20-4] Every man for himself, his own ends, the devil for all.—BURTON: Anatomy of Melancholy, part iii. sec. i. mem. iii.

[20-5] For buying or selling of pig in a poke.—TUSSER: Five Hundred Points of Good Husbandry. September Abstract.

[20-6] You have there hit the nail on the head.—RABELAIS: bk. iii. ch. xxxi.

[20-7] Dives and Pauper, 1493. GASCOIGNE: Poesies, 1575. POPE: Horace, book i. Ep. vii. line 24. FIELDING: Covent Garden Tragedy, act v. sc. 1. BICKERSTAFF: Love in a Village, act iii. sc. 1.

[20-8] God sends meat, and the Devil sends cooks.—JOHN TAYLOR: Works, vol. ii. p. 85 (1630). RAY: Proverbs. GARRICK: Epigram on Goldsmith's Retaliation.

[21-1] On the authority of M. Cimber, of the Bibliotheque Royale, we owe this proverb to Chevalier Bayard: "Tel maitre, tel valet."

[21-2] Merry swithe it is in halle, When the beards waveth alle.

Life of Alexander, 1312.

This has been wrongly attributed to Adam Davie. There the line runs,—

Swithe mury hit is in halle, When burdes waiven alle.

[21-3] See Heywood, page 15.

[21-4] See Heywood, page 10. SHAKESPEARE: Merchant of Venice, act ii. sc. 5.



RICHARD EDWARDS. Circa 1523-1566.

The fallyng out of faithfull frends is the renuyng of loue.[21-5]

The Paradise of Dainty Devices.

FOOTNOTES:

[21-5] The anger of lovers renews the strength of love.—PUBLIUS SYRUS: Maxim 24.

Let the falling out of friends be a renewing of affection.—LYLY: Euphues.

The falling out of lovers is the renewing of love.—BURTON: Anatomy of Melancholy, part iii. sec. 2.

Amantium irae amoris integratiost (The quarrels of lovers are the renewal of love).—TERENCE: Andria, act iii. sc. 5.



EDWARD DYER. Circa 1540-1607.

My mind to me a kingdom is; Such present joys therein I find, That it excels all other bliss That earth affords or grows by kind: Though much I want which most would have, Yet still my mind forbids to crave.

MS. Rawl. 85, p. 17.[22-1]

Some have too much, yet still do crave; I little have, and seek no more: They are but poor, though much they have, And I am rich with little store: They poor, I rich; they beg, I give; They lack, I have; they pine, I live.

MS. Rawl. 85, p. 17.

FOOTNOTES:

[22-1] There is a very similar but anonymous copy in the British Museum. Additional MS. 15225, p. 85. And there is an imitation in J. Sylvester's Works, p. 651.—HANNAH: Courtly Poets.

My mind to me a kingdom is; Such perfect joy therein I find, As far exceeds all earthly bliss That God and Nature hath assigned. Though much I want that most would have, Yet still my mind forbids to crave.

BYRD: Psalmes, Sonnets, etc. 1588.

My mind to me an empire is, While grace affordeth health.

ROBERT SOUTHWELL (1560-1595): Loo Home.

Mens regnum bona possidet (A good mind possesses a kingdom).—SENECA: Thyestes, ii. 380.



BISHOP STILL (JOHN). 1543-1607.

I cannot eat but little meat, My stomach is not good; But sure I think that I can drink With him that wears a hood.

Gammer Gurton's Needle.[22-2] Act ii.

Back and side go bare, go bare, Both foot and hand go cold; But, belly, God send thee good ale enough, Whether it be new or old.

Gammer Gurton's Needle. Act ii.

FOOTNOTES:

[22-2] Stated by Dyce to be from a MS. of older date than Gammer Gurton's Needle. See Skelton's Works (Dyce's ed.), vol. i. pp. vii-x, note.



THOMAS STERNHOLD. Circa 1549.

The Lord descended from above And bow'd the heavens high; And underneath his feet he cast The darkness of the sky.

On cherubs and on cherubims Full royally he rode; And on the wings of all the winds Came flying all abroad.

A Metrical Version of Psalm civ.



MATHEW ROYDON. Circa 1586.

A sweet attractive kinde of grace, A full assurance given by lookes, Continuall comfort in a face The lineaments of Gospell bookes.

An Elegie; or Friend's Passion for his Astrophill.[23-1]

Was never eie did see that face, Was never eare did heare that tong, Was never minde did minde his grace, That ever thought the travell long; But eies and eares and ev'ry thought Were with his sweete perfections caught.

An Elegie; or Friend's Passion for his Astrophill.

FOOTNOTES:

[23-1] This piece (ascribed to Spenser) was printed in The Phoenix' Nest, 4to, 1593, where it is anonymous. Todd has shown that it was written by Mathew Roydon.



SIR EDWARD COKE. 1549-1634.

The gladsome light of jurisprudence.

First Institute.

Reason is the life of the law; nay, the common law itself is nothing else but reason. . . . The law, which is perfection of reason.[24-1]

First Institute.

For a man's house is his castle, et domus sua cuique tutissimum refugium.[24-2]

Third Institute. Page 162.

The house of every one is to him as his castle and fortress, as well for his defence against injury and violence as for his repose.

Semayne's Case, 5 Rep. 91.

They (corporations) cannot commit treason, nor be outlawed nor excommunicate, for they have no souls.

Case of Sutton's Hospital, 10 Rep. 32.

Magna Charta is such a fellow that he will have no sovereign.

Debate in the Commons, May 17, 1628.

Six hours in sleep, in law's grave study six, Four spend in prayer, the rest on Nature fix.[24-3]

Translation of lines quoted by Coke.

FOOTNOTES:

[24-1] Let us consider the reason of the case. For nothing is law that is not reason.—SIR JOHN POWELL: Coggs vs. Bernard, 2 Ld. Raym. Rep. p. 911.

[24-2] Pandects, lib. ii. tit. iv. De in Jus vocando.

[24-3] Seven hours to law, to soothing slumber seven; Ten to the world allot, and all to heaven.

Sir WILLIAM JONES.



GEORGE PEELE. 1552-1598.

His golden locks time hath to silver turned; O time too swift! Oh swiftness never ceasing! His youth 'gainst time and age hath ever spurned, But spurned in vain; youth waneth by encreasing.

Sonnet. Polyhymnia.

His helmet now shall make a hive for bees, And lovers' songs be turned to holy psalms; A man-at-arms must now serve on his knees, And feed on prayers, which are old age's alms.

Sonnet. Polyhymnia.

My merry, merry, merry roundelay Concludes with Cupid's curse: They that do change old love for new, Pray gods, they change for worse!

Cupid's Curse.



SIR WALTER RALEIGH. 1552-1618.

If all the world and love were young, And truth in every shepherd's tongue, These pretty pleasures might me move To live with thee, and be thy love.

The Nymph's Reply to the Passionate Shepherd.

Fain would I, but I dare not; I dare, and yet I may not; I may, although I care not, for pleasure when I play not.

Fain Would I.

Passions are likened best to floods and streams: The shallow murmur, but the deep are dumb.[25-1]

The Silent Lover.

Silence in love bewrays more woe Than words, though ne'er so witty: A beggar that is dumb, you know, May challenge double pity.

The Silent Lover.

Go, Soul, the body's guest, Upon a thankless arrant: Fear not to touch the best, The truth shall be thy warrant: Go, since I needs must die, And give the world the lie.

The Lie.

Methought I saw the grave where Laura lay.[26-1]

Verses to Edmund Spenser.

Cowards [may] fear to die; but courage stout, Rather than live in snuff, will be put out.

On the snuff of a candle the night before he died.—Raleigh's Remains, p. 258, ed. 1661.

Even such is time, that takes in trust Our youth, our joys, our all we have, And pays us but with age and dust; Who in the dark and silent grave, When we have wandered all our ways, Shuts up the story of our days. But from this earth, this grave, this dust, My God shall raise me up, I trust!

Written the night before his death.—Found in his Bible in the Gate-house at Westminster.

Shall I, like an hermit, dwell On a rock or in a cell?

Poem.

If she undervalue me, What care I how fair she be?[26-2]

Poem.

If she seem not chaste to me, What care I how chaste she be?

Poem.

Fain would I climb, yet fear I to fall.[26-3]

[History] hath triumphed over time, which besides it nothing but eternity hath triumphed over.

Historie of the World. Preface.

O eloquent, just, and mightie Death! whom none could advise, thou hast perswaded; what none hath dared, thou hast done; and whom all the world hath flattered, thou only hast cast out of the world and despised. Thou hast drawne together all the farre stretched greatnesse, all the pride, crueltie, and ambition of man, and covered it all over with these two narrow words, Hic jacet!

Historie of the World. Book v. Part 1.

FOOTNOTES:

[25-1] Altissima quaeque flumina minimo sono labi (The deepest rivers flow with the least sound).—Q. CURTIUS, vii. 4. 13.

Smooth runs the water where the brook is deep.—SHAKESPEARE: 2 Henry VI. act iii. sc. i.

[26-1] Methought I saw my late espoused saint.—MILTON: Sonnet xxiii.

Methought I saw the footsteps of a throne.—WORDSWORTH: Sonnet.

[26-2] If she be not so to me, What care I how fair she be?

GEORGE WITHER: The Shepherd's Resolution.

[26-3] Written in a glass window obvious to the Queen's eye. "Her Majesty, either espying or being shown it, did under-write, 'If thy heart fails thee, climb not at all.'"—FULLER: Worthies of England, vol. i. p. 419.



EDMUND SPENSER. 1553-1599.

Fierce warres and faithful loves shall moralize my song.[27-1]

Faerie Queene. Introduction. St. 1.

A gentle knight was pricking on the plaine.

Faerie Queene. Book i. Canto i. St. 1.

O happy earth, Whereon thy innocent feet doe ever tread!

Faerie Queene. Book i. Canto i. St. 9.

The noblest mind the best contentment has.

Faerie Queene. Book i. Canto i. St. 35.

A bold bad man.[27-2]

Faerie Queene. Book i. Canto i. St. 37.

Her angels face, As the great eye of heaven, shyned bright, And made a sunshine in the shady place.

Faerie Queene. Book i. Canto iii. St. 4.

Ay me, how many perils doe enfold The righteous man, to make him daily fall![27-3]

Faerie Queene. Book i. Canto viii. St. 1.

As when in Cymbrian plaine An heard of bulles, whom kindly rage doth sting, Doe for the milky mothers want complaine,[27-4] And fill the fieldes with troublous bellowing.

Faerie Queene. Book i. Canto viii. St. 11.

Entire affection hateth nicer hands.

Faerie Queene. Book i. Canto viii. St. 40.

That darksome cave they enter, where they find That cursed man, low sitting on the ground, Musing full sadly in his sullein mind.

Faerie Queene. Book i. Canto ix. St. 35.

No daintie flowre or herbe that growes on grownd, No arborett with painted blossoms drest And smelling sweete, but there it might be fownd To bud out faire, and throwe her sweete smels al arownd.

Faerie Queene. Book ii. Canto vi. St. 12.

And is there care in Heaven? And is there love In heavenly spirits to these Creatures bace?

Faerie Queene. Book ii. Canto viii. St. 1.

How oft do they their silver bowers leave To come to succour us that succour want!

Faerie Queene. Book ii. Canto viii. St. 2.

Eftsoones they heard a most melodious sound.

Faerie Queene. Book ii. Canto xii. St. 70.

Through thick and thin, both over bank and bush,[28-1] In hope her to attain by hook or crook.[28-2]

Faerie Queene. Book iii. Canto i. St. 17.

Her berth was of the wombe of morning dew,[28-3] And her conception of the joyous Prime.

Faerie Queene. Book iii. Canto vi. St. 3.

Roses red and violets blew, And all the sweetest flowres that in the forrest grew.

Faerie Queene. Book iii. Canto vi. St. 6.

Be bolde, Be bolde, and everywhere, Be bold.[28-4]

Faerie Queene. Book iii. Canto xi. St. 54.

Dan Chaucer, well of English undefyled, On Fame's eternall beadroll worthie to be fyled.

Faerie Queene. Book iv. Canto ii. St. 32.

For all that Nature by her mother-wit[29-1] Could frame in earth.

Faerie Queene. Book iv. Canto x. St. 21.

Ill can he rule the great that cannot reach the small.

Faerie Queene. Book v. Canto ii. St. 43.

Who will not mercie unto others show, How can he mercy ever hope to have?[29-2]

Faerie Queene. Book v. Canto ii. St. 42.

The gentle minde by gentle deeds is knowne; For a man by nothing is so well bewrayed As by his manners.

Faerie Queene. Book vi. Canto iii. St. 1.

For we by conquest, of our soveraine might, And by eternall doome of Fate's decree, Have wonne the Empire of the Heavens bright.

Faerie Queene. Book vii. Canto xi. St. 33.

For of the soule the bodie forme doth take; For soule is forme, and doth the bodie make.

An Hymne in Honour of Beautie. Line 132.

For all that faire is, is by nature good;[29-3] That is a signe to know the gentle blood.

An Hymne in Honour of Beautie. Line 139.

To kerke the narre from God more farre,[29-4] Has bene an old-sayd sawe; And he that strives to touche a starre Oft stombles at a strawe.

The Shepheardes Calender. July. Line 97.

Full little knowest thou that hast not tride, What hell it is in suing long to bide: To loose good dayes, that might be better spent; To wast long nights in pensive discontent; To speed to-day, to be put back to-morrow; To feed on hope, to pine with feare and sorrow. . . . . . . . . . To fret thy soule with crosses and with cares; To eate thy heart through comfortlesse dispaires;[30-1] To fawne, to crowche, to waite, to ride, to ronne, To spend, to give, to want, to be undonne. Unhappie wight, borne to desastrous end, That doth his life in so long tendance spend!

Mother Hubberds Tale. Line 895.

What more felicitie can fall to creature Than to enjoy delight with libertie, And to be lord of all the workes of Nature, To raine in th' aire from earth to highest skie, To feed on flowres and weeds of glorious feature.

Muiopotmos: or, The Fate of the Butterflie. Line 209.

I hate the day, because it lendeth light To see all things, but not my love to see.

Daphnaida, v. 407.

Tell her the joyous Time will not be staid, Unlesse she doe him by the forelock take.[30-2]

Amoretti, lxx.

I was promised on a time To have reason for my rhyme; From that time unto this season, I received nor rhyme nor reason.[30-3]

Lines on his Promised Pension.[30-4]

Behold, whiles she before the altar stands, Hearing the holy priest that to her speakes, And blesseth her with his two happy hands.

Epithalamion. Line 223.

FOOTNOTES:

[27-1] And moralized his song.—POPE: Epistle to Arbuthnot. Line 340.

[27-2] This bold bad man.—SHAKESPEARE: Henry VIII. act ii. sc. 2. MASSINGER: A New Way to Pay Old Debts, act iv. sc. 2.

[27-3] Ay me! what perils do environ The man that meddles with cold iron!

BUTLER: Hudibras, part i. canto iii. line 1.

[27-4] "Milky Mothers,"—POPE: The Dunciad, book ii. line 247. SCOTT: The Monastery, chap. xxviii.

[28-1] Through thick and thin.—DRAYTON: Nymphidiae. MIDDLETON: The Roaring Girl, act iv. sc. 2. KEMP: Nine Days' Wonder. BUTLER: Hudibras, part i. canto ii. line 370. DRYDEN: Absalom and Achitophel, part ii. line 414. POPE: Dunciad, book ii. COWPER: John Gilpin.

[28-2] See Skelton, page 8.

[28-3] The dew of thy birth is of the womb of the morning.—Psalm cx. 3, Book of Common Prayer.

[28-4] De l'audace, encore de l'audace, et toujours de l'audace (Boldness, again boldness, and ever boldness).—DANTON: Speech in the Legislative Assembly, 1792.

[29-1] Mother wit.—MARLOWE: Prologue to Tamberlaine the Great, part i. MIDDLETON: Your Five Gallants, act i. sc. 1. SHAKESPEARE: Taming of the Shrew, act ii. sc. 1.

[29-2] Blessed are the merciful, for they shall obtain mercy.—Matthew v. 7.

[29-3] The hand that hath made you fair hath made you good.—SHAKESPEARE: Measure for Measure, act iii. sc. 1.

[29-4] See Heywood, page 12.

[30-1] Eat not thy heart; which forbids to afflict our souls, and waste them with vexatious cares.—PLUTARCH: Of the Training of Children.

But suffered idleness To eat his heart away.

BRYANT: Homer's Iliad, book i. line 319.

[30-2] Take Time by the forelock.—THALES (of Miletus). 636-546 B. C.

[30-3] Rhyme nor reason.—Pierre Patelin, quoted by Tyndale in 1530. Farce du Vendeur des Lieures, sixteenth century. PEELE: Edward I. SHAKESPEARE: As You Like It, act iii. sc. 2; Merry Wives of Windsor, act v. sc. 5; Comedy of Errors, act ii. sc. 2.

Sir Thomas More advised an author, who had sent him his manuscript to read, "to put it in rhyme." Which being done, Sir Thomas said, "Yea, marry, now it is somewhat, for now it is rhyme; before it was neither rhyme nor reason."

[30-4] FULLER: Worthies of England, vol. ii. p. 379.



RICHARD HOOKER. 1553-1600.

Of Law there can be no less acknowledged than that her seat is the bosom of God, her voice the harmony of the world. All things in heaven and earth do her homage,—the very least as feeling her care, and the greatest as not exempted from her power.

Ecclesiastical Polity. Book i.

That to live by one man's will became the cause of all men's misery.

Ecclesiastical Polity. Book i.



JOHN LYLY. Circa 1553-1601.

Cupid and my Campaspe play'd At cards for kisses: Cupid paid. He stakes his quiver, bow, and arrows, His mother's doves, and team of sparrows: Loses them too. Then down he throws The coral of his lip, the rose Growing on 's cheek (but none knows how); With these, the crystal of his brow, And then the dimple on his chin: All these did my Campaspe win. At last he set her both his eyes: She won, and Cupid blind did rise. O Love! has she done this to thee? What shall, alas! become of me?

Cupid and Campaspe. Act iii. Sc. 5.

How at heaven's gates she claps her wings, The morne not waking til she sings.[32-1]

Cupid and Campaspe. Act v. Sc. 1.

Be valyaunt, but not too venturous. Let thy attyre bee comely, but not costly.[32-2]

Euphues, 1579 (Arber's reprint), page 39.

Though the Camomill, the more it is trodden and pressed downe the more it spreadeth.[32-3]

Euphues, 1579 (Arber's reprint), page 46.

The finest edge is made with the blunt whetstone.

Euphues, 1579 (Arber's reprint), page 47.

I cast before the Moone.[32-4]

Euphues, 1579 (Arber's reprint), page 78.

It seems to me (said she) that you are in some brown study.[32-5]

Euphues, 1579 (Arber's reprint), page 80.

The soft droppes of rain perce the hard marble;[32-6] many strokes overthrow the tallest oaks.[32-7]

Euphues, 1579 (Arber's reprint), page 81.

He reckoneth without his Hostesse.[32-8] Love knoweth no lawes.

Euphues, 1579 (Arber's reprint), page 84.

Did not Jupiter transforme himselfe into the shape of Amphitrio to embrace Alcmaena; into the form of a swan to enjoy Leda; into a Bull to beguile Io; into a showre of gold to win Danae?[32-9]

Euphues, 1579 (Arber's reprint), page 93.

Lette me stande to the maine chance.[33-1]

Euphues, 1579 (Arber's reprint), page 104.

I mean not to run with the Hare and holde with the Hounde.[33-2]

Euphues, 1579 (Arber's reprint), page 107.

It is a world to see.[33-3]

Euphues, 1579 (Arber's reprint), page 116.

There can no great smoke arise, but there must be some fire.[33-4]

Euphues and his Euphoebus, page 153.

A clere conscience is a sure carde.[33-5]

Euphues, page 207.

As lyke as one pease is to another.

Euphues, page 215.

Goe to bed with the Lambe, and rise with the Larke.[33-6]

Euphues and his England, page 229.

A comely olde man as busie as a bee.

Euphues and his England, page 252.

Maydens, be they never so foolyshe, yet beeing fayre they are commonly fortunate.

Euphues and his England, page 279.

Where the streame runneth smoothest, the water is deepest.[33-7]

Euphues and his England, page 287.

Your eyes are so sharpe that you cannot onely looke through a Milstone, but cleane through the minde.

Euphues and his England, page 289.

I am glad that my Adonis hath a sweete tooth in his head.

Euphues and his England, page 308.

A Rose is sweeter in the budde than full blowne.[33-8]

Euphues and his England, page 314.

FOOTNOTES:

[32-1] Hark, hark! the lark at heaven's gate sings, And Phoebus 'gins arise.

SHAKESPEARE: Cymbeline, act ii. sc. 3.

[32-2] Costly thy habit as thy purse can buy, But not express'd in fancy; rich, not gaudy.

SHAKESPEARE: Hamlet, act i. sc. 3.

[32-3] The camomile, the more it is trodden on the faster it grows.—SHAKESPEARE: 1 Henry IV. act ii. sc. 4.

[32-4] See Heywood, page 11.

[32-5] A brown study.—SWIFT: Polite Conversation.

[32-6] Water continually dropping will wear hard rocks hollow.—PLUTARCH: Of the Training of Children.

Stillicidi casus lapidem cavat (Continual dropping wears away a stone). LUCRETIUS: i. 314.

[32-7] Many strokes, though with a little axe, Hew down and fell the hardest-timber'd oak.

SHAKESPEARE: 3 Henry VI. act ii. sc. 1.

[32-8] See Heywood, page 12.

[32-9] Jupiter himself was turned into a satyr, a shepherd, a bull, a swan, a golden shower, and what not for love.—BURTON: Anatomy of Melancholy, part iii. sec. ii. mem. i. subs. 1.

[33-1] The main chance.—SHAKESPEARE: 1 Henry VI. act i. sc. 1. BUTLER: Hudibras, part ii. canto ii. DRYDEN: Persius, satire vi.

[33-2] See Heywood, page 12.

[33-3] 'T is a world to see.—SHAKESPEARE: Taming of the Shrew, act ii. sc. 1.

[33-4] See Heywood, page 17.

[33-5] This is a sure card.—Thersytes, circa 1550.

[33-6] To rise with the lark and go to bed with the lamb.—BRETON: Court and Country, 1618 (reprint, page 182).

Rise with the lark, and with the lark to bed.—HURDIS: The Village Curate.

[33-7] See Raleigh, page 25.

[33-8] The rose is fairest when 't is budding new.—SCOTT: Lady of the Lake, canto iii. st. 1.



SIR PHILIP SIDNEY. 1554-1586.

Sweet food of sweetly uttered knowledge.

Defence of Poesy.

He cometh unto you with a tale which holdeth children from play, and old men from the chimney-corner.

Defence of Poesy.

I never heard the old song of Percy and Douglas that I found not my heart moved more than with a trumpet.

Defence of Poesy.

High-erected thoughts seated in the heart of courtesy.[34-1]

Arcadia. Book i.

They are never alone that are accompanied with noble thoughts.[34-2]

Arcadia. Book i.

Many-headed multitude.[34-3]

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