HotFreeBooks.com
Handbook of Wool Knitting and Crochet
Author: Anonymous
1  2     Next Part
Home - Random Browse

Handbook of Wool Knitting and Crochet



Published by Needlecraft Publishing Company Augusta, Maine 1918

* * * * *



You can crochet the most fascinating things imaginable if you have this

Handbook of Crochet

By Emma Chalmers Monroe

This book is equally appreciated by beginner or expert. It contains most valuable information and instructions for everyone who crochets or wishes to learn to do this beautiful work. It embodies a very careful selection of designs; and, from the simplest to the most ornate, every successive step is explained and illustrated so fully that perfect results are a certainty.

It describes the making of the newest designs for the ever popular use of crochet and gives instructions and patterns for Edgings, Borders, Scarf-Ends, Insertions, Yokes, Lunch-Sets, Doilies, etc.

The book has twenty-eight pages (size 7x10 inches) and 44 illustrations. It is printed on a fine quality of paper with the cover in colors.

Your copy of Emma Chalmers Monroe's Handbook of Crochet will be sent you, prepaid, upon receipt of 12 cents, stamps or coin. It can be obtained only from us.

Needlecraft Augusta—Maine



Handbook of Wool Knitting and Crochet



A Lesson in Knitting



The first thing to be done in knitting is to cast on or, as it is sometimes called, to "set up the foundation." (Figure 1). There are several methods for this, the following being that preferred and generally used by the writer: Leave a spare end of thread, sufficient for the number of stitches you wish to cast on, lying toward the left, the spool or ball from which the working-thread is drawn being at the right. Lay the thread between the little finger and the third of the left hand; bring the working-thread across the palm of the hand, around the thumb and back between the forefinger and second finger; bend the forefinger over this thread (which passes between it and the second finger), pass it under the thread which crosses the palm of the hand, and then draw the forefinger back, or straighten it, which will give you a loop with crossed threads. Put the needle under the lower part of this loop, which draws from the ball, bring the working-thread (or ball-thread) around the point of needle from right to left, as in plain knitting, draw it back through the loop, slip off the latter, and draw up the left thread. Then proceed to make the crossed loop and knit it off in the same way for the next and following stitches. The whole operation is very simple, although the instructions seem long because explicit. Take your needle and yarn or thread and follow them through carefully, and you will very soon master the "crossed casting on."

Another method, preferred by many and practically the same in effect, except that the edge is not quite so firm, is as follows: Loop the thread around the left forefinger, holding the spare end between thumb and second finger, pass the needle upward through the loop, pass the thread around the point, draw back through the loop, slip off the latter and pull up the spare thread. By passing the needle under the loop, or lower thread, instead of through it, bringing it back through, and then knitting off, you will really get the crossed loop, and many find this method easier than the first. The thread used in casting on may be doubled, particularly for beginning a stocking, mitten, or any article where much wear comes.

Casting on may also be done with two needles, and many like this method when there are many stitches. Twist a loop around the needle held in the left hand, bring the end of thread, or spare thread, to the front, crossing the working-thread to hold it in place—or, if preferred, simply tie a slip-knot and put the loop on the left needle; insert the right needle through this loop from left to right, put thread around point of right needle and draw through the loop, bringing the right needle again in front of left. Thus far, the process is quite like that of plain knitting. Keeping the right needle still in the new stitch or loop, transfer the stitch to the left needle by bringing the latter in front and putting the point through the loop from front to back, leaving the right needle in place for the next stitch; the loops are not slipped off, as in knitting plain, but transferred, so that all are kept on the needle. A little practise will enable one to cast on thus very rapidly and evenly.



The plain knitting (Figure 2), is done as follows: Having cast on the requisite number of stitches, insert the right needle through the front of left needle from left to right, the right needle passing behind the left; carry the thread around point of right needle and bring it down between the two needles, then draw the point of right needle back and through the stitch, forming the new stitch on right needle and letting the other slip off the left, pushing down the point of left needle to facilitate this process; repeat until all the stitches are knitted off and the row is complete. Where there are edges to be joined, as in knitting back and fronts of a sweater, it is a good plan to slip the first stitch of each row.

Right here a suggestion about the method of holding the thread may be of value: By the first method the thread is carried over the little finger of right hand, under second and third fingers and over the tip of the forefinger, which should be held close to the work; it is this finger which passes the thread over point of right needle for the new stitch. By another method the thread is carried over the left forefinger, under second and third and over the little finger, exactly as it is held for crocheting: insert the right needle through 1st stitch on left needle in usual way, push it over the thread on left forefinger, and draw this back through the stitch with the point of right needle. Only the needle is held in the right hand, and many workers claim that the work is much more rapidly done.



The purl- or seam-stitch (Figure 3) is the exact reverse of plain knitting, both as to method of work and appearance, being in reality the wrong side of plain knitting. In the latter the thread is kept at the back of the work; for purling, bring it to the front between the two needles. Put the point of right needle through the front of 1st stitch on left needle from right to left, the right needle being thus brought in front of the left; pass the thread around the front of right needle from right to left and back between needles, then push down the point and draw the loop backward through the stitch, instead of forward, as in plain knitting, the right needle being thus brought behind the left. Slip off the old stitch as usual, and take care to return the thread to its place at the back before beginning to knit plain again.



Garter-stitch, so called (Figure 4) is simply plain knitting back and forth, which gives the effect of ridges, one row knit, the next purled. This is a stitch much used for sweaters, and other knitted garments. If one wishes to have the right side appear as in plain knitting, the 1st row must be knitted plain, the next purled. Since one is the reverse of the other, the right side will be plain knitting, the wrong side purled.



The rib-stitch is alternately plain and purled. To knit the single rib, * knit 1, purl 1; repeat. For double rib, (Figure 5,) * knit 2, purl 2; repeat; and for triple-rib, * knit 3, purl 3; repeat. Any width of rib may be made that is liked, always taking care—unless knitting in rounds, as a wristlet, mitten or stocking—to knit the stitches purled on the preceding row, and purl the knitted ones. There are a large variety of fancy patterns made by combining plain knitting and purling, such as the basket-stitch and others, of even or broken "check."

There are many variations of the simplest stitches; for example, the common garter-stitch gives a particularly good effect if knitted from the back. Put the needle in from right to left, through the back part of the stitch to be knitted; leave the thread behind the needle, then pass it from right to left over the needle and draw it through the stitch, allowing the latter to slip off as in plain knitting. In this stitch the two threads of the loop are crossed, instead of lying side by side as in plain knitting.



"Overs" (Figure 6) are used in all lace patterns, and many times in fancy designs for wool knitting. To make an "over" bring the thread before the needle as if to purl, then knit the next stitch plain as usual. This brings a loop over the needle, which in the next row is to be knitted as any stitch, thus increasing the number of stitches in the row. In case it is not desired to increase the stitches, one must narrow, by knitting two stitches together, once for every "over." If a larger hole is wanted, the thread is put twice over the needle, and in the following one of these loops is knitted, the other purled.

To "purl-narrow," or purl two together, bring the thread to the front as for purling, then to form the extra stitch, carry the thread back over the needle and to the front again; then insert the right needle through two stitches instead of one, and knit them as one stitch. "Fagot" is an abbreviation frequently used for this.



To slip and bind, slip 1st stitch from left needle to the right needle, without knitting it; knit next stitch, then draw the stitch on right needle over the knitted one, letting it fall between needles. To slip, narrow and bind, slip first stitch, knit next two together, and draw the slipped stitch over. To cast off or bind off, (Figure 7,) slip 1st stitch, knit next, draw slipped stitch over, knit next stitch, draw the previous knitted stitch over, and continue, taking care that the chain of stitches thus cast off be neither too tight nor too loose, but just as elastic as the remainder of the work.



A Sleeveless Sweater



A sleeveless sweater, as pretty as it is comfortable, requires six skeins of Shetland floss and a pair of No. 5 amber needles. Pink floss was chosen for the model, but any preferred color may be substituted.

Cast on 85 stitches; knit in basket-stitch, as follows:

1. * Knit 5, purl 5; repeat across, ending with knit 5.

2. Purl 5, knit 5; repeat across, ending with purl 5.

Repeat these two rows twice, making 6 rows in all; then to change the check knit 7th row like 2d, 8th like 1st, repeat twice, and again change the check by repeating from 1st row. Continue until the border is five checks deep, or 30 rows.

Knit across plain and purl back for 84 rows; narrow 1 stitch each side every other row, three times, for the armhole, leaving 79 stitches on your needle, and giving 89 rows from the border. Knit across plain and purl back for 38 rows; putting these stitches on a large safety-pin for convenience, knit 31, bind off 17 stitches for neck, and on the remaining 31 stitches, knit 6 rows back and forth, or 3 ribs, to give the effect of a seam on the shoulder. Continue the front, knitting across and purling back, adding a stitch toward the front each time to make the neck V-shaped, for 38 rows; then add 1 stitch at the armhole, and next row cast on 8 stitches for underarm. Do not widen further toward the front, but continue knitting forward and purling back for 85 rows; then make the border of 30 rows, five checks wide, to correspond with the back, and bind off. Knit the other front to correspond.

Pick up the stitches around armhole, 80 in all, and knit 5, purl 5 for 6 rows, making an edge of checks; bind off. Pick up the stitches on front, to the center of back of neck, about 175 in all, make a row of checks to correspond with the arm, and bind; work a border in the same way on other side of front, and sew neatly at back of neck, also join the underarm seams, taking care to match the checks of the border perfectly.

For the belt: Cast on 25 stitches, and proceed as directed for the border until you have the desired length; the belt illustrated is 42 checks long. Across one end crochet 3 chain loops, filling these with doubles, and sew to the other end three pearl buttons to match. The belt is caught along the top in the back, giving the short-waisted effect.



Costume for the Winter-Girl



Materials: Thirteen skeins of Shetland floss (dark rose was used for the model, but any preferred color may be substituted), three balls of gray Angora, one pair each of bone knitting-needles, No. 3 and No. 5, and a steel crochet-hook, No. 6.

For the sweater: Using No. 5 needles, cast on for the back 100 stitches (these will measure 20 inches). Knit plain, back and forth (which will give you ridges or ribs) for 2 inches; then decrease a stitch at each end of needle every 8th row, to shape the back, until there are 76 stitches on the needle, measuring 15 inches (this is the waistline); knit on these stitches for 9 1/2 inches from the waistline, then decrease 1 stitch at each end of needle every other row for 3 times, or until 70 stitches remain, and knit on these stitches until the back measures 15 1/2 inches from the waistline. Knit 25 stitches off on a spare needle, bind off 20 stitches for back of neck, and on the other 25 stitches knit one front after the following directions, and the other to correspond.

Front: Knit in ridges as usual, increasing 1 stitch toward the front every other row until you have added 6 stitches; cast on 7 stitches more toward the front, giving 38 stitches on the needle; knit in ridges, increasing 1 stitch toward armhole every other row until 12 stitches have been added, then cast on 10 stitches toward the underarm, making 60 stitches on the needle (about 12 inches). Knit on the 60 stitches for 9 1/2 inches, then increase 1 stitch every 8th row toward the underarm- or side-seam, until the latter is of the same length as that of the back, including the 2 inches. Do not bind off. Knit other front to correspond and sew up side-seams.

With a needle pick up 1 stitch from each ridge on front (have an uneven number of stitches on needle), and on another spare needle pick up the stitches across the back; on another pick up the stitches of front, having the same number of stitches on needle; tie a thread in 1st stitch on needle at bottom of each front, toward the front, which will be the corner stitch.

1. With bone needles No. 5 start at top of left front, knit 1, * over, narrow, repeat from * to the corner stitch, over, knit the corner stitch, again repeat from * to next corner, over, knit corner stitch, repeat from * until but 1 stitch remains, over, knit last stitch.

2. Knit plain, each "over" forming a stitch to take the place of narrowed one.

3. Knit to corner stitch, over, knit corner stitch, over, knit to next corner stitch, over, knit corner stitch, over, and knit plain to end of row.

Repeat 2d and 3d rows until there are 4 ridges or 9 rows from the beginning.

In next row make the buttonholes thus: Knit 2 stitches from the neck, bind off 4 stitches for the buttonhole, then knit 13, bind off 4, and repeat, making 8 buttonholes 13 stitches apart. In next row cast on 4 stitches over where they were bound off, then repeat 2d and 3d rows for 4 more ridges, and bind off.

Sleeves.—Cast on 34 stitches (about 7 1/2 inches); knit in ridges, casting on 2 stitches at each end of needle every other row until there are 74 stitches on needle (about 15 inches), knit 1 inch, then decrease 1 stitch at each end of needle every 12th row until there are 56 stitches remaining on needle, knit on these until the sleeves measure 17 inches, or desired length, (knit 1 row, purl 1 row) twice, knit 13 ridges for cuff, then with gray Angora and No. 3 needles knit 7 ridges, bind off, and sew up sleeves and cuffs.

Collar.—Using the dark rose pick up 84 stitches around neck of sweater (not the border), knit 30 ridges; do not bind off. With a spare needle pick up 1 stitch from each ridge on each end of collar; with gray Angora and No. 3 needles repeat 3d and 2d rows alternately for border until there are 7 ridges, and bind off.

Pockets.—Cast on 28 stitches; knit in ridges for 4 inches, change to Angora and No. 3 needles, knit 7 ridges, making a buttonhole in 4th ridge at center of pocket, bind off and sew the pocket neatly in place on the sweater. Sew the sleeves in.

Belt.—With dark rose cast on 23 stitches (about 4 1/2 inches), knit in ridges until the belt is the width of the back at waistline, bind off and sew in place with two buttons at each side.

Buttons.—With dark rose, chain 3, turn; miss 1 stitch, 8 doubles in next; 2 doubles in each of 8 doubles; * 2 doubles in 1st double, 1 in next; repeat from * until the circle is of a size to cover the mold, work 1 row without widening, slip the mold in, * work around with 1 double in a stitch, miss 1, repeating from last * until closed. If preferred, a small square may be knitted like the body of the sweater and used to cover mold.

The skating-cap is 23 inches head-size, and requires three skeins of the dark-rose floss, two balls of gray Angora wool and 4 steel needles No. 8.

Using the Angora wool, cast on 136 stitches; knit 45 on each of 2 needles and 46 stitches on the 3d, and knit in single rib (knit 1, purl 1) in rounds for 1 1/2 inches, change to the rose floss and knit in single rib for 1 inch; change to Angora, again knit in single rib for 1 1/2 inches; change to rose floss and knit in single rib until the top measures 14 1/2 inches, then bind off and draw together, leaving sufficient opening for the tassel to be sewed in.

Tassel.—Using the rose floss, cut about 40 strands 8 inches long, tie in the center, fold where tied and tie again below. Sew the tassel at top of cap.

Scarf.—Materials required are four skeins of dark rose Shetland floss, two balls of gray Angora wool, and one pair each of No. 3 and No. 5 bone knitting-needles. With gray Angora wool and No. 3 needles cast on 60 stitches, and knit 7 ridges; change to rose floss and No. 5 needles and knit 7 ridges, change to Angora wool and No. 3 needles, and again knit 7 ridges, change to rose floss and No. 5 needles and knit for 50 inches, or length of scarf desired; then, as at beginning, knit 7 ridges of Angora, 7 ridges of rose and again 7 ridges of Angora; bind off.

Knitted Gloves.—Materials required are three skeins of Shetland floss, and four steel knitting-needles, No. 12. Use two threads of the floss at once.

Cast 16 stitches on each of 3 needles. Knit in single rib (knit 1, purl 1) for 44 rounds, or until the wrist is as long as desired, then knit 16 rounds plain.

61. Knit to within 4 stitches of end of round, widen 1, knit 4, widen 1.

62, 63, 64, 65. Knit plain.

Repeat the last 5 rounds, increasing 2 stitches every 5th round until you have 10 stitches between the two widening points, and 58 stitches on the needles.

To form the thumb, knit 7 stitches on each of 2 needles and cast on 4 stitches between the widening points, thus making 18 stitches on 3 needles.

Knit 22 rounds plain. * Narrow, knit 1; repeat around; knit 1 round plain; repeat from *. Narrow until the thumb is closed, draw the wool through, and leave an end to fasten down on the wrong side.

Pick up the 4 stitches cast on at base of thumb, making 48 stitches on the hand. Knit 15 rounds, then divide the stitches as follows: Slip 24 stitches on one knitting-needle for top of hand starting from the 3d cast-on stitch at beginning of thumb, and the remaining 24 stitches for palm of hand on another needle.

First Finger: Knit 6 stitches from top of hand, slip remaining 18 stitches on a safety-pin, also 18 stitches from palm of hand on another safety-pin, cast on 3 stitches for between fingers, knit remaining 6 from palm of hand, making 15 stitches in all, on these knit 30 rounds, and finish off as directed for the thumb.

Second Finger: Knit 7 stitches from back of hand, cast on 3 stitches, knit 6 stitches from palm of hand, and pick up 3 stitches cast on at base of first finger, making 19 stitches on needle; * knit 1 round plain; knit to last 2 stitches of round, which will be 2 of the stitches picked up, narrow; repeat from * twice, and on the 16 stitches remaining knit 28 rounds more, 34 rounds in all; narrow off like the thumb.

Third Finger: Knit 6 stitches from safety-pin at top of hand, cast on 3 stitches, knit 6 from palm of hand, and pick up 3 stitches at base of second finger, making 18 stitches in all; knit 1st 6 rounds as directed for 2d finger, knit 25 more rounds on remaining 15 stitches, and narrow off as thumb.

Fourth Finger: Knit 5 stitches from back of hand on 1 needle, 6 stitches from palm on another, pick up 3 stitches at base of 3d finger on 3d needle, knit 26 rounds on the 14 stitches, then narrow off as the thumb.

These directions are for the left glove. Knit the right glove in same way to where you divide the stitches for the fingers; then remember that the palm of the glove must be toward you, the thumb on the right-hand side. So you would first knit 6 stitches from palm, cast on 3, and knit 7 from back of hand, reversing directions as given for left glove.



Children's Knitted Sets

Set No. 1



Hood.—Cast on 80 stitches, and knit back and forth for 70 rows, or 35 ribs; then join the color and knit 6 ribs, and bind off evenly. Sew up the edge where you cast on for the back of the hood. Fold the border back its width, and pick up the stitches across end of this and the 6 ribs back of it on the body of hood, then the stitches around neck and the other side of border, knit 3 ribs, then in next row, knit 4, over, narrow, and repeat, ending with knit 3. This row forms the holes for the cord. Knit back plain, knit 3 more ribs and bind off.

The hood may be of any desired size by casting on any number of stitches, and knitting just half that number of ribs.

Scarf.—Cast on 30 stitches (or 35 for a little wider scarf); knit 14 ribs of blue, 3 of gray, 2 of blue, 1 of gray and 2 of blue; then knit 34 inches of gray, 2 ribs of blue and continue with the other end as at first, reversing the order. Knot fringe of the two colors in at each end.

Sweater.—Cast on 60 stitches, and knit 2, purl 2 (or double rib) for two inches. Knit plain for 100 rows (or 50 ribs, if you knit back and forth; the model was knitted forward and purled back, to give the work the appearance of plain knitting on the right side). Cast on 42 stitches for sleeve, knit back and cast on 42 stitches for the other sleeve; knit 30 rows on this length, then take 65 stitches off on an extra needle, bind off 14 stitches for neck, and on the remaining 65 stitches work 12 rows; then cast on 13 stitches toward the front and on this length knit 28 rows, bind off 42 stitches for the sleeve, work 18 rows on the remaining stitches, slip these on an extra needle, work the other front to correspond, slip all the stitches on one needle, knit until the front is as long as the back, and finish with the double rib for two inches; bind off evenly.

Using the color, pick up the stitches at the end of sleeve and knit back and forth for 12 rows; bind off. Sew up the sleeves and underarm seams and turn back the cuffs.

For the collar pick up the stitches around the neck, knit 8 rows of gray, then 6 rows of color, and bind off.

Work around edge of collar and down the front opening with double crochet, 1 chain between; lace up the front with cord, ends finished with balls or tassels.

Set No. 2



Jacket.—Cast on 52 stitches and knit 60 rows or 30 ribs; cast on 26 stitches for sleeve, knit back and cast on 26 stitches for the other sleeve. Knit 34 rows, then knit 43 stitches, bind off 18 stitches for the neck, knit remaining 43 stitches, and on these continue with the front. Knit 6 rows, then continue knitting back and forth, adding a stitch at the end of each row toward the front for 22 rows, which will give 11 extra stitches; knit 6 rows without widening, then bind off 26 stitches, and knit remainder of front to correspond with the back.

Knit the other front in same way, sew up sleeves and underarm seams, work around the neck with double crochet, in color, 1 chain between, and around the body of the jacket with shells of three trebles in a stitch, miss space of two ribs; repeat. With the gray make 2 trebles, picot of 3 chain caught in last treble and 1 treble around neck, and between 1st and 2d trebles of shells around body of jacket. Finish edge of sleeves in the same way, and run in cord and balls.

For the Hood.—Cast on 64 stitches, knit 28 ribs, then 2 ribs of color and 2 of gray; bind off, sew up the back of hood where cast on, finish around the neck with double crochet, space of 2 chain between, using color, work the shells around front of hood, and finish with the shells of gray, as for jacket. Run in the cord, with balls of the two colors of yarn.

The cords may be done in plain crochet, the ordinary chain or, as preferred because stronger, knotted by what is called the "fool's delight" method, although why named thus it is impossible to say. Surely it seems a very sensible way: Take a length of yarn six times as long as the cord is wanted; make a slip or half knot at one end and pass the other end down through it to form a loop, then tie the ends of yarn together. Hold this knot between thumb and forefinger of one hand, say the right, with the yarn which pulls through the knot under the same hand, and the loop which was formed held on the forefinger; hold the yarn which does not pull in the left hand, pass the forefinger of the left hand through the loop on right forefinger from front to back, catch up and pull through the non-pulling or left-hand thread—exactly as you would make a chain-stitch in crochet—transfer the knot (which ties the two ends together) to the thumb and forefinger of left hand, keeping the loop over forefinger, and draw up the pulling yarn. Now the position of the loop, pulling yarn and knot is exactly the same in the left hand as formerly in the right. Continue by passing the forefinger of right hand through the loop, catching up the non-pulling thread and drawing it through to form the new loop (on right hand again), transfer the knot and pull up. This is really a sort of double chain, and when one has learned to make it evenly and well, it will be found superior for bags, lingerie, and many other articles requiring a drawstring or cord.



A Serviceable Sweater



Use fourfold Germantown zephyr and a pair of No. 5 needles, with one pair two sizes smaller. As the sizes or numbers of needles vary, and also do methods of knitting, it is a good plan to work a little block before beginning the pattern. Cast on, say, 12 stitches, knit across and purl back, repeating these two rows until you have a square. There should be 5 stitches to the inch in width, and seven rows should make an inch in length. If you get less, use larger needles, say No. 6.

It is also a good plan to practise on the pattern a little, so that you will become familiar with it and can narrow or widen and still keep the ridge. Cast on any number of stitches divisible by four, with one stitch over, knit 2, purl 2, until but one stitch remains, and knit that. All rows are the same, the odd stitch breaking the rib and making a ridge. When you come to the decreasing later you can tell whether you are keeping the pattern correct, by watching the knitted stitch, which forms a sort of chain right on top of the ridge, and must be kept throughout.

Left front: Cast on 65 stitches on the larger needles and knit 12 rows plain for the band at lower edge.

13. Knit 10 (these stitches are for the plain border up the front), * purl 2, knit 2, repeat from *, knitting last stitch.

14. Slip 1, purl 1, * knit 2, purl 2, repeat from *, knitting last 10. Repeat these two rows until you have 110 rows in all.

111. Knit 2, narrow, knit 6; finish row in pattern.

112. In pattern until 9 stitches remain, knit these.

113. Knit 2, narrow, knit 5; continue in pattern.

114. In pattern, knitting last 8 stitches.

115. Knit 2, narrow, knit 4; continue in pattern.

116. Like 114th, knitting 7 at end.

117. Knit 2, narrow, knit 3; continue in pattern.

118. Like 114th, knitting last 6.

119. Knit 2, narrow, knit 2; continue in pattern.

120. Bind off 3, knit in pattern to within 5 stitches of end, knit these.

121. Knit 2, narrow, knit 1; continue in pattern.

122. Like 120th row, knitting 4 at end.

123. Knit 2, narrow; continue in pattern.

124. Like 120th row, knitting 3 at end.

125, 127, 129. Like 123d row.

126, 128. Bind off 1, knit in pattern until 3 stitches remain, knit these.

130. Knit in pattern until 3 stitches remain, knit these.

Continue to work until you have completed the 171st row, doing the odd rows like the 123d and even rows like 130th, when you should have 23 stitches on the needle. From this point work until you have completed the 183d row, increasing at beginning of 172d, 176th and 180th rows by knitting in the back, then in the front of the 2d stitch. You should then have 20 stitches on the needle. Knit one plain row (the 184th) and bind off.

Right front: Begin like left front, doing 12 plain rows.

13. Knit 10, * knit 2, purl 2, repeat from * to end, knitting last stitch.

14. Knit 2, purl 2, repeat until 11 stitches remain, purl 1, knit 10. Repeat last two rows until you have 27 rows in all.

28. Knit as usual until you have the 10 border stitches remaining, knit 3, bind off 3, knit 4.

29. Knit 4, cast on 3, knit 3, and continue as usual. This forms the buttonhole. Make five buttonholes at equal distances apart, and begin the narrowing for collar in the 11th row, continuing like left front.

Back: Cast on 79 stitches and knit 12 rows plain; then work in the pattern until you have 120 rows in all, which brings the work to the armhole.

121. Bind off 2 stitches and knit remainder as usual, taking care to keep the pattern. Repeat this row seven times, when you will have taken 8 stitches from each side. Knit 48 rows in pattern on the remaining 63 stitches.

177, 178. Knit in pattern until within 7 stitches of the end; turn, leaving these stitches on left-hand needle without knitting.

179, 180. Knit in pattern to within 13 stitches of the end (including the 7 stitches previously left), turn.

181, 182. Knit in pattern to within 19 stitches of end, turn.

183. Knit 4, narrow, (knit 5, narrow) twice, knit rest plain, to end of needle.

184. Knit plain entirely across, and bind off.

Sleeves. Cast on 97 stitches.

1. Knit 40, * purl 2, knit 2, repeat from * 3 times, purl 1, turn.

2. Slip 1, knit 1, * purl 2, knit 2, repeat from * 4 times, knit 1, turn.

3. Slip 1, knit 1, * purl 2, knit 2, repeat from * 5 times, purl 2, knit 1, turn.

4. Slip 1, purl 1, * knit 2, purl 2, repeat from * 7 times, knit 1, turn.

5. Slip 1, purl 1, * knit 2, purl 2, repeat from * 8 times, knit 3, turn.

6. Slip 1, knit 1, * purl 2, knit 2, repeat from * 10 times, knit 1, turn.

7. Slip 1, knit 1, * purl 2, knit 2, repeat from * 11 times, purl 2, knit 1, turn.

8. Slip 1, purl 1, * knit 2, purl 2, repeat from * 13 times, knit 1, turn.

9. Slip 1, purl 1, * knit 2, purl 2, repeat from * 14 times, knit 3, turn.

10. Slip 1, knit 1, * purl 2, knit 2, repeat from * 16 times, knit 1, turn.

11. Slip 1 knit 1, * purl 2, knit 2, repeat from * 17 times, purl 2, knit 1, turn.

12. Slip 1, purl 1, * knit 2, purl 2, repeat from * until but 7 stitches remain, turn.

13. Like 12th row, leaving 4 stitches at end.

14. Slip 1, knit 1, * purl 2, knit 2, repeat to end, knitting last stitch.

15. Slip 1, purl 1, * knit 2, purl 2, repeat to end, knitting last stitch. Continue to knit in pattern, decreasing at beginning and end of every 8th row until 73 stitches remain, then knit without decreasing until you have 120 rows, counting from the 15th row.

Take the smaller needles and commence the cuff on the sleeve-stitches as follows: Slip 1, (narrow, knit 2) 3 times, (narrow, knit 1) 14 times, narrow, knit 2, to end of row.

Repeat last 3 rows until you end with 2 stitches and bind off.

Pockets.—With the larger needles cast on 23 stitches.

1. Knit 1, * knit 2, purl 2, repeat from * across, ending with knit 2.

2. Slip 1, * purl 2, knit 2, repeat, ending with purl 1, knit 1.

3. Slip 1, * knit 2, purl 2, repeat, ending with knit 2.

Repeat last two rows until you have 32 rows in pattern, then knit 10 rows plain for top of pocket and bind off.

To make up the coat, first press the border of fronts; stretch into shape, pin to an ironing-board, cover with a damp cloth and press with a fairly hot iron until the cloth is dry. This will prevent the coat from drawing up, as the ribs are inclined to do. For sewing, use a blunt-pointed needle to avoid splitting the wool. Sew up the side and shoulder-seams, taking a stitch from each edge and keeping the edges perfectly even, being careful not to draw the sewing-yarn so tightly as to pucker the seam in the least. Sew up the sleeves, and place the sleeve-seam an inch to the front of the side-seam, easing in any fulness there is around the top. Place the center of collar at center of back before sewing on; this must be done on right side of coat, and the collar turned over. Sew on the pockets, matching the ridges, and sew on five pearl or bone buttons, about three-fourths of an inch in diameter, to correspond with the buttonholes, placing a small pearl button at the back of the larger one on wrong side of coat and sewing through both together.

This coat measures twenty-six inches from shoulder to hem. It may easily be made longer, if desired, but the model is an excellent one for ordinary wear, and very "natty," and it has the merit of being quickly knitted.

As has been suggested, a good way to do, when knitting a sweater in any stitch, is to have a pattern and work to fit that. First, have a coat cut from any old cloth, and of any style desired. Seam it up and try it on, having it fitted nicely, then cut along the seam and take apart. Fasten the different parts on a smooth surface by means of thumbtacks and knit to measure, without stretching your work.



Ladies' Sweater



This sweater requires five skeins of knitting-worsted, and four balls of Angora; electric blue for the body of the garment, and gray Angora were combined in the model, but other colors may be chosen at pleasure. The work is done in plain knitting, back and forth, with ribbed belt. With the knitting-worsted and No. 5 needles, cast on 119 stitches for the back, which will measure about twenty-four inches, and knit 48 ribs, or 96 rows. Next row, * narrow, knit 4; repeat from *. Then change to No. 12 steel needles and do 20 rows in triple rib (knit 3, purl 3) for the belt. Change to No. 5 needles and knit 20 ribs; then decrease 1 stitch at end of needle every other row five times. Knit 29 ribs plain, or without decreasing. Next row, knit 34 stitches, slip them on to a spare needle, bind off 21 stitches for neck, and on the remaining 34 stitches, knit 4 ribs; then cast on 30 stitches at the neck, knit 29 ribs, increase 1 stitch at armhole every other row five times, and knit 22 ribs plain. Change to the steel needles, and work the belt as directed for the back, (purl 3, knit 3,) starting from front edge. Having completed the belt—20 rows of triple rib—change to No. 5 needles; * knit 4, increase 1 stitch, repeat from *. Then knit 48 ribs and bind off on the wrong side. Knit the other front to correspond, omitting buttonholes if these are used.

For the sleeve: Working on right side of sweater, pick up 1 stitch on each rib around the armhole, 72 stitches in all; knit 8 ribs, then decrease 1 stitch at each end of needle every 8th rib, eight times. Change to steel needles and knit 12 ribs for the wrist; change to the larger (No. 5) needles, * knit 4, narrow; repeat across, then knit 12 ribs, join the Angora, knit 7 ribs, and bind off.

Collar: Using No. 5 needles and the knitting-worsted, cast on 65 stitches; knit 28 ribs. Join the Angora wool, knit 11 rows, increasing 1 stitch at each end of needle every other row, and bind off. Working on right side of collar pick up 1 stitch on each rib at the side, knit 11 rows, increasing 1 stitch every other row toward the corner and keeping the neck edge even, and bind off. Make the other side of collar to correspond and sew up the mitered corners. The border of Angora wool may be as much wider as one chooses to make it by adding more rows or ribs.

Two large buttons covered with the knitting-worsted—either knitted or crocheted—and furnished with a loop sewed on each side, are used to fasten the belt.

For the buttons: Using a bone hook which will carry the yarn, make a chain of 3 stitches, turn, and in 2d stitch of chain make 8 doubles; in next round make 2 doubles in each stitch, working in both veins so there will be no rib; then make 1 double in 1st stitch, 2 in next, and repeat. Continue to work around and around until you have a circle which will cover the button-mold—5 rounds in all were required for top of buttons used on model, work around without widening, slip in the mold, then * miss 1, a double in next, and repeat until the cover is closed. If preferred, knit a tiny square as you did the body of the garment; and use this to cover the mold, drawing it snugly over, and fastening underneath. For the loop, make a chain of 30 stitches, turn and make a double in each stitch; fasten securely beneath the button.



Ladies' Knitted Gloves with Fancy Backs



Use No. 16 steel needles, with Spanish knitting-yarn or worsted. Cast on 57 stitches.

1. Purl 2, slip and bind, (over, knit 1) 5 times, over, narrow, purl 2, knit 6; repeat twice.

2. Purl 2, knit 13, purl 2, knit 6; repeat.

3. Purl 2, slip and bind, knit 9, narrow, purl 2, knit 6; repeat.

4. Purl 2, slip and bind, knit 7, narrow, purl 2, knit 6; repeat.

5. Same as 4th row.

6. Purl 2, slip and bind, (over, knit 1) 5 times, over, narrow, purl 2, take 3 of the 6 stitches off on a separate needle, hold this at back of work, knit next 3 stitches, then knit the 3 on separate needle; repeat.

Continue in pattern, twisting the "cable" as directed every 6th row, until the wrist is seven patterns in length. Then carry one cable up back of hand, with an openwork stripe each side, and knit plain across palm.

Commence thumb at top of wrist. As the gloves are right and left, care must be taken in starting the thumb so that both will not be for the same hand. On the left-hand glove the thumb is started at right of the stripe, on the right-hand glove at the left of stripe. Begin thumb with widen, knit 1, widen; knit 3 rows as usual, then widen, knit 3, widen; continue in this way until you have widened the thumb to 17 stitches. Put these on 2 needles, on a 3d needle cast on 7 stitches, join and knit once around, in each of next 3 rounds narrow 1 of the 7 stitches, arrange the stitches evenly on 3 needles, knit two inches, then narrow at end of each needle until you have 6 remaining, put these on 2 needles and bind off.

Continuing with the hand, pick up the 7 stitches cast on at base of thumb, knit to the base of the little finger, and divide the stitches on 2 needles, or, if more convenient, take them off on a twine. For the little finger: Take 8 stitches from back needle and 8 from front, and cast on 6 stitches, knit once around plain, narrow off 1 of the 6 stitches in each of next 5 rounds, knit 2 inches, narrow 1 stitch at end of each needle until 6 stitches remain, put these on 2 needles and bind off.

First Finger: Pick up the 6 stitches cast on for little finger, knit to the middle, take 8 stitches from each side next the thumb, cast on 6 stitches for inside of finger, knit once around plain, in next 4 rounds narrow off 1 of the 6 stitches, knit two and one-half inches, and finish off as before.

Third Finger: Pick up the 6 stitches cast on for first finger, knit them, knit plain, leaving 9 stitches toward little finger, putting these on separate needle, 9 stitches from other side, cast on 6 stitches, knit until you get to those left for little finger, narrow 1 of these and 1 of the 6 each time around for 6 rounds, knit two and one-half inches, and finish off as directed.

Middle Finger: Pick up the 6 from last finger, knit around plain, proceed as directed for third finger, knit two and three-fourths inches plain and finish off.



Knitted Slippers with Ermine Trimming



Materials required are three skeins fourfold Germantown yarn, two colors, and one yard of ribbon. Pink and white yarn, with a little black, and pink ribbon are used for the slippers illustrated.

Cast on 15 stitches with white yarn, using medium-size steel needles. Knit back and forth until you have a perfect square of white, then join the color. The square is for the toe of slipper.

Knit back and forth on the 15 stitches until you have a strip long enough to extend around the sole of slipper and join to the square on other side, leaving two sides and one corner for the toe.

Darn the white with black; beginning at lower right-hand corner, bring the needle through the first two ribs and down between next two, miss three ribs, keeping the long thread on the wrong side, and repeat, having every other row alternate. This may be done before the strip is joined to opposite side of square, if more convenient. Sew to the sole, using strong thread and over-and-over stitches. The strip should be stretched somewhat during the sewing, in order to make the slipper cling well to the foot.

For the border: Cast on 10 stitches with white and knit plain, back and forth, until the strip is long enough to go around the top. Darn with the black yarn, making three rows, over one rib and under three, alternating the stitches. Sew to top of slipper, turn back, and put on the bows.

These slippers are very easily knitted, extremely pretty and may be made to fit any size of sole. For a larger slipper cast on an additional number of stitches for the square, which will make the strip proportionally wider; knit it long enough for the larger sole, and make the border wider, if desired. A smaller slipper is begun with less stitches, following the same general directions.



Babies' Long Bootees



Two colors of Saxony, blue and white or pink and white, and two steel knitting-needles, No. 14, are required for these bootees.

With color, cast on 57 stitches.

1. Knit plain.

2. With white, knit 4, over, knit 3, * slip, narrow and bind, knit 3, over, knit 1, over, knit 3; repeat from * to end of row.

3. Purl.

Repeat last 2 rows three times; with color knit 2 rows; with white repeat 2d and 3d rows twice, and again knit 2 rows plain with color and 2 rows plain with white.

With white knit 14 rows of single rib (knit 1, purl 1).

With color knit 2 rows plain; then with white knit 8 rows in single rib; repeat the last 10 rows, and again knit 2 rows plain, with color.

With white knit 1 row, purl 1 row, alternately, for 4 rows; this gives the appearance of plain knitting on the right side.

Make a row of spaces in which to run ribbon, thus: Knit 2, * over 3 times, narrow, knit 1; repeat from * to end of row. Purl back, dropping 2 of the "overs."

Again knit forward and purl back for 5 rows; then knit 15 rows in single rib, completing the leg.

For the instep: Slip 1st 18 stitches on to the needle, join in the color, knit 21 stitches, turn and knit back. With white knit 1 row and purl 1 row, alternately, for 6 rows. Repeat last 8 rows three times, which will give four white stripes and the same of narrow ones, in color; again knit forward and back with color.

For the slipper or foot, using color, knit off 18 stitches on right-hand needle, pick up and knit 17 stitches along the side of instep, knit 21 across instep, pick up 17 on other side and knit the 18 stitches on left needle. Knit back and forth plain for 20 rows and bind off. Sew up the foot and back of leg, and draw ribbon through the spaces.

These bootees come up well to the knee, and are warm as well as pretty. The ribbed portions cause them to fit snugly, so they are not likely to slip down and off the little feet.



Child's Knitted Mittens



Use Saxony yarn with needles of suitable size, as you knit tight or loose. No. 17 is a good average size. Cast 18 stitches on each of three needles.

Knit 2, purl 1; repeat, until the wrist is of length desired, say two inches.

For the pattern, knit as follows:

1. Purl.

2, 3, 4. Knit 2, purl 1.

These 4 rows are repeated throughout.

Begin to widen for the thumb in the 2d row above the wrist; to widen pick up a stitch between needles and knit it, knit 1, widen, and continue in pattern. Knit 2 rows, in pattern, and again widen, knit 3, widen, across base of thumb. Continue in this way, adding 2 stitches between the widenings every 3d row, and keeping as closely as possible to the pattern, until you have 21 stitches across the thumb. Knit around twice in pattern and take the thumb-stitches off on a strong thread.

Knit around in pattern, and when you come to the thumb cast on 7 stitches, or one third the number widened for the thumb. Continue knitting the hand to the tip of the little finger, then commence narrowing. The manner in which this is done depends on the shape of the hand to be fitted. For an ordinary mitten, narrow every 5th stitch, and knit 5 times around; then narrow every 4th stitch and knit 4 times around; every 3d stitch and knit 3 times around; every 2d stitch and knit twice around; then narrow, knit 1, repeat around, knit once around, narrow every stitch, draw yarn through, and darn the end neatly and securely. It is an excellent plan to "run" the tip of a mitten on the wrong side, as you do the heel of a stocking, since it makes it wear longer, especially if intended for rough usage. The narrowing of a child's mitten may begin with every 4th stitch. Also, if the hand is long and slender, an additional row may be knitted between the widenings for the thumb.

Take the stitches off the thread on 2 needles, and with the 3d pick up and knit the stitches across the hand, which were cast on. When knitting around the first time, narrow once each end of the picked-up stitches.

Even the stitches on the needles, and knit around in pattern until you reach the base of the nail, then narrow off, beginning with once in 3 stitches. Draw through the last stitches at tip and darn down.



Knee-Cap



Elderly people, or those at all inclined to rheumatic twinges, appreciate the knee-cap, and a pair of them will make a most acceptable gift to grandpa or grandma. No. 12 steel needles and Germantown yarn were used for the model, which may be made more or less heavy, as desired, by choosing coarser or finer yarn.

Cast 35 stitches upon each of three needles and knit around 30 times in single rib—that is, knit 1, purl 1, alternately. You are now ready to begin the gore, which may be done in single rib, like the rest, or in basket-stitch (or other fancy pattern) as in the model.

Take 26 stitches on one needle, leaving all other stitches idle; take a stitch from each side every time across until but 42 stitches are left on both idle needles. Narrow at the end of the busy needle each time until but 26 stitches are left on the busy needle. Take up 23 stitches on the selvage at each side, divide the stitches evenly on the three needles, and you should have the original number of 35 stitches on each of the needles. Again knit 30 rows in single rib, bind off loosely, and finish with a simple crocheted border of chain-loops or shells caught down in every other stitch.

To knit the gore in basket-stitch, * purl 6, knit 2; repeat for 3 rows, then knit 1 row plain; repeat 1st 3 rows, placing the 2 plain stitches exactly in the center of the 6 purled stitches of previous rows. This change, made after each plain row, gives the woven- or basket-effect, and the pattern is a very pretty one for sweaters.



Wristers or Pulse-Warmers



Wristers or pulse-warmers, are very comfortable on a cold day, and those described particularly so, as they fill the sleeve and completely exclude the wind. Using knitting-worsted, or yarn of any desired size or quality with needles to correspond, such as would be employed for a man's knitted sock, cast 18 to 22 stitches on each of 3 needles, and knit 2, purl 2, alternately, for 35 rows or more, according to length required. Bind off loosely.

With bone crochet-hook work in straight rows from top to bottom, putting a treble in every other stitch and 2 chain-stitches between trebles; after the last treble at the edge chain 2, miss a row and return on the next.

Having completed the rows of spaces, make 2 trebles in 1st space, 3 in next, and repeat, working back and forth until all the spaces are filled. A very attractive finish is to work a row of doubles in color, making a double in each treble. With fine wool, crochet-silk may be prettily used for this finish.

A fringed wrister may be made on the foundation described by holding a pencil on lengthwise with the left hand, and with the right sewing over and over it; make the rows quite close together, cut the wound yarn open with a pair of sharp scissors, and brush lightly across it, back and forth, until the cut ends become "mossy" or fluffed up.



Motor-Scarf



This motor-scarf may be of pink and white, or any preferred colors of Shetland floss. Use wooden needles and cast on 100 stitches with pink.

1, 3. Purl.

2. Knit plain.

4. Knit 3, over twice, narrow; repeat across, ending with knit 3.

5. Purl, dropping 2d of the over-twice loops.

6. Knit plain.

7, 9. With white, purl.

8, 10. Knit plain.

Repeat until the scarf is of the length required. The sides are finished with shells, in white, making 8 trebles, well drawn out, in the center of the pink stripe, and fastening in center of white stripe with 1 double.

Finish the ends with fringe knotted in, six inches long and composed of 10 threads each of pink and white.



Sport Scarf



A very attractive scarf uses brown Shetland as a body color, with deep cream-color, green and rose in combination with the brown for stripes. Using No. 3 1/2 or No. 4 bone needles, cast on 84 stitches and knit back and forth for 64 rows or 32 ribs; then join in the cream-color and knit (4 rows of cream, 2 rows of brown) 5 times, 10 rows of cream, (2 of brown, 4 of cream) 5 times; 64 rows of brown; join in green, (4 rows of green, 2 of brown) 3 times; 10 rows of green; (2 of brown, 4 of green) 3 times; 64 rows of brown; (4 of rose, 2 of brown) 3 times; 10 of rose; (2 of brown, 4 of rose) 3 times; * 64 rows of brown. Reverse from *, making the other end of scarf as directed for first half.

For the fringe, cut strands of brown six inches long, and knot a strand in each stitch.

For a lighter scarf use No. 4 bone needles and cast on 48 or 50 stitches. The larger needles with loose knitting will give work much more open. If desired one may introduce rows of fancy knitting instead of the colored stripes. In fact, having made one scarf, the worker will find it possible to vary it in many ways, and will find such variation a pleasing study.

Many like to use a thread of silk or mercerized crochet-cotton with the Shetland floss or other wool which may be chosen.



Scarf in Lattice-Stitch



Using Shetland floss and No. 4 bone needles, cast on as many stitches as required for width of scarf, using a multiple of 6 with 2 over.

Knit back and forth 6 times.

7. Knit 1, over 3 times; repeat, knitting last stitch.

8. Knit 1, draw up the loop about one inch in length, (drop the "overs," and slip the knitted stitch) 6 times, slip the 6 long stitches to left-hand needle, draw the last 3 over 1st 3, knitting each, then knit the 1st 3, and repeat, knitting 1 at end of row. Take care the long stitches are not twisted.

9. 10, 11. Knit plain.

Repeat from 7th row.

Gather up the ends of the scarf and finish with cord and tassel, or a bow of ribbon, as preferred.



Knitting for the Red Cross

(Official Red Cross Photographs)

Sleeveless Sweater



Three hanks of gray or khaki knitting-yarn (3/4 pound), fivefold, and a pair of amber needles No. 5, or No. 3 Red Cross needles will be needed; 11 stitches should measure two inches. Cast on 80 stitches. Knit 2, purl 2 stitches for 4 inches. Knit plain until sweater measures 25 inches. Knit 28 stitches, bind off 24 stitches for neck, loose. Knit 28 stitches. Knit 7 ridges on each shoulder, cast on 24 stitches. Knit plain for 21 inches. Purl 2, knit 2 stitches for 4 inches. Sew up sides, leaving 9 inches for armholes. Two rows single crochet around neck and 1 row single crochet around armholes.



Washcloth



White knitting-cotton (medium weight); 1 pair Red Cross needles No. 1.

Cast on 70 stitches, knit back and forth plain until cloth is about 10 inches square, and bind off. Sew a loop of tape to one corner.

Service Sock



A service-sock requires three skeins of knitting-yarn for two pairs, with No. 11 steel needles. Cast on 24 stitches on each of 2 needles, and 20 on the 3d. Knit 2 and purl 2 for 3 1/2 inches.

Knit 10, or halfway across the 3d needle, pick up an extra stitch and purl it, keeping this always for the seam-stitch at back of leg, knit plain to end of round. Continue knitting plain and purling the seam stitch for four inches.

Knit to within 3 stitches of the seam-stitch, narrow, knit 1, purl the seam-stitch, knit 1, slip 1, knit 1, draw the slipped stitch over, and knit plain to end of round. Repeat, narrowing as directed every 6th round, 4 times. Now knit without decreasing for one inch.

For the heel: Place 15 stitches each side of the middle or seam-stitch, and knit back and forth, 1 row plain and 1 purl, alternately, for 25 rows, always slipping the 1st stitch. To turn the heel, slip the 1st stitch, knit 15, narrow, knit 1, turn work; slip 1, purl 2, purl 2 together, purl 1, turn, slip 1, knit 3, narrow, knit 1, turn; slip 1, purl 4, purl 2 together, purl 1, turn; slip 1, knit 5, narrow, knit 1, turn; slip 1, purl 6, purl 2 together, purl 1, turn; slip 1, knit 7, narrow, knit 1, turn; slip 1, purl 8, purl 2 together, purl 1, turn; slip 1, knit 9, narrow, knit 1, turn; slip 1, purl 10, purl 2 together, purl 1, turn; slip 1, knit 11, narrow, knit 1, turn; slip 1, purl 12, purl 2 together, purl 1, turn; slip 1, knit 13, narrow, knit 1, turn; slip 1, purl 14, purl 2 together, purl 1, turn; slip 1, knit 14, narrow. Proceed to pick up 17 stitches down side of heel next to needle just finished, knitting each as you pick it up; knit the 30 left on the needle for front of foot, and pick up 17 down other side of heel; then knit on with these half the stitches left at top of heel.

Knit 1 round plain; narrow the 2d round as follows: On 1st side needle knit to within 3 of end, narrow, knit 1; knit across front needle; on side needle knit 1, slip 1, knit 1, pass slipped stitch over, and knit to end. Decrease in this manner every 2d round until there are 15 stitches on each side needle, reducing them to correspond with the front needle, and making 10 narrowings for the instep.

Knit five inches without narrowing, then decrease for the toe in the following manner: Knit to within 3 of end of 1st side needle, narrow, knit 1; on front needle, knit 1, slip and bind as before, knit to within 3 of the end, narrow, knit 1; on other side needle, knit 1, slip and bind, knit plain to the end. Knit 2 rounds plain, and repeat last 3 rounds three times more; then decrease with 1 row plain between three times, and after that decrease every row until there are but 4 stitches on the front needle. Finish off neatly, drawing the toe together and darning in with a worsted-needle.

One-Piece Helmet



One hank of yarn (1/4 pound); Red Cross needles No. 2.

Cast on 56 stitches loosely. Knit plain for 8 inches for front piece, and leave on extra needle. Knit another piece to correspond for back. These pieces must be at least 9 inches wide. Slip the stitches of both pieces on to 3 needles, arranging for last 2 stitches of back piece to be on beginning of 1st needle, with 38 stitches of front piece added (making 40 on 1st needle).

Divide rest of stitches on other 2 needles; 36—36.

Beginning with 1st needle, knit 2, purl 2 for 6 inches. Then on 1st needle knit 2, purl 2 for 18 stitches. Bind off 22 stitches for face opening. (Try to keep same arrangement of stitches on needles for further directions.) Knit 2, purl 2 forward and back on remaining 90 stitches for 1 1/2 inches, always slipping first stitch. Cast on 22 stitches loosely to complete face opening, and knit 2, purl 2 for 2 1/2 inches (adjust stitches by slipping 2 from end of 3d needle to 1st needle, making 42 on 1st needle).

Knit 1 round plain. Knit 2 stitches together, knit 11, knit 2 stitches together, knit 1. Repeat to end of round. Knit 4 rows plain. Then knit 2 stitches together, knit 9, knit 2 together, knit 1. Repeat to end of round. Knit 4 rows plain. Continue in this way, narrowing on every fifth round and reducing number of stitches between narrowed stitches by 2 (as 7, 5, 3, etc.) until you have 28 stitches left on needles. Divide on 2 needles, having 14 on 1st needle and 14 on the other.

Break off yarn, leaving 12-inch end. Thread into worsted-needle and proceed to weave the front and back together as follows:

* Pass worsted-needle through 1st stitch of front knitting-needle as if knitting, and slip stitch off—pass through 2d stitch as if purling—leave stitch on, pass thread through 1st stitch of back needle as if purling, slip stitch off, pass thread through 2d stitch of back needle as if knitting, leave stitch on. Repeat from * until all the stitches are off the needle.

Muffler



Two and one-half skeins of knitting-yarn and one pair amber needles No. 5, or Red Cross needles No. 3 will be required. Cast on 50 stitches, measuring 11 inches, and knit back and forth until the muffler is sixty-eight inches in length.

Hot-Water-Bottle Cover



White knitting-cotton (medium weight); 1 pair Red Cross needles No. 1.

Cast on 56 stitches, knit 2, purl 2 and repeat until the work is 4 inches deep. Then knit back and forth plain for 9 1/2 inches more, or until entire work measures 13 1/2 inches. Next decrease 2 stitches at beginning and 2 stitches at end of each needle until there are sixteen stitches left, and bind off. Make another piece in same manner and sew together. Attach a 20-inch piece of tape to seam at one side of ribbing to tie around neck of bottle.

Helmet Made in Two Parts



One hank of yarn (1/4 pound); 1 pair Red Cross Needles No. 2.

The helmet is made in two parts, which afterward are sewed together.

FRONT OF HELMET.—Cast on 48 stitches (11 inches), knit plain for 25 ribs (6 inches) and knit 2, purl 2 for 35 rows. On the next row the opening for the face is made as follows: Knit 2, purl 2, knit 2, purl 2, knit 2, knit and bind off loosely the next 28 stitches and purl 1, knit 2, purl 2, knit 2, purl 2. Run the stitches before the opening on a spare needle and on the stitches at the other side of opening knit 2, purl 2 for 12 rows. The last row will end at the opening, and at that point cast on 28 stitches to offset those bound off. Begin at the face opening of stitches on spare needle and knit 2, purl 2 for 12 rows. At the end of the 12th row continue all across to the end of other needle, when there should be 48 stitches on needle as at first. Knit 2, purl 2 for 24 rows.

TOP OF HELMET.—Knit 2, narrow (knitting 2 stitches together), knit 14, narrow, knit 14, narrow, knit 12. Purl the entire next row. On the 3d row knit 2, narrow, knit 13, narrow, knit 13, narrow, knit 11. Purl 4th row. On the 5th row knit 2, narrow, knit 12, narrow, knit 12, narrow, knit 10. Purl 6th row. Continue to narrow in the 3 places every plain knitted row with 1 stitch less between narrowings until 9 stitches are left.

BACK OF HELMET.—Work in same manner as for front but omit the face opening. Sew the stitches of upper edges together with joining-stitch. Sew up the side seams, leaving the plain knitting at shoulders open.

Thumbless Mitt or Wristlet



The thumbless mitt or wristlet requires one half hank of knitting-yarn, gray, with No. 2 Red Cross needles or No. 11 or No. 12 steel needles. Nine stitches measure one inch. Cast on 48 stitches and knit 2, purl 2, for 12 inches; bind off and sew up, leaving an opening for the thumb two inches in length, three inches from one end. The ordinary wristlets or pulse-warmers are knitted in the same way, 8 1/2 inches long, and sewed up with no thumb-opening.

Wristlets made in one piece require one half hank of yarn, and 4 bone needles No. 3, or steel needles No. 12. Cast on 52 stitches on 3 needles; 16-16-20. Knit 2, purl 2, for 8 inches. To make opening for thumb, knit 2, purl 2 to end of "Third" needle, turn; knit and purl back to end of "First" needle, always slipping first stitch, turn. Continue knitting back and forth for 2 inches. From this point continue as at first for 4 inches for the hand. Bind off loosely; buttonhole thumb-opening.

Bed-Sock



One hank of yarn (1/4 pound) is required, with Red Cross needles No. 2 or steel needles No. 11 or 12.

Cast 48 stitches on three needles, 16 on each. Knit plain and loosely for 20 inches. Decrease every other stitch by knitting two stitches together until you have 12 stitches on each of two needles opposite each other. Break off yarn and weave stitches together as per directions for finishing one-piece helmet.



Child's Drawers-Leggings Knitted



Materials required are six hanks of Germantown wool, a pair of bone needles No. 4, and a pair of steel needles, No. 15.

Cast on 68 stitches.

1 to 16. Knit 2, purl 2; repeat. This is the double rib.

17. Knit 6 plain, turn; knit back on these 6 stitches, turn.

18. Knit 12, turn; knit back on these 12 stitches.

Continue working in this way, knitting 6 more stitches forward each row and knitting back on the same, until you have 36 stitches on the needle. Knit back on these 36 stitches, turn. This brings 6 ridges at one side of the work. Now knit plain across the entire 68 stitches.

Continue knitting back and forth until you have 34 ridges (not counting the 6 ridges at one side of work); in next row narrow once at each end of row, and continue in this way, narrowing a stitch each end, until you have 50 stitches remaining on the needle.

Do 12 rows of double rib (knit 2, purl 2), then begin the cable-twist of ankle, thus:

1. Knit 7, purl 2, slip 3 stitches on a spare needle, knit 6, then knit the 3 stitches from the spare needle, forming the twist, purl 2, knit 10, purl 2, slip 3 stitches on spare needle, knit 6, knit the 3 stitches from spare needle, purl 2, knit 7, turn.

2. Knit 6, purl 1, knit 2, purl 9, knit 2, purl 1, knit 8, purl 1, knit 2, purl 9, knit 2, purl 1, knit 6, turn.

3. Knit 7, purl 2, knit 9, purl 2, knit 10, purl 2, knit 9, purl 2, knit 7.

Repeat last 2 rows, alternately, for 30 rows, making the twist, as directed in 1st row, every 6th row.

For the instep: Count off or leave 29 stitches; knit back 8 stitches on these 29, and on the 8 stitches work back and forth until you have 8 ridges. Pick up the stitches around edge of instep, and work back and forth along the entire row for 4 ridges; bind off.

Make the other leg in the same way, sew up the seams and join the two by the middle seam.

Around the top work a row of spaces, in which to run the drawstrings, thus:

1. Fasten in, chain 5, * miss 2, a treble in next, chain 2; repeat around, and join to 3d of 5 chain.

2. Miss 1 space, 4 trebles in next, miss 1 space, fasten in next; repeat.

Crochet a cord of the wool and finish the ends with tassels.



A Knitted Hood for Miss Dolly



Using blue Saxony and medium steel needles, cast on 74 stitches; knit plain back and forth until you have 10 single ribs, then bind off 6, knit across to within 6 stitches of the end and bind off these. This is for the front or turnover of the hood.

Next row, knit 1, * over, narrow, knit 1; repeat, forming holes in which to run ribbon.

Now change to white yarn and knit across, adding 6 extra stitches distributed along the front near the top in order to make the back a trifle full, * knit 1 row, purl 1 row and knit 1 row for a triple rib; repeat from * 16 times, always slipping the 1st stitch of each row to give a good selvage.

Bind off 26 stitches on each end of the work; be sure that this is done on the wrong side, and just before knitting the last row of last rib, as the binding off finishes the rib and is essential in keeping all the ribs the same.

Knit the crown on the 16 middle stitches, in the triple ribs described. Widen twice each end of crown needle during 1st 2 ribs. Knit same number of ribs as the front, narrowing once or twice each end of needle near extreme end of crown.

Pick up the stitches for the neck around lower part of crown and fronts, about 18 stitches on each of the latter and alternate loops on the crown; knit across with blue, making a row of holes as on the front; knit 6 or 7 single ribs, and sew neatly to the stitches bound off at lower edge of front.

Sew the crown neatly to front, run ribbon in the spaces made for it and tighten slightly, and finish with ties and bows of ribbon.

By adding extra stitches to the front, and making the crown proportionately larger, these directions will be found to serve admirably for baby's first hood, or as large a hood as wanted.



A Lesson in Crochet

The stitches and terms given herewith are such as are in general use, and were taught the writer by an English teacher of crocheting, herself a professional in the art. In some periodicals and books, the real slip-stitch is omitted, and the single is called slip-stitch; the double is called single, the treble is called double, the double treble is called treble, and so on.

There are different ways of holding the crochet-needle and carrying the thread, and many consider one way as good as another unless, as is usually the case, one's own method is thought a little the best. The following instructions were given by the English teacher in question, and are those commonly accepted: Hold the needle in the right hand very much as you hold a pen when writing, letting the handle extend between the forefinger and thumb, which rest on and hold the needle. Hold nothing but the latter in the right hand, not allowing the fingers of that hand to so much as rest on the work. Hold work with thumb and second finger of left hand, letting the thread pass over the forefinger, slightly raised, or held up from the work, under the second, over the third and under the little finger. These instructions are especially good for using yarns, when it is desirable to keep the work as soft and fluffy as possible.



THE CHAIN. (Figure 1.) Make a loop of thread around the needle, take up the thread and draw through this loop (that is, push the hook under the thread that passes over the forefinger, draw it back, catching the thread, and pull this through the loop on the needle), forming a new stitch or loop, take up the thread and draw through this, and so continue until the chain is of the length required, tightening each loop as drawn through, so that all will be of uniform size and smoothness. After a little practise one does this without thought. When abbreviations are used, that for chain is ch.

THE SLIP-STITCH is properly a close joining stitch: Drop the stitch on the needle, insert hook through the stitch of work to which you wish to join, take up the dropped stitch and pull through, thus making a close fastening. This stitch is sometimes used to "slip" along certain portions of the work, from one to another point, but single crochet is more often employed for this. The abbreviation is sl-st.



SINGLE CROCHET (Figure 2, frequently called slip-stitch, and sometimes mitten-stitch) is made thus: Having a stitch on needle, insert hook in work, take up the thread and draw it through the work and the stitch on the needle at the same time. The abbreviation is s c.



DOUBLE CROCHET. (Figure 3). Having a stitch on needle, insert hook in work, take up thread and draw through, giving you two stitches on the needle; take up thread and draw through the two stitches. The abbreviation is d c. There are many variations of the double-crochet stitch; the slipper-stitch, or ribbed stitch, is formed by taking up the back horizontal loop or vein of each stitch in preceding row. A quite different effect is given when the hook is inserted under both loops.



TREBLE CROCHET. (Figure 4.) Having a stitch on the needle, take up the thread as if to make a stitch, insert hook in work, take up thread and draw through, making three stitches or loops on the needle; * take up thread and draw through two, again and draw through two. The abbreviation of treble crochet, is t c. It will be noted that the single crochet has one "draw," the double two, and the treble three, from which these stitches take their names.



HALF-TREBLE OR SHORT-TREBLE CROCHET. Like treble to *; then take up thread and draw through all three stitches at once.



DOUBLE-TREBLE CROCHET. (Figure 6.) Having a stitch on the needle, take up the thread twice, or put it twice over the needle, insert hook in work, take up thread and draw through, making four stitches to be worked off; (take up thread and draw through two) three times. The abbreviation of double-treble crochet is d t c.



TRIPLE-TREBLE CROCHET. (Figure 7.) Take up thread three times, insert hook in work, take up thread and draw through, making five stitches on needle; work these off two at a time, as in double treble. The abbreviation is t t c.

One sometimes has occasion to use other extra-long stitches, such as quadruple crochet (over four times before insertion of hook in work), quintuple crochet (over five times), and so on, which are worked off two at a time, exactly as in treble or double treble. In turning, one chain-stitch corresponds to a double, two chain-stitches to a half or short treble, three chain to a treble, four to a double treble, five to a triple treble, and so on, adding one chain for each extra "draw."

PARENTHESES () AND ASTERISKS OR STARS * * are used to prevent the necessity of repetition and save space. They indicate repeats of like directions. Thus: (Chain 3, miss 3, 1 treble in next) three times is equivalent to chain 3, miss 3, 1 treble in next, chain 3, miss 3, 1 treble in next, chain 3, miss 3, 1 treble in next; or to * chain 3, miss 3, 1 treble in next, repeat from * twice.

The worker should be careful in the selection of a hook. It should be well made and smooth, and of a size to carry the wool smoothly, without catching in and roughening it. If too large, on the other hand, the work is apt to be sleazy. Needles that have been used for some time work more easily than new ones. If all makes of crochet-needles were numbered in the same way the size might be easily designated; but it happens that no two manufacturers use like numbers for the same sizes, hence the rule given is the best that can be.



Crocheted Jacket



One color or two may be used for making this pretty jacket, which is extremely modish, and very comfortable for the cool days and evenings sure to be experienced during summer outings. Six skeins of fourfold Germantown will be sufficient; or four skeins of one color for the body and two of white for the border, if made in two colors.

Make a chain of 54 stitches, turn.

1. Miss 3, a double in next, * chain 1, miss 1, 1 double in next; repeat from * across, making 26 doubles; turn.

2. Chain 2, a double under 1 chain, * chain 1, a double under next 1 chain; repeat across, turn.

Repeat 2d row until you have completed a strip 22 inches long, for the back, bringing the work to the shoulder.

Now work back and forth for one shoulder and front, repeating 2d row until you have made 9 doubles; turn, chain 2, and repeat until you have made 4 rows.

In the next row widen by making 2 doubles, 1 chain between, in center of row, finishing row as usual; widen in the center of every 8th row until you have 15 doubles in the row, then continue without widening until the front is of the same length as the back.

Leave 8 doubles for back of neck and on the remaining 9 doubles work the other front to correspond.

For the border: Commence (with the border-color, if two colors are used) at corner of left front, make a treble under 1 chain (chain 3 for 1st treble), * chain 1, a treble under next 1 chain; repeat from * all around, putting 2 trebles with 1 chain between in same stitch at corners, and on the shoulders at the neck to shape the collar.

Make another row in the same way, then work in seed-stitch as you did the body of the jacket (a double under 1 chain, chain 1) for 8 rows, widening the same stitches at corners each time.

Fold the garment at the shoulders, bringing fronts and back together. Commencing in 10th chain from bottom of front and back, work in the usual way for 25 stitches, a double under each chain. Work from underarm around the armscye until the sleeve is 12 inches in length, or as long as desired, then make the 2 rows of spaces, in treble crochet, as before and finish with 7 rows of seed-stitch, same as body of jacket.

For the picot edge: Two doubles in 2 stitches, chain 3 for a picot; repeat.

The stitch given is very simple and pretty, but any other fancy stitch may be used that is liked. Among others may be named Lancaster-stitch, made as follows: Having a chain of an even number of stitches, turn.

1. Miss 1st stitch, a double in each remaining stitch, turn.

2. Chain 3, wool over, draw a loop through 1st stitch, over, draw a loop through next stitch, over, draw a loop through same stitch, over, draw a loop through next stitch, over, draw through all the loops on needle, * chain 4, a double in 1st stitch of the chain just made, which closes or joins the cluster of loops, over, draw a loop through same stitch with last loop of preceding cluster, over, draw a loop through next stitch, over, draw a loop through same stitch, over, draw a loop through next stitch, over, draw through all the loops on needle, and repeat from *; turn.

3. A double in 1st space, double around the thread between 4 chain and cluster; repeat, ending with a double in top of 3 chain with which last row started. Repeat 2d and 3d rows for the pattern.

The bird's-eye-stitch is simple and pleasing: Having a chain of desired length, turn.

1. Miss 1, a double in each stitch of chain, turn.

2. A double in double, taking front loop of stitch in last row, a double in next double, taking back loop; repeat to end, and repeat 2d row.

Still another pretty stitch, easily adjusted to any garment, is as follows: Chain a number of stitches divisible by 3, turn.

1. Miss 1, a double in each remaining stitch of chain, turn.

2. Chain 1, a double in each double of last row, turn.

3. Chain 1, a double in each of 2 doubles, * wool over, insert hook in 3d stitch of 1st row, take up wool and draw through, (over, draw through 2 stitches) twice, miss 1, a double in each of next 2 doubles; repeat from * to end of row, turn.

4. Same as 2d row.

5. Chain 1, a double in each of 1st 2 doubles, * wool over and make a treble as before, inserting the hook under the treble of 3d row, miss 1, a double in each of 2 stitches; repeat from * to end, turn. Repeat 4th and 5th rows.

And another still: Make a chain of length required, turn.

1. Miss 3, a treble in next stitch, * miss 1, 2 trebles in next stitch, repeat to end of row, turn.

2. Chain 3, 2 trebles between each group of 2 trebles in last row; repeat. Repeat 2d row.



Tam-o'-Shanter in Double Crochet



For the model were used one skein of electric-blue knitting-worsted and a ball of gray Angora wool, with a hook large enough to carry the yarn easily.

Make a chain of 3 stitches, join.

1. Seven doubles in ring.

2. Two doubles in each double, taking both veins of stitch.

3. A double in double, 2 in next; repeat.

4. A double in each of 2 doubles, 2 in next; repeat.

5. A double in each of 3 doubles, 2 in next; repeat.

Continue in this way, adding 1 double between widenings each row, until you have 30 doubles in each section—between widenings—or more, if a larger crown is desired.

33. A double in each of 7 doubles, miss 1; repeat.

34. A double in each of 6 doubles, miss 1; repeat.

35. A double in each of 2 doubles, miss 1; repeat.

36 to 45. A double in each stitch.

46, 47. With gray Angora wool, make a double in each stitch and fasten off the last row neatly.

Cover a large, flat button-mold with the blue wool: Make a chain of 3 stitches, turn, and in 2d stitch of chain make 8 doubles; make 2 doubles in each of 8 doubles, working in both veins of stitch; then make 1 double in 1st stitch, 2 in next, and repeat. Continue to work around and around, widening to keep the work flat, until you have a circle which will cover the button-mold, say 6 rounds; then work once around without widening, slip in the mold, * miss 1, a double in next, and repeat until the cover is closed.

For the edge of the button and the cord around top of band either the double chain may be made, an ordinary chain filled with double crochet, or—better still—the cord may be knotted by what is called the "fool's delight" method—which seems a very sensible method, indeed: Take a length of the Angora wool six times as long as the cord is wanted to be; indeed, it will be better to start with a longer piece, for fear it may "take up" more rapidly than anticipated. Make a slip or half knot at one end of the yarn, pass the other end down through this to form a loop, then tie the ends of the yarn together. Hold this knot between thumb and forefinger of one hand (say the right), with the yarn which pulls through the half knot under the same hand, and the loop which was formed held on the forefinger, holding the yarn which does not pull in the left hand; pass the forefinger of left hand through the loop on right forefinger from front to back, catch up and draw through the non-pulling or left-hand thread—exactly as you would make a chain-stitch in crochet—transfer the knot which ties the two ends together to thumb and forefinger of left hand, keeping the loop over forefinger, and draw up the pulling yarn, or that passed originally through the half knot. Now the position of the loop, pulling yarn and knot is exactly the same in the left hand as formerly in the right. Continue by passing forefinger of right hand through the loop on left forefinger, catching up the non-pulling thread and drawing it through to form the new loop (on right forefinger again), transfer the knot from left hand to right, and pull up, repeating the process from beginning. This is really a sort of double chain, and when one has learned to make it evenly and well—as may be done with a little practise—it will be found superior for bags, lingerie, and many other articles requiring a drawstring or a cord.

Sew this cord evenly around button and top of band, and the cap is completed.



Ladies' Sleeveless Jacket or Hug-Me-Tight



Use Germantown worsted, white or any desired color, with a hook large enough to carry the yarn smoothly. Commence with a chain of 140 stitches, turn.

1. Miss 3, 1 treble in each of 68 stitches following, shell of 3 trebles, 2 chain and 3 trebles in next stitch, to widen for center of back, a treble in each remaining stitch, turn.

2. Chain 3 for 1st treble, a treble in each treble, including the 3 trebles of shell, up to the 2 chain, make a shell as before under 2 chain, then a treble in each following to the end, turn. Work always in back vein of stitch to produce the ribbed or striped effect.

3 to 23. Same as 2d row. The jacket is now ready for joining.

Commencing at the point in center of back, count 26 stitches, then fold over and, starting from the other end of the same row, crochet the two sides together for 25 stitches, taking a stitch from each side. This will leave about 65 stitches for armscye.

For the border:

1. Shell of 6 trebles in a stitch, miss 2, a treble in next, miss 2; repeat. Commence with 3 chain for 1st treble of 1st shell, and join to that.

2. Shell of 6 trebles between 3d and 4th trebles of shell in previous row, and treble in treble; repeat.

3. Chain 4, fasten back in 1st stitch for a picot, a double between 2 trebles, repeat, making 5 picots around the shell, a double in single treble; repeat.

Work around the armscye in same way.



Child's Coat Sweater



Use Germantown wool, cream-white or any color desired, and bone hook size 4, or a hook large enough to carry the wool easily. The sweater is crocheted in the length in two parts, and is joined in center of back.

Make a chain of 160 stitches, turn.

1. A double in each stitch of chain, chain 1, turn.

2. A double in each double, working in back vein of stitch to form a rib.

3. Make star-stitches along the rib, thus: Chain 3, draw a loop through 2d and 3d stitches of chain, counting from hook, and a loop through each of 2 doubles; take up wool and draw through the 5 stitches on needle, chain 1 to close the star, draw a loop through eye of star just made (under the 1 chain), another through the back part of last perpendicular loop of the same star, and a loop through each of 2 doubles, close the star by working off all the loops, chain 1, and repeat to end of row, turn.

Make another rib of doubles by working across twice, then a row of star-stitches, and continue until you have 4 rows of stars and 5 ribs; on next row work 39 stars, then a rib, and continue until you have 3 rows of 39 star-stitches each. Work a row of doubles, break and fasten the wool securely. Bear in mind that the star-stitches must be all worked on the right side; the 1st row will come so, but the 2d will not unless the wool is broken off at the end of 2d rib and fastened in at other end again; then chain 3, and proceed with the row.

Beginning at the neck-end of the front strip, leave the 1st 6 stitches (equal to 3 stars) and work to end of row in star-stitch; make a rib as directed. Work 2 more rows of stars, with the ribs alternating, leaving 1 star less at the top or neck-end each time.

Work the other half to correspond, then join in center of the back with single crochet, putting hook through a loop of each part. If carefully done the joining will not be discernible. Join under arms, also, leaving the opening for armholes.

For the border: Work 10 rows of double crochet, a double in each stitch, around the entire garment, fronts, bottom and neck, widening at each of the lower corners in each row to form the miter. Or, if preferred, work around neck and down fronts first, completing the border; then work around the bottom and across the front border. The widening for miter is neater. The buttonholes are made in the 5th row of front; chain 5, miss 5, and repeat, making as many openings as desired, at equal distances. In working back, next row, make also a double in each stitch of 5 chain.

For the sleeve: Chain 80 stitches, with 1 to turn, work a rib of doubles on the chain, then 40 star-stitches. Repeat until there are 10 rows of star-stitch and 11 ribs, taking care, as before, that the stars are worked on the right side always. Join the sleeve-seam on the wrong side with single crochet, as you did the back.

For the cuff: Work 12 rounds of double crochet, 1 double in each stitch and turn back. Sew the sleeves into the armholes, and sew on buttons of a size appropriate to the garment and corresponding with the buttonholes.

This sweater may be very easily enlarged to any desired size by starting with a longer chain and making more rows of star-stitch and ribs to keep the proportion. The combination of stitches is a most attractive one.



Child's Jacket



Materials required are three skeins of cream-white Saxony and one skein of blue or pink, with a bone hook of suitable size to carry the yarn smoothly.

Make a chain of 78 stitches.

1. On the chain make 8 stars, widen, (1 star, widen, 9 stars, widen) twice, 1 star, widen, 8 stars. Break and fasten wool, and fasten in again at beginning of row so as to have all stars made on the right side. Or, one can work back with a row of doubles to beginning of 1st row.

2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8. Same as 1st row, except that you widen only every other row, and always exactly in the center. Keep 8 stars on each front, thus constantly increasing the upper portion of the sleeve, or gore between 1st and 2d and 4th and 5th widenings.

9. Make 8 stars, chain 22 for armhole, fasten in 1st star on the back, continue the stars across the back, chain 22, and make 8 stars across front again.

10. Same as preceding row, making 11 stars on chain under each arm.

11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20. Same as 10th row, widening only in center of back every other row, as at first. This completes the body of the jacket.

21. Commencing the border, fasten in the colored wool at left front corner of neck, and make 21 stars down the front. At the corner make 2 stars as if to widen, in order to turn the corner neatly, and continue all the way around to top of right front, not widening at all in the back of border, but making 2 stars to turn the corner as at first.

22. Stars all around, of color.

23. Fasten in the white wool at top of left front, chain 3, then make 2 trebles in the eye of each star all around, with 4 trebles in eye of star at corners, so as to make the work lie smoothly.

24. With color, fasten in at top of left front, chain 3, and make 2 trebles between each 2 trebles of last row, with 4 at corners.

25. Same as 24th row, with white wool.

26. Across top of neck make spaces of trebles, separated by 2 chain, in which to run cord or ribbon.

27. Also with white, make 2 trebles in every space.

28. With color, make 2 trebles between each group of last row.

29. Like 28th row, with white. This completes the collar.

30. Fasten color at top of left front, * chain 4, fasten in space between trebles, repeat from * around the jacket, collar and all; fasten off neatly.

For the sleeve:

1. Fasten wool where you started the underarm chain, make the required number of stars (not widening) across shoulder, and 9 stars on the chain under the arm.

2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11. Same as 1st row, making star over star of previous row, and joining underneath the arm.

12. With color, work the cuff in star-stitch, only omit taking the stitch under the back loop of star in last row, and take a loop through each of 2 eyes of stars instead, thus drawing in the sleeve, and making only 12 stars in the round.

13. With the color, make star in star.

14. Using white wool, make 2 trebles in eye of each star.

15, 16, 17. Same as 28th, 29th and 30th rows of border.

This makes a dainty, soft little garment. If one likes, treble stitch may be alternated with star-stitch, on the return rows; that is, after making a row of stars, instead of breaking the wool, turn, chain 3, and make trebles across, or the trebles may be crossed to give a more fancy effect, making a treble in 2d stitch, then a treble back in preceding stitch.

Run ribbon matching the colored wool, or cord and tassels made of both white and color, in the spaces around the neck.



Girl's Jacket



Materials required are 12 skeins of gray Germantown yarn and 1 skein of blue. Make a chain of 52 stitches.

1. A double in 8th stitch of chain, * chain 3, miss 3, 1 double in next; repeat from * 10 times, making 12 loops in all, turn.

2. Chain 4, 3 trebles in 1st loop, * chain 1, 3 trebles in next loop; repeat from * across the row, ending with 4 trebles, turn.

3. Chain 4, a double under 1 chain, * chain 3, a double under next; repeat to end of row.

Repeat 2d and 3d rows 23 times, making 24 rows of blocks in all, alternating with rows of loops. Divide the width into three parts, 4 blocks for back of neck and 4 for each front. Work same as 3d row until you have made 4 blocks, the last block of 4 trebles, turn and work back same as 3d row. Repeat these 2 rows twice more; in next row, to widen, make 6 trebles under 4th loop, chain 4, turn, miss 3 of 6 trebles, a double between next 2, chain 3, fasten under 1 chain, and continue across. The next row will consist of 5 blocks, and there are 20 rows of 5 blocks each, in all, making the same length of back. Make the other front in exactly the same way.

For the border:

1. Fasten in at corner of neck (at end of 1st row of 5 blocks), work in blocks down the front, across the bottom, putting 3 extra trebles at each corner to turn smoothly, up over shoulder and down back, and so on around to opposite corner, omitting the stitch between blocks.

2. Fasten blue yarn at right front and work a row of loops as described, fastening the chains between groups of 3 trebles.

Make 3 more rows of blocks, same color as body of jacket, with always the 3 extra trebles (6 in all) at corners to turn, and following the 2d and 3d rows with the row of loops in blue.

For the sleeve: Fold the jacket evenly and fasten yarn at the back of jacket, at the desired width for sleeve—9 blocks from top of shoulder, in the model; chain 9, fasten to front, work around armhole with a row of loops (gray), making 21 loops in all, 3 under arm, chain 3, 2 trebles under 1st loop, chain 1, 3 trebles under next loop; repeat around, join, and repeat the rows of loops and blocks to required length; the model has 25 rows of blocks, ending with the row of loops.

For the cuff: Leave 7 blocks on top of sleeve, fasten in 8th loop (the 3d from center loop at top of sleeve), work around as usual to 3d loop from center on other side, turn, make a row of loops, then a row of blocks. Fasten the blue yarn to sleeve, and work around cuff with loops; make a row of blocks with 6 trebles at corners to turn, and continue to match border of jacket, making 4 rows of blocks and 3 of blue chain-loops.

1  2     Next Part
Home - Random Browse