HotFreeBooks.com
Stevenson Memorial Cook Book
Author: Various
1  2  3  4     Next Part
Home - Random Browse

Transcriber's Notes: To show the original charm of this book, it was transcribed exactly as printed. All spelling errors were retained. The reader, if interested, may check this against the original images which were included in the HTML edition of this text.

These retained errors include such things as "lawyer" for "layer," "maringue" for "meringue," varied spellings of "ramekin," and the contributors names.



STEVENSON MEMORIAL

COOK BOOK



PUBLISHED BY

Sarah Hackett Stevenson Memorial Lodging House Association ENDORSED BY THE CHICAGO ASSOCIATION COMMERCE SUBSCRIPTIONS INVESTIGATING COMMITTEE 2412 Prairie Avenue CHICAGO



INDEX

Page APPETIZERS 7 BEVERAGES 159 BREAD 107 CAKES 117 CANDIES 181 CHEESE DISHES 177 COOKIES 131 DESSERTS 83 EGG DISHES 171 FILLINGS AND ICINGS 127 FISH 23 HOUSEHOLD HINTS 193 MEATS AND FOWL 35 PICKLES 141 PIES 77 PRESERVES 149 FROZEN DISHES 99 PUDDINGS 89 SALADS 67 SANDWICHES 165 SAUCES 51 SHELL FISH 29 SOUPS 15 TIME REQUIRED 192 VEGETABLES 55 WEIGHTS AND MEASURES 191

* * * * *

Copyright, 1919 by Sarah Hackett Stevenson Memorial Lodging House Association



DEDICATED —TO— SARAH HACKETT STEVENSON Whose life was devoted to Service for Humanity

Compiled by

MRS. WILLIAM D. HURLBUT

Assisted by

THE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE

MRS. HERBERT D. SHELDON MRS. CARL S. JUNGE MRS. A. DONALD CAMPBELL MRS. SARAH A. GRAHAM MRS. A. C. ALLEN MRS. GEORGE K. SPOOR MRS. WM. S. TASKER MRS. WM. IRVING CLOCK MRS. EDWARD D. GOTCHY

TRUSTEES

HON. WM. B. MCKINLEY, M. C. HON. HENRY HORNER Judge of Probate Court (Ex-officio) MRS. W. H. WINSLOW President Chicago Woman's Club (Ex-officio) MRS. GEORGE WATKINS MRS. GEORGE S. BLAKESLEE MRS. THOMAS D. MCMICKEN MRS. EDWARD L. PHELPS MRS. HERMANN VANDER PLOEG MRS. A. C. ALLEN MRS. HERBERT D. SHELDON



FOREWORD

During the year 1893 on the streets of Chicago were hundreds of women who had been thrown out of employment. The genuine helplessness and hopelessness of these women appealed strongly to the generous heart of a wonderful woman, Dr. Sarah Hackett Stevenson, one time president of the Chicago Woman's Club. She went before this club and stated that there was no place in this great city where a woman without funds could find shelter—a woman who would work if given an opportunity. She demanded in the name of humanity that this, her club, do something at once to relieve the situation.

Her plea had its effect, and money was subscribed for beginning work. Other clubs responded to the call for help and contributed both furnishings and funds. And what was called the Woman's Model Lodging House was opened to the public.

No questions were asked of those who came for shelter—the past was not the thing to be dealt with—only the present and future. A charge of 15 cents a night was made, and if they were without money work was given them and they were paid for it—they, in turn, paying for their lodging. It was the principle of the organization that the actual handling of this money helped to preserve self-respect and that they might not feel themselves objects of charity. This principle has held through the years and no woman or child is turned from the door as long as there is a place to rest.

Hon. William B. McKinley of Champaign, Ill., gave as a memorial to Dr. Stevenson the present home at 2412 Prairie avenue, which will accommodate sixty women and about fifty children. The organization has become one of the strongest in the city—a delegated body of eighty-two members who represent women's organizations of Cook County. For the last few years the work has grown and broadened, until almost every trouble and sorrow that can come to women and children is brought to this door.

The woman who is on the downward path of years, when it is so hard to find employment, her little money gone, often weakened both mentally and physically from lack of nourishment and worry—she might be any one's mother—if not able to work for her lodging, is supplied from the loan fund. Often she can return the small amount and she does not feel that she has received charity, but that the hand of a friend has grasped hers, and her faith in humanity is restored. The young girl who is alone and without money is safe from the cheap rooming houses of the city. The mother with her little family, who has been left, by desertion or death, without the father's protection comes to this home and remains until she can gather up the thread of existence once more. Often she is saved from placing her children in institutions or giving them for adoption. An average of 105 women and children are cared for in the Lodging House each day.

As time brought the need of better facilities for the care of the children, the generous friend of the Institution, Wm. B. McKinley, gave the building at 2408 Prairie avenue for Nursery purposes. Here the children are cared for during the day, while the mother is seeking employment, or otherwise adjusting her affairs.

A limited number of neighborhood children are also cared for. A trained nurse and kindergartner are employed. Twenty-four hour feedings for bottle babies are furnished so that the little ones diet may not be disturbed. In this department 60 children are given daily care. The mother has charge of her family at night. Every effort is made by this organization to keep the mother and her children together. We believe that separation should be only after every other method has failed.

A visit to the Stevenson Memorial will interest you and you are most welcome at all times.

MRS. HERBERT D. SHELDON, President.



APPETIZERS

"Nor love thy life, nor hate, but while thou livest, live well."

CHEESE TOAST CANAPE

Mrs. C. A. Carscadin

Toast small squares or rounds of bread on one side; on the other side grate cheese and set in oven until cheese is melted; add paprika.

CHEESE CANAPES

Mrs. E. S. Smith

Cut bread in quarter-inch slices. Spread lightly with French mustard. Sprinkle with grated cheese and finely chopped olives. Brown slightly in oven.

SARDINE AND EGG CANAPE

Mrs. C. A. Carscadin

Toast small pieces of bread; cover with a paste made of sardines and a little lemon juice, and top with the yolks of hard boiled egg put through the ricer.

SARDINE CANAPE

Mrs. J. A. Kaerwer

Two cans small sardines; one teaspoonful catsup; one teaspoonful lemon juice; a dash of tabasco sauce. Place slice of bread on leaf of lettuce then lay two small sardines across with chopped eggs, and last add catsup, lemon juice and tabasco sauce.

SARDINE CANAPE

Mrs. J. A. Kaerwer

Two cans of sardines boned; two tablespoonfuls chopped pickled beets; mix thoroughly and spread on slices of bread; sprinkle chopped eggs over same and serve.

SARDINE CANAPE

Mrs. A. D. Campbell

Mash sardines with silver fork, after removing tails and loose skin. Cover with juice of one-half lemon. Spread on thin slices of bread, cut either round or oblong. Cover with grated cheese and toast until cheese melts. Serve hot.

SALMON AND TOMATO CANAPE

Mrs. C. A. Carscadin

On a small piece of toast put a paste of salmon, and on this a slice of ripe tomato with mayonnaise.

LOBSTER CANAPE

Mrs. Louis Geyler

Chop one-half cup of lobster meat fine and mix thoroughly with the white of two hard boiled eggs which has been pressed through a ricer. Season with salt, pepper, one teaspoonful mustard and moisten with thick mayonnaise. Saute circular pieces of bread until brown, then spread with the mixture. Sprinkle over the top a thin layer of hard boiled yolks and lobster pressed through the ricer.

CANAPES

Mrs. Louis Geyler

Dip edges of toast in egg, then in finely minced parsley or chervil; spread with anchovy butter and garnish with cold boiled eggs, olives and capers; or

On the same foundation use tartar sauce, boned anchovies curled around edge and garnish with a stuffed olive or gherkin fan; a gherkin fan is made by cutting it in thin slices, not quite through, and putting the ends together; or

Cover toast with tomato slices, curl anchovy in center and season with lemon, onion juice and paprika; or

Garnish with powdered egg yolk and diced whites; or

Spread toast with anchovy butter, cover with mayonnaise mixed with chili sauce.

MUSHROOM CANAPE (Hot)

Miss Agnes Sieber

Cook fresh mushrooms in butter, place on rounds of toast, spread with chervil or parsley butter; pipe a mound of beaten egg white, seasoned with salt and pepper, on each mushroom and place in hot oven until maringue is brown.

PRUNE AND BACON CANAPE (Hot)

Miss Agnes Sieber

Remove stones from large prunes and olives; stuff olives with capers and bits of anchovy; put them in the prunes, wrap each prune with bacon and tie with a thread. Place in hot oven until bacon is crisp, remove thread and place on disks of toast spread with Parmesan butter.

TONGUE CANAPE

Mrs. F. A. Sieber

Spread toast with mustard cream, garnish with tiny strips of tongue, put a lozenge of white meat of chicken in center, on this put a slice of truffle, both marinated in French dressing.

CANAPE A LA VANDERBILT

Mrs. Paul Klein-exel.

Slice of tomatoes on lettuce; combination of crabmeat, celery and pearl onions. Serve with oil mayonnaise.

TUNNYFISH CANAPE

Mrs. F. A. Sieber

Spread toast with horseradish butter, lay on strips of tunnyfish and garnish with slices of gherkin.

TOMATO CANAPE

Elizabeth Jennings

Lightly toast circles of bread, cut out with biscuit cutter, one-half inch thick. Cover each circle with a slice of tomato. Sprinkle with salt and pepper. Cover tomato with layer of caviar, garnishing edge with finely cut white of hard boiled egg. Instead of caviar, the tiny white onions (bottled) or yolk of egg finely chopped may be substituted. Serve on plate with fancy paper doily.

ANCHOVY PASTE CANAPE

Mrs. Paul Klein-exel.

Slice of toast, cut shape of tomato; spread with anchovy paste; topped with tomato slice, and yellow American cheese, browned and melted in oven. Toast only one side of bread.

SARDINOLA CANAPE

Mrs. Frederick T. Hoyt

Cut rounds of fresh bread and toast lightly in oven. Cover with Sardinola paste, then sprinkle grated cheese over top, then brown slightly and serve while hot.

CHICKEN, HAM OR TONGUE CANAPES

Mrs. Louis Geyler

Spread toast with mustard butter, cover with minced chicken and garnish with olives, pickles, capers and pearl onions; or

Border edge of toast with minced tongue or ham, fill center with chicken mixed with mayonnaise and garnish with minced truffles.

ANCHOVIES AND TOMATOES

Cover anchovies with lemon juice and paprika; in an hour or two place them on tomato slices sprinkled with pulverized egg yolk and garnish with the egg white cut in strips.

ARTICHOKE FONDS OR CELERY CUPS

Parboil six artichokes, or celery hearts cut in cups, in salted acidulated water, cool and marinate in French dressing; fill cups with diced or shredded mixed vegetables and top with mayonnaise; or

Coat the cups with aspic and fill with caviar.

Canned artichokes which are already cooked may be used.

CUCUMBER CROWNS

Cut peeled cucumbers into inch lengths, scoop out centers, leaving a little at the bottom, fill with lobster or shrimp cream and garnish edge with anchovies, mixed olives, capers or pimentoes; or

Fill with caviar mixed with lemon juice and garnish with pearl onions and minced cress.

SHRIMPS AND EGGS

Cut hard boiled eggs in halves, remove yolks and fill with shredded shrimps mixed with mayonnaise; garnish with powdered yolks and serve on lettuce leaves.

EASTER APPETIZER

Mrs. A. J. Atwater

Hard boil as many eggs as you have services; peel and cut the whites to represent baskets, carefully scoop out the yolks and fill the baskets with caviar. Toast rounds of bread, cover with the yolks which have been put through ricer, stand a basket in the center of each and serve with a thin slice of lemon.

SWEETBREAD CANAPE

Mrs. Louis Geyler

Spread brown bread toast with creamed butter mixed with pate de foie gras; cover with cooked sweetbreads mixed with cucumber, pepper, gras and mayonnaise. Garnish with sweet red peppers.

CANAPE

Mrs. W. D. Hurlbut

Spread rounds of toast with liver sausage; garnish with yolks of hard boiled egg put through ricer; in the center place a spoonful of minced stuffed olives.

SARDINE CANAPE

Mrs. J. G. Sherer

Spread rounds of toast with mayonnaise; cover with a slice of tomato; mince sardines with yolk of a hard boiled egg and finely chopped stuffed olives; cover the tomato with this mixture and place a spoonful of mayonnaise on top.

CRAB FLAKE CANAPE

Mrs. J. G. Sherer

Rounds of bread toasted on one side; spread untoasted side with a mixture of butter and Parmesan cheese. To a small quantity of cream sauce, add one cup crab flakes and heat. Put mounds of crab flakes on the buttered toast and put under blaze long enough to brown slightly.

SAUSAGE AND OLIVE CANAPE

Mrs. P. D. Swigart

Toast rounds of bread on one side; spread the untoasted side with mayonnaise, and on this lay a slice of summer sausage as thin as it can be cut; top with minced olive and pimento in mayonnaise.

OLIVE AND NUT CANAPE

Mrs. H. Clay Calhoun

To one cup minced stuffed olives add one-half cup minced nut meats and one-half cup oil mayonnaise; mix well and spread on toasted bread cut in any shape you want. Garnish with a little mound of mayonnaise sprinkled with paprika.

FRUIT COCKTAIL

Mrs. W. D. Hurlbut

Shred some pineapple; add grape fruit pulp and seeded white grapes; cover with hot sugar and water syrup and let stand until cold; flavor with sherry and serve in cocktail glasses that have been chilled by filling with ice an hour before time to serve.

FRUIT COCKTAIL

Mrs. A. Donald Campbell

Scoop out rounds of watermelon and cantaloupe, thoroughly chilled; put in glasses, sprinkle with pulverized sugar and pour over each two tablespoonfuls ice cold ginger ale. Garnish with cherry.

STRAWBERRY COCKTAIL

Mrs. H. W. Keil

Select large ripe berries, and if very sandy, wash them. Remove hulls and cut them in halves lengthwise; fill glasses with berries and pour over them a dressing made by mixing one cup of water and two tablespoonfuls sugar, let boil three minutes; cool and add one-half cup claret; let this dressing be ice cold when poured over the berries. Serve.

CHERRY COCKTAIL

Mrs. J. G. Sherer

Select the big California cherries; take out the stones and insert in their places walnut, almond or hazel nut meats. Half fill the glasses with a cold syrup made of fruit juice and a little sugar.

ORANGE COCKTAIL

Mrs. H. F. Vehmeyer

Remove the skin from the orange sections, place in a chilled cocktail glass and pour over a syrup made of sweetened orange juice and a little sherry. Decorate with sugar coated mint sprays.

TOMATO COCKTAIL

Mrs. Magda West

Select uniform sized tomatoes; cut in halves lengthwise. In each glass place a small, crisp leaf of head lettuce; put one-half of a tomato on each and half fill the glass with cocktail sauce.

SHRIMP COCKTAIL

Mrs. A. M. Cameron

Boil green shrimp until tender, about twenty-five minutes. Peel and break in halves, if large; dice celery and olives with the shrimp, mix well and cover with a cocktail sauce.

SARDINE COCKTAIL

Mrs. W. D. Hurlbut

Drain sardines from oil in box; remove skin, tail and bones; break into small pieces; mince celery and mix with it; put in cocktail glass and cover with sauce made of one-half cup catsup, juice of one lemon; tablespoonful horseradish and a little salt.

CRABMEAT COCKTAIL

Mrs. C. A. Carscadin

Two tablespoonfuls crabmeat to each person. To one cup tomato catsup add juice of one lemon, two tablespoonfuls grated horseradish thinned with vinegar; a few drops of tabasco sauce and just before serving, a tablespoonful cracked ice.

CRAB FLAKE COCKTAIL

Mrs. J. G. Sherer

To one cup of Japanese crab flakes mince one stalk of celery, one teaspoonful capers and mix well. Fill green pepper cases with the mixture and cover with two tablespoonfuls cocktail sauce.

CLAM COCKTAIL SAUCE

Three tablespoonfuls of tomato, or mushroom catsup; three tablespoonfuls lemon juice; one tablespoonful horseradish; a few drops tabasco; salt and paprika. Stir well and allow about two tablespoonfuls of the sauce for each cocktail.

COCKTAIL SAUCE

Mix well four tablespoonfuls tomato catsup; one of vinegar; two of lemon juice; one of grated horseradish; one of Worcestershire sauce; one teaspoonful salt and a few drops of tabasco. Have very cold when poured over cocktails.

COCKTAIL SAUCE

Mrs. W. L. Gregson

One tablespoonful freshly grated horseradish; one tablespoonful vinegar; half a teaspoonful tabasco sauce; two tablespoonfuls lemon juice; one tablespoonful chili sauce; half a teaspoonful Worcestershire sauce. Mix and let stand on ice until ready to serve.

COCKTAIL SAUCE

Two tablespoonfuls each tomato catsup and sherry wine; one tablespoonful lemon juice; a few drops tabasco sauce; half a teaspoonful minced chives and a little salt. Have thoroughly chilled before pouring over cocktail.

COCKTAIL SAUCE

Rub a bowl with a clove of garlic; two tablespoonfuls tomato catsup; one tablespoonful grated horseradish; one tablespoonful mushroom catsup; one teaspoonful lemon juice; one teaspoonful finely chopped chives; a few drops of tabasco sauce, salt and pepper.



SOUPS

All human history attests: That happiness for man—the hungry sinner— Since Eve ate apples—much depends on dinner. —BYRON.

CREAM OF ASPARAGUS

Mrs. K. T. Cary

Cook one bunch of asparagus twenty minutes, drain and reserve tops; add two cups of stock and one slice of onion minced; boil thirty minutes. Rub through sieve and thicken with two tablespoonfuls butter and two tablespoonfuls of flour rubbed together. Add salt, pepper, two cups milk and the tips.

CREAM OF BEAN SOUP

Mrs. E. D. Kenfield

Put one quart of milk to heat. While it is heating, put the cooked beans through colander. Blend one tablespoonful butter with one of flour; pour over this the hot milk. Season with salt and pepper, stir until smooth, and then add the beans. Pea or asparagus soup can be made in the same way.

CREAM OF CABBAGE

Cut up one small head of cabbage and boil until quite tender. Put it through a colander, add one quart of milk, salt and pepper and thicken with two tablespoonfuls each of butter and flour rubbed together.

CREAM OF CELERY

Mrs. W. D. Hurlbut

Cut four heads celery into small pieces and boil it in three pints of water with one-fourth pound of lean ham minced; simmer gently for an hour. Strain through a sieve and return to the pan adding one quart of milk, salt and pepper; thicken with two tablespoonfuls of butter and two tablespoonfuls of flour rubbed to a paste. Serve with whipped cream on top.

CREAM OF CORN

Mrs. A. Donald Campbell

Put one can of corn on to simmer with one pint of water and one small onion sliced; cook thirty minutes. Strain, return to the pan, adding one quart of milk, salt and pepper and thicken with two tablespoonfuls of flour and butter. Serve hot with a spoonful of whipped cream on top.

CREAM OF LIMA BEANS

Mrs. A. J. Atwater

If dried beans are used, soak them over night; in the morning drain and add three pints of cold water; cook until soft and run through a sieve. Slice two onions and a carrot and cook in two tablespoonfuls of butter; remove vegetables, add two tablespoonfuls flour, salt and pepper, stirring until very smooth; add to this one cup of milk or cream and put into the strained soup; reheat and add two tablespoonfuls more of butter in small pieces.

CREAM OF MUSHROOM SOUP

Mrs. J. H. Harris

One-half pound of mushrooms, cleaned and chopped fine, add to four cups of chicken broth, cook twenty minutes; thicken with two tablespoonfuls butter and two of flour blended with one cup of boiling water. When the boiling point is reached add one cup of cream and the well beaten yolks of two eggs.

MUSHROOM SOUP

Mrs. Harry Freeman

One-half pound mushrooms, washed and peeled and chopped very fine; cover with one pint of water and boil one-half hour slowly; one quart milk scald in double boiler; season with one tablespoonful butter, salt and pepper; add mushrooms and let come to a boil. Just before serving, add finely chopped parsley. Thicken milk with one tablespoonful flour mixed with cold water and put through a strainer.

CREAM OF RICE SOUP

Mrs. W. I. Clock

One cup rice; one large onion; one quart milk; one tablespoonful butter. Boil rice in salted water until tender, press through sieve, and add milk slowly, stirring constantly until all is well mixed, lastly add butter and season to taste.

CREAM OF SPINACH

Wash and cook enough spinach to make a pint; chop it fine and put in a pan with two tablespoonfuls of butter, one teaspoonful salt and a few gratings of nutmeg; cook and stir it about ten minutes; add three pints of soup stock, let it boil up and put it through a strainer. Set it on the fire again and when at the boiling point remove and add one tablespoonful of butter and one teaspoonful of sugar. Thicken with flour mixed with milk or water.

CREAM OF TOMATO

Cook one quart of tomatoes with one slice onion, two teaspoonfuls sugar and one-fourth teaspoonful soda about fifteen minutes; rub through a sieve and set to one side. Scald one quart of milk and thicken with flour diluted with cold water; be careful that the mixture is free from lumps; cook from fifteen to twenty minutes; when ready to serve combine the mixtures, add bits of butter, salt and pepper and a spoonful of whipped cream on top.

CHOWDER

Mrs. C. A. Carscadin

One can of corn; one cupful of diced potatoes; one and one-half inch cube of fat salt pork; one tablespoonful onion juice; four cupfuls of scalded milk; two tablespoonfuls of butter; a teaspoonful of salt and a teaspoonful of pepper. Cut pork into small bits and fry until nicely browned; add onion juice and milk and potatoes, which have been boiled in salted water until tender; corn, salt and pepper. Let all just come to the boiling point. Put a few rolled crackers in each plate and pour in chowder. Tomatoes may be added if liked.

CLAM SOUP

Chop fine 25 clams. Put over the fire the liquor that was drained from them and a cup of water; add the chopped clams and boil half an hour; season to taste with salt, pepper and butter; boil up again and add one quart of milk, boiling hot, and two crackers which have been rolled fine. Serve.

MOCK CHICKEN SOUP

L. E. Kennedy

Two tablespoonfuls flour; one and one-half pints beef stock; two tablespoonfuls cream; one egg; butter size of an egg. Put butter and flour in a saucepan, stir until smooth; add stock little by little; just before taking from the fire add the cream and egg well beaten together. Salt and pepper to taste.

COURT BOUILLON

Mrs. Robert Woods

Take six nice slices of red fish, roll them in flour, season with salt and fry in hot lard, but not entirely done, simply brown on both sides, and set aside. For the sauce, fry in hot lard a large onion chopped fine and a spoonful of flour. When brown, stir in a wineglass of claret, large spoonfuls of garlic and parsley chopped fine, three bay leaves, a spray of thyme, a piece of strong red pepper and salt to taste. Lastly, add your fried fish and cook slowly for an hour. Serve with toast bread.

TOMATO BOUILLON

Clara L. Scott

Four cups tomato; four stalks celery; one small onion; four cups water; sugar, salt and pepper to taste; boil until celery is well done. Strain and serve in cups with whipped cream.

VEGETABLE BOUILLON

Mrs. W. L. Gregson

Two tablespoonfuls of sugar; one carrot; one onion; one pint tomatoes; three stalks celery (or salt spoon of celery seed); two whole cloves; one salt spoon pepper; one bay leaf; blade of mace; one teaspoonful salt; two quarts cold water; white of one egg; small piece of butter. Burn sugar in kettle, add onion and brown; add carrot and celery, and then cold water and other ingredients except butter and egg. Mix thoroughly, boil, strain through two thicknesses of cheese-cloth, add butter and serve.

JELLIED TOMATO BOUILLON

Mrs. P. J. Lanten

Put one quart of tomatoes in pan and simmer twenty minutes; add one-third package of gelatine and stir until dissolved. Strain through a fine sieve, season with salt, pepper and put in ice box to harden. Cut in cubes in bouillon cups and serve with thin slices of lemon.

CREOLE GUMBO

Mrs. Robert Woods

Clean a nice young chicken, cut in pieces and fry in hot lard. Add a large sliced onion, a spoonful of flour, two dozen boiled shrimps, two dozen oysters and a few pieces of ham. Fry all together and when brown add a quart and a half of water, and let boil for an hour. Season with chopped parsley, salt and strong pepper. Just before removing and while boiling, stir in quickly a teaspoonful of the powdered file. Take away and pour in tureen. Serve hot with rice cooked dry.

CREOLE GUMBO No. 2

Mrs. Robert Woods

Cut an old fat chicken into small pieces, chop small four onions, place the onions in five ounces of lard and let cook until well browned. Then put in four spoonfuls of flour and let cook five minutes. Put in half gallon good rich stock, add a can of tomatoes, can of okra, season with salt, pepper and cayenne. Tie a small quantity of thyme, sweet bay leaves and parsley in a bit of cloth. Then add twenty-four large shrimps, half dozen hard shell crabs and twenty-four oysters. Let the whole cook for two hours on slow fire. Serve with rice boiled dry for each person.

BROWN SOUP

Mrs. Joseph T. Bowen

After boiling a soup bone thoroughly, add a can of tomatoes; strain and put it on the stove again; brown flour enough to thicken it to the consistence of cream; add a lemon or two (sliced very thin and boiled a few minutes in water); one teaspoonful each of ground cloves; cinnamon and allspice. Just before you wish to serve add the hard boiled yolk of an egg for each person; chop the whites and put in the tureen.

SPLIT PEA SOUP

Mrs. W. D. Hurlbut

Wash well a pint of split peas and cover with cold water, adding one-third teaspoonful of soda; let them remain in this over night to swell. In the morning put them in a kettle with a close fitting top; pour over them three quarts of cold water, adding half a pound of lean ham or bacon cut into slices or pieces; also a teaspoonful salt, a little pepper and a stalk of celery cut fine. When the soup begins to boil, skim the froth from the surface. Cook slowly from three to four hours, stirring occasionally until the peas are all dissolved. Strain through a colander and leave out meat. It should be quite thick. If not rich enough, add a small piece of butter. Serve with small squares of toasted bread cut up and added.

POTATO SOUP

Anna Moss

Peel and slice five medium sized potatoes, cook in boiling salted water; when soft put through a strainer. Scald one quart of milk with one small onion sliced, remove onion and add milk slowly to potatoes. Melt three tablespoonfuls butter, add two tablespoonfuls of flour, one teaspoonful salt, one-quarter spoonful celery salt and dash of white pepper and stir until thoroughly mixed, add to the boiling soup; cook one minute, strain and serve; sprinkle with chopped parsley.

MEAT JELLY

L. E. Kennedy

Two pounds of lean beef; one-half gallon cold water; six whole cloves; one-half box gelatin soaked in one-half cupful of water for fifteen minutes; six black pepper corns; one tablespoonful salt; two tablespoonfuls sherry; the juice of one lemon. Cut the beef into the water, add peppercorns, cloves and salt and let simmer slowly four hours. Add the gelatin and strain; to this add lemon juice and pour into a mold. When cold it will slice nicely.

RICE AND TOMATO SOUP

Boil to a pulp, in a quart of water, twelve ripe tomatoes which have been peeled and cut up. Strain, place on stove and add two tablespoonfuls butter rubbed into two tablespoonfuls of flour; add salt, pepper and sugar to taste, onion juice and minced parsley. Cook ten minutes and stir in one cup of cooked rice.

ONION SOUP

Mrs. E. P. Rowen

Slice and boil until tender eight medium sized onions; have a strong soup stock ready; add the onions and season to taste. In each plate place a piece of toast and grate Parmesan cheese over it, then slowly add the soup the heat of which will melt the cheese. Serve.

OXTAIL SOUP

Mrs. H. J. Keil

One nice meaty oxtail; two medium sized carrots; two onions; one small turnip; two-thirds teaspoonful Kitchen Bouquet; one bay leaf; four peppercorns; two or three celery leaves; dash of pepper; salt to taste. Wash and cover oxtail with water, add carrots cut in cubes. Cut onion and turnip fine and put in a muslin bag with bay leaf, peppercorns and celery leaves. This will leave only the carrot and meat in soup for table. Bring to a boil and simmer for about four hours. Add pepper, salt and Kitchen Bouquet and serve.

PEA PUREE

Mrs. H. P. E. Hafer

Boil one can of peas with a half a pound of salt pork until very soft. Strain and squeeze through a colander. Add one pint of soup stock and one-half pint of cream. Salt and pepper to taste. Serve with whipped cream.

DUCHESS SOUP

One quart of milk; three slices of onion; one tablespoonful flour; one tablespoonful butter; three tablespoonfuls grated cheese; two egg yolks beaten; one teaspoonful Kitchen Bouquet. Simmer onion in butter, but do not brown; add flour and milk and stir until smooth, then add the cheese and Kitchen Bouquet. Just before taking up add the yolks of eggs. Whip some cream and put one teaspoonful in each cup.

SATISFACTION SOUP

Alice Clock

One cup navy beans; four slices bacon; one No. 2 can of tomatoes; one small onion; one level tablespoonful salt; one-fourth tablespoonful black pepper. Soak navy beans over night, in morning put beans on to boil with a pinch of soda in water. When they come to a boil, pour off this water, return to stove, cover with clear water, add onion and bacon, let boil until tender. When tender strain through sieve, being sure to press all through, as far as possible. Next add the strained tomatoes and seasoning and lastly, thin with cream or milk to consistency desired.

SCOTCH BROTH

Mrs. C. A. Bowman

Cut mutton into small pieces and let it stew all day. Boil one-fourth pint pearl barley in a little water until tender; strain it dry, chop fine two large onions and turnips and put with the barley and meat into a stew pan. Strain the broth into it, also the water from the barley and let it boil one and a half hours and skim. Season with salt and pepper.



FISH

"The fish called the flounder, perhaps you may know, Has one side for use and another for show; One side for the public, a delicate brown, And one that is white, which he always keeps down." —HOLMES.

FISH DELIGHT

Mrs. William Blanchard

Mix enough uncooked white fish or Halibut to make two cups; add half a cup soft bread crumbs; three-fourths cup cream. Press through a colander, season with salt, pepper, lemon juice, and a little Worcestershire sauce. Fold in carefully beaten whites of the two eggs. Turn into buttered molds and steam one hour. Serve hot with Hollandaise sauce.

STEAMED HALIBUT, LOBSTER SAUCE

Mrs. W. R. McGhee

Butter a steamer and place a thick slice of Halibut steak on it; put over hot water and cook until done. Remove to hot platter and pour over it hot lobster sauce.

Lobster Sauce: Remove the meat from a fresh lobster, about one and one-half pounds; make a rich cream sauce, add the lobster and pour over Halibut.

BAKED HALIBUT

One thick slice of Halibut; one small onion; one tablespoonful butter; one saltspoonful pepper; one teaspoonful Kitchen Bouquet; one level teaspoonful salt; one-half cup water. Chop the onion and put in bottom of baking pan. Put Halibut on top and dust with salt and pepper. Pour over the water to which has been added the Kitchen Bouquet, and then add the melted butter. Bake in rather quick oven until nicely browned. Garnish with parsley and slices of lemon and pour over sauce left in pan.

FISH SOUFFLE

Mrs. W. I. Clock

One cup baked fish; four eggs; one cup bread crumbs; one heaping tablespoonful butter. Mix flaked fish and fresh bread or crumbs, place in greased baking dish, pour over the beaten eggs and milk; the seasoning should be added to the fish and bread crumbs before placing in dish. Add the butter in small pieces over the top of the dish, before placing in oven. Bake in hot oven thirty minutes.

FISH WITH TOMATO SAUCE

Mrs. Robert Woods

Bake a well selected fish in oven after seasoning with pepper and salt. When done serve with sauce made as follows:

Pour a quantity of sweet oil in a saucepan. When hot, add two sliced onions and when they are cooked, add flour and let onions brown in same. Strain a can of tomatoes and add thereto a small glass of good wine, and a box of mushrooms chopped fine. Let sauce cook, after adding a boquet of thyme, sweet bay, cloves, green onions and garlic. Use red pepper only; and pour over baked fish and serve.

CODFISH BALLS

Mrs. C. A. Jennings

One and one-half cupfuls of raw codfish picked up; three cupfuls of raw potatoes, diced; one egg; butter size of a walnut; boil potatoes and fish together until potatoes are soft. Mash, and add pepper and a dash of salt, butter and unbeaten egg and beat until light and thoroughly mixed. Shape roughly in a tablespoon and fry in smoking fat.

COD FISH BALLS

Belle Shaw

Half pint measure of raw potatoes, cut in small pieces; one-half pint cod, picked to small pieces. Boil together until potatoes are tender; pour off water and mash very fine; add one egg, one tablespoonful cream and dash pepper. Form on a spoon and fry in hot lard. Lay on brown paper to absorb grease. Serve with cream sauce if desired.

Sauce: One tablespoonful butter; one tablespoonful flour; cook but do not brown. Add to this a pint boiling milk, a pinch salt, and a few pieces of cod to flavor.

CODFISH PUFF

Mrs. Grant Beebe

Two cups shredded codfish; one cup milk; one tablespoonful flour for thickening; three eggs. Put milk on stove to warm, then add thickening, then codfish that has been soaked and drained, then the beaten yolks. Lastly fold in the whites beaten.

BROILED FINNAN HADDIE

Mrs. W. D. Hurlbut

Wash fish well; lay in dripping pan, cover with fresh water and allow to stand an hour. Drain, place on fish plank, brush with melted butter and put under blaze, not too close, and broil for twenty minutes, or until a nice brown. Take out plank, surround the edge with mashed potatoes, decorate with hard boiled eggs and sprigs of parsley.

FRIED SHAD ROE

Mrs. W. R. McGhee

Boil shad roe for fifteen minutes in acidulated salted water; remove, cover with cold water and let stand for a few minutes; dry thoroughly and roll in cracker crumbs, egg and again in crumbs and fry. Garnish with lemon slices.

STUFFING FOR FISH

Mrs. Max Mauermann

One cup cracker crumbs; one saltspoon salt; one saltspoon pepper; one saltspoon chopped onions; one saltspoon parsley; one teaspoonful capers; one teaspoonful chopped pickles; small piece of butter.

SHAD ROE, BAKED—CASSEROLE

Mrs. Louis Geyler

Boil roe in salted water (acidulated) five minutes, drain, and cover with cold water five minutes; drain and wipe dry. Brush with melted butter, dust with salt and pepper and paprika. Put in casserole, pour on one-half cup stock and one-fourth cup best sherry or water and bake twenty minutes. Add to sauce two or three yolks mixed with one cup cream and strain over roe. Or pour over thin tomato sauce.

FROGS LEGS A LA POULETTE

Mrs. W. D. Hurlbut

Trim and clean the frogs legs; boil three minutes. Cover with a sauce made as follows: Three tablespoonfuls butter and three of flour rubbed together; add one-half cup of cream and one cup of chicken stock; season with salt and pepper and just before serving add the yolks of two eggs, well beaten, and one-half tablespoonful lemon juice. Very nice served in a chafing dish.

FROGS LEGS, TARTARE SAUCE

Trim and wipe the desired number of frogs legs; sprinkle with salt and pepper, dip in fine cracker crumbs, beaten egg and again in crumbs. Fry three minutes in deep hot fat. Drain and serve at once with tartare sauce.

SALMON EN CASSEROLE

Mrs. George D. Milligan

One pint milk; three tablespoonfuls flour; stir until smooth; cook and remove from fire; add one-half cup butter. When cool add two well beaten eggs, pepper and salt and bake in casserole, putting a layer of sauce, then salmon and finish with bread crumbs on top. Bake about thirty minutes.

MOULDED SALMON

Mrs. C. A. Robinson

One can of salmon; three eggs; one-half pint milk; chopped parsley, pepper and salt and a little Worcestershire sauce. Chop the salmon very fine, first picking away all skin and bone; beat the eggs, add the seasoning, mix thoroughly and steam two hours in a mould.

SALMON CROQUETTES

Mrs. George Longwell

One pound of salmon; one cup cream; two tablespoonfuls butter; one tablespoonful flour; three eggs, seasoning. Chop the salmon fine, make a cream sauce of the butter, flour and cream; add the salmon and seasoning; boil one minute; stir in one well beaten egg and remove from fire. When cold, make into croquettes; dip in cracker crumbs, then in beaten eggs, again in cracker crumbs and fry in deep fat.

COLD SALMON LOAF

Mrs. R. E. P. Kline

One pound can of salmon; one-half tablespoonful each of sugar and flour; one tablespoonful melted butter; one teaspoonful salt; one-half teaspoonful mustard; dash of cayenne; yolks of two eggs, beaten; three-fourths cup milk or cream; one-fourth cup vinegar. Pick salmon over and put with other ingredients (after carefully blending them) into double boiler; cook until eggs are done; remove from fire and add three tablespoonfuls of gelatin, softened in cold water. Mould, chill, and serve with cucumber sauce.

Sauce: One-half cup cream, beaten; season with salt, pepper and a little onion juice. Add two tablespoonfuls vinegar and one cucumber chopped fine and drained as dry as possible.

SALMON EN SURPRISE

Mrs. T. D. McMicken

Moisten one cup flaked salmon with butter sauce, pinch minced parsley; one hard boiled egg, chopped fine. Line individual buttered molds with mashed potatoes. Fill centers with fish, cover with potato. Turn out carefully, roll in egg crumbs and fry brown. Garnish with a slice of hard boiled egg on top of mold and parsley.

SMOKED STURGEON AND SCRAMBLED EGGS

Mrs. W. D. Hurlbut

Mince one-half pound smoked sturgeon; beat six eggs until light, add sturgeon; have butter heated in a skillet, add the mixture and scramble. Serve with toast points.

EGG SAUCE FOR FISH

Mrs. Maxwell

Cook together a tablespoonful each of butter and flour; pour upon this a cupful of sweet milk and stir until thick and smooth. Season with salt and white pepper, add one hard boiled egg chopped fine; and one raw egg beaten light. Stir just long enough for the sauce to return to the boil and serve.



SHELL FISH

"I wiped away the weeds and foam, I fetched my sea-born treasures home."

OYSTER SAUSAGE

Mrs. W. L. Gregson

One-half pound of veal; one pint oysters; one-fourth pound of suet; all chopped fine. Add enough rolled cracker to make into patties; dip in egg and fry in butter.

OYSTER CROQUETTES

Mrs. Frank Maccoy

Two sets of calf brains, stewed in salt water; one quart oysters, stew in their own liquor until they curl, cut in small pieces. Chop brains and mix with oysters; two tablespoonfuls melted butter; a few drops onion juice; four tablespoonfuls bread crumbs; one-half cup cream. If too dry add a little of the oyster juice. Bake in shells.

DEVILED OYSTERS

One pint of oysters, seasoned with salt and pepper, stiffened with cracker dust to hold shape, place in oyster shells, pour over melted butter. Put shells in a dripping pan and bake in a quick oven to a light brown.

CREAMED OYSTERS IN CHAFING DISH

Mrs. Marquis Regan

Put large tablespoonful of butter in chafing dish, when melted add two tablespoonfuls of sifted flour, mix thoroughly, then add juice strained from one quart of oysters, cook until thickness of cream, constantly stirring, then add oysters, cook until edges curl, season to taste with salt and pepper, serve on toasted crackers.

OYSTERS SCALLOPED WITH CELERY

Blanch Ellis Layton

One quart of bulk oysters, one-half dozen stalks of celery, cut into one-half inch pieces. Drain the oysters, reserving the liquor. Cover bottom of baking dish with crumbs of bread or crackers, then a layer of the oysters, with a generous dash of salt and pepper and plenty of butter. Over this put a lawyer of the celery, fill the dish in this way and pour over one cup of the oyster liquor. On top sprinkle a thick layer of the crumbs, adding butter in small pieces. Bake one hour in a moderate oven.

OYSTER PIE

Line a shallow pudding pan with light pastry, put in oysters, milk, butter, salt and pepper, bake in a very quick oven 20 minutes; one pint of oysters, one pint milk, one tablespoonful butter, salt and pepper to taste.

ROAST OYSTERS ON THE HALF SHELL

Mrs. W. D. Hurlbut

Scrub the shells of live oysters until free from sand; place in dripping pan in a hot oven and roast until shells open; take off the top shell, being careful not to spill the juice in lower shell; serve in the shell with side dish of melted butter.

PANNED OYSTERS

Mrs. H. Clay Calhoun

Clean one pint of oysters and drain from their liquor. Put in a stewpan and cook until oysters are plump and edges begin to curl. Shake pan to prevent oysters from adhering to pan. Season with salt, pepper and two tablespoonfuls butter and put over small slices of toast. Garnish with parsley.

OYSTER FRICASSEE

Mrs. Arthur M. Lucius

Clean one pint of oysters, heat oyster liquor to boiling point, strain through double thickness of cheese-cloth; add oysters to liquor and cook until plump. Remove oysters with skimmer and add enough cream to oysters to make one cupful. Melt two tablespoonfuls butter and add two of flour; then pour on gradually the hot liquor; add salt, paprika, one teaspoonful finely minced parsley and one egg slightly beaten. Pour over oysters and serve.

BROILED OYSTERS

Mrs. W. D. Hurlbut

Clean oysters and dry on a towel. Dip in butter, then in cracker crumbs seasoned with salt and pepper; place in a buttered wire broiler and broil until juice runs; turn and cook other side. Place on toast, mince celery over the oysters and pour over all a thin cream sauce.

BROILED OYSTERS

Mrs. W. K. Mitchell

Select large oysters; wrap a thin slice of bacon around each, fastening with a toothpick; place in a broiler, which in turn is put in a dripping pan to catch the drippings; broil until bacon is brown and crisp, turning to cook other side. Garnish with parsley.

OYSTERS IN BROWN SAUCE

One pint oysters; one-fourth cup butter; one-fourth cup flour; one cupful oyster liquor; one-half cup milk; one teaspoonful Kitchen Bouquet; one-half teaspoonful salt; one-eighth teaspoonful pepper. Parboil and drain the oysters. Brown the butter, add the flour and stir until well blended, add oyster liquor, milk, Kitchen Bouquet, salt, pepper and oysters. Serve in patty cases or ramekins.

CASSEROLE OF OYSTERS

Miss Agnes Sieber

Line ramekins or large casserole with minced chicken, seasoned well, and moistened with a little cream. Fill with parboiled oysters cut in pieces, and mushrooms sliced sauted in butter and mixed with the following sauce: Cook three tablespoonfuls salt pork fat with three of flour, add salt, cayenne, nutmeg and parsley; also thyme and mushroom parings. Cook a moment, add one and one-half cups white stock, and simmer one hour, skimming often. Strain, add about one-half cup hot cream or enough to make sauce right consistency. Add four drops lemon juice. Cover with more chicken, sprinkle with buttered crumbs, and brown in oven.

OYSTERS AND MACARONI

Mrs. H. Clay Calhoun

Boil macaroni in salted water, drain through a colander. Drain oysters until the liquor is all off. In a casserole put alternate layers of macaroni, oysters and a thick cream sauce, until dish is filled; sprinkle top with grated cheese and bake about half an hour.

OMELETTE AUX HUITRES

Mrs. R. Woods

Drain two dozen oysters. Have ready some hot lard and throw them in. Let fry until they begin to curl, then spread over them four well beaten eggs seasoned with salt and pepper and stir all together until done. Serve hot.

FRIED SCALLOPS

Clean one quart of scallops, turn into a saucepan and cook until they begin to shrivel; drain and dry between towels. Roll in fine cracker crumbs seasoned with salt and pepper, dip in egg and again in crumbs and fry in deep fat. Garnish with slices of lemon dipped in parsley.

JAMBALAYA OF RICE AND SHRIMPS

Mrs. Robert Woods

Boil two dozen of large shrimps; when cold, peel and set aside. Fry in hot lard a chopped onion and a cupful of rice washed in cold water. Let the onion and rice fry well, add the shrimps, stirring constantly. When browned, add enough water to cover the whole. Season with salt and pepper, a bay leaf, thyme and chopped parsley. Let boil slowly, and add water until the rice is well cooked. When done, let it dry and serve hot.

SHRIMP FRICASSEE

Mrs. Ada Woods

Boil the desired quantity of shrimp and set aside. For sauce fry in three tablespoonfuls bacon drippings a large onion, chopped fine; when browned, add three tablespoonfuls flour and blend; add slowly about a quart of water, stirring constantly; when smooth add the shrimp; season with a bay leaf, thyme, a tablespoonful chopped parsley and a clove of garlic, minced. Let cook slowly until ready to serve. Boil rice until dry and creamy and serve with the above.

SHRIMP RAMIKINS

Mrs. Max Mauermann

One pint of shrimp; one tablespoonful flour; one tablespoonful butter; one tablespoonful catsup; one tablespoonful cream; one cup hot soup stock; two yolks eggs; salt, cayenne pepper and grated onion. Heat butter, add flour, then other ingredients. Cook until smooth, then add shrimp. Fill the ramikins with mixture and cover with cracker crumbs and butter. Bake six minutes.

SHRIMP WIGGLE

Mrs. Willard Brown

Make a rich cream sauce; add one can of shrimp and one can of green peas; allow to cook until all is well heated, serve on toast.

CRAB A LA CREOLE

One can Japanese crab meat; four tablespoonfuls shortening; two green peppers; one large onion; three tomatoes; one cupful milk; two tablespoonfuls flour; one teaspoonful Kitchen Bouquet, one teaspoonful salt, one-fourth teaspoonful pepper. Make a white sauce by melting half the shortening, add flour and when well mixed slowly add milk; stir until creamy, add salt and pepper. In another saucepan melt the other half of shortening, when hot, fry onion and pepper, minced, for ten minutes. Then add tomatoes, cut up, and when tender add Kitchen Bouquet and crab meat and stir slowly into the white sauce. When well mixed, pour over buttered toast and serve.

LOBSTER A LA BOUQUET

One good sized lobster; two ounces butter; one small onion; one can mushrooms; one pint boiling water; one teaspoonful Kitchen Bouquet; one teaspoonful salt; one saltspoonful pepper. Put the butter and chopped onion in saucepan, cook until onion is brown, then add two tablespoonfuls flour and the water. When boiling add salt and pepper. Strain and add mushrooms and Kitchen Bouquet. Simmer for ten minutes then stand over hot water. Cut lobster in good sized pieces, put into sauce, cover the pan closely, let stand ten minutes longer over hot water and serve.



MEATS AND FOWL

"Some hae meat and canna eat, And some wad eat that want it. But we hae meat and we can eat, And, so the Lord be thank it."

BEEFSTEAK ROLL

Mrs. J. E. Kelly

Use a large slice of round steak cut one-half inch thick. Make a dressing by mixing together: One cupful grated breadcrumbs, two-thirds teaspoonful salt, one well-beaten egg, one tablespoonful melted butter, one small onion, grated, a few dashes of paprika and a half teaspoonful powdered sweet herbs. Lay the steak on a board, sprinkle with salt and pepper, spread thickly with the dressing and roll up. Wind with soft cord to hold in place. Put three tablespoonfuls of pork fat in a frying pan and when very hot, dredge the roll with flour and brown it quickly on all sides. Place meat in kettle that has a tight fitting cover. Meanwhile, add to the fat in the pan two slices of minced onion, and one tablespoonful flour. Stir until very smooth, pour in a cupful of stock (or hot water) and when the gravy boils, pour over the roll with a pint of strained tomato. Season to taste with salt and pepper, cover the kettle closely and as soon as the contents boil, place where it will simmer for about two hours. When cooked, remove the strings, and serve on a heated platter, with the strained gravy poured over it.

HAMBURGER POT DINNER

Mrs. Antonio Sterba

With two pounds hamburger steak, mix well one cup raw rice (wash well); one medium sized onion, chopped; season and make into balls. Line bottom of a pot with small pieces of suet; when this is melted, place meat balls in the pot, cover with water, and cook until rice is about done. Add one can of tomatoes (quart can). A half hour before serving, peel enough medium-sized potatoes to circle the platter to be used. Place these on top of tomatoes. When potatoes are done, arrange them around the outside rim of the platter with the meat balls in the center, and pour over the meat enough gravy for first serving. Remainder of gravy may be used on table in a casserole or gravy dish. Care must be used in measuring the rice—too much will cause the balls to fall to pieces. One advantage of this dish is that it may be prepared the day before, or the morning before serving, with the exception of the potatoes.

CALVES' HEARTS STUFFED AND BRAISED

Mrs. W. R. McGhee

Remove veins, arteries, and blood clots, wash, stuff and sew. Sprinkle with salt, pepper, roll in flour and brown richly in hot dripping. Place in Dutch oven or in one of the small vessels in fireless cooker. Half cover with boiling water, surround with six slices carrot, one stalk celery, broken in pieces, one onion sliced, two sprays parsley, a bit of bay leaf, three cloves and one-half teaspoonful peppercorns. Cover closely and bake slowly two or more hours basting often if cooked in Dutch oven. If necessary, add more water. Remove hearts to serving platter, strain and thicken the liquor with flour diluted with water. Season with salt, pepper and one-half teaspoonful Kitchen Bouquet.

LUNCHEON BEEF

Mrs. I. A. Wilcox

One cup or more of cold cooked beef chopped; one cup of bread crumbs; season with salt, pepper and butter. Place in baking dish and cover with buttered bread crumbs. Pour milk in dish until you can just see it. Bake in oven till light brown on top. Can use any kind of cold cooked beef, as steak, roast, or boiled beef. If you have a few cold mashed potatoes, put them through ricer on top of meat to form upper crust. Dot with butter and let brown.

POT ROAST

Mary S. Vanzwoll

Round steak one and one-half inches thick. Salt and pepper. Pound a cup of flour in, on both sides. Sear both sides in melted fat, and butter. Put in baking dish and cover with water. Cook in oven two and one-half hours.

SPANISH STEAK

Mrs. W. H. Hart

One and one-half pounds round steak, ground; one and one-half pounds of pork steak, ground; one heaping cupful bread crumbs; one cupful canned or fresh tomatoes; two green peppers, minced; one-half cupful minced onion; one egg; two teaspoonfuls salt. Mix all together and bake forty-five minutes in flat cake.

BRAISED BEEF

Mrs. I. S. Blackwelder

Round steak about three inches thick (about two pounds); place in a hot skillet and turn so that it is seared on both sides, to prevent escape of juices. In a covered baking pan make a bed of chopped vegetables (potatoes, turnips, carrots, onions, etc.); season well. Place upon it the beef with enough water to keep the mess steaming for four hours. Cover tight.

MOTHER'S BEEF LOAF

Mrs. F. E. Lyons

Three pounds round steak, ground; three eggs; two-thirds cup cracker crumbs; three teaspoonfuls ground sage; two teaspoonfuls salt; one teaspoonful pepper. Mix together thoroughly and bake in a 5x10-inch bread pan, from one to one and one-half hours.

MEAT PIE

Butter an earthen baking dish and line to the depth of one and one-half inches with hot mashed potatoes, season with finely chopped chives (one tablespoonful to two cups mashed potatoes). Fill center with chopped left-over cold beef, veal or chicken. Moisten with brown or cream sauce, to which add one-half tablespoonful minced parsley and onion juice. Cover with a layer of the potato mixture, make several openings in top of pie and brush top over with beaten egg, diluted with milk. Bake in hot oven until heated through and well browned. Serve hot in baking dish.

BRAISED LARDED LIVER

Mrs. W. R. McGhee

Skewer, tie in shape (if necessary) and lard the upper side of calf's liver. Place in a deep pan with remnants of lardoons; season with salt and pepper; dredge with flour. Surround with one-half each carrot, onion, celery, cut in dice; one-half teaspoonful peppercorns, six cloves, bit of bay leaf and two cups brown stock or water. Cover closely and bake slowly two hours, uncover the last twenty minutes of cooking. Remove from pan, serve with the French onions or pour around brown sauce.

HAMBURG STEAK

Sue C. Woodman

Mix one egg and a little salt and pepper; make into balls and bake in closed pan quickly.

POT ROAST

Mrs. C. S. Junge

Procure a Boston cut of roast of beef; brown a minced onion in skillet with butter and bacon fat; in this brown all sides of the roast. Remove the roast and in the fat stir two tablespoonfuls of flour and fill skillet nearly full of hot water. Season this gravy well with salt, pepper, bay and garlic and pour over roast in casserole. Place a few slices of tomato on top or pour in a cup of strained tomato; place some carrots around the roast and put in cooker for at least four hours.

BRAIN PATTIES

Mrs. E. Iglehart

Plunge the calf's brains into boiling water for three minutes, remove from water and pick off the dark muscles, roll into cracker dust or bread crumbs in small patties and drop into hot fat. Salt and pepper.

ROAST BEEF SOUFFLE

Mrs. H. S. Hart

One tablespoonful butter melted in sauce pan, one tablespoonful of flour added and well mixed, one cup milk. Chop beef, or any kind of cold meat quite fine and add to milk after it has thickened; salt and pepper to taste. Then stir in the yolks of three eggs, cook slightly, cool, add beaten whites of eggs. Put in greased dish and bake about half an hour. Is nice served with tomato sauce or peas. About one and one-half cups of the chopped meat for the above.

MEAT LOAF

Mrs. L. E. Brown

Two pounds of round steak; one pound fresh pork; four tomatoes; three pimentoes; two eggs; four crackers, rolled; salt, pepper and paprika. Mix altogether; bake in bread pan two hours in moderate oven. Sauce: One and one-half tablespoonfuls butter, flour and milk. Season with liquid from meat.

TOUGH STEAKS

Mrs. E. S. Smith

Pour a mixture of two tablespoonfuls of vinegar; and one of olive oil over a steak. Let stand several hours before broiling. The result is delicious.

VEAL CROQUETTES

Belle Shaw

Two pounds veal, chopped fine; one teaspoonful chopped parsley; two eggs, hard boiled and chopped; salt and pepper, to taste. Soak enough bread crumbs, and add to mixture; form balls. Roll in egg and cracker crumbs and fry in deep fat.

BONED AND STUFFED LEG OF LAMB

Mrs. H. L. Baumgardner

Order a leg of lamb boned at the market. Make a stuffing as for chicken. Put in roasting pan with a small sliced onion, one-fourth cup each of turnip and carrot, season with bay leaf and parsley. Add three cupfuls of hot water, salt and pepper. Cook slowly until done. Serve with Currant Jelly Sauce.

Currant Jelly Sauce: To the regular brown gravy you would make with roast, add one-half cupful of currant jelly which has been beaten and a little lemon juice; well stirred together and let all boil a minute or two.

LAMB STEW A LA CREOLE

Wipe three pounds lamb, cut from neck or shoulder. Cut into pieces two inches square. Melt one-fourth cup dripping, add meat and stir and brown evenly. Add two onions, thinly sliced, one sprig parsley, small bit bay leaf, two cloves and one-half teaspoonful peppercorns (tie last three spices in a bit of cheese cloth), and boiling water to nearly cover meat. Simmer slowly until meat is tender (about one and one-half hours). Then add two or three small carrots, scraped and cut in lengthwise pieces, season with salt. Parboil six medium-sized potatoes cut in thick slices five minutes, drain, add to stew; add two cups thick tomato puree and simmer slowly until vegetables are tender. Add more water if necessary. Remove spices, add one cup French peas when heated through, turn into deep, hot platter and sprinkle with chopped parsley.

LAMB HASH WITH GREEN PEPPERS

Mrs. W. D. Hurlbut

Mince cold roast lamb in about half inch pieces; add a sweet green pepper, minced (discarding seeds); add the gravy and heat thoroughly. Serve on toast.

RECIPE FOR CORNING BEEF

Mrs. W. T. Foster

Five tablespoonfuls of salt; two tablespoonfuls of brown sugar; one-half teaspoonful salt peter, or less; this is for five pounds of beef. Cover with water; leave three or four days and boil in same water.

MOCK TERRAPIN

Mrs. W. H. Muschlet

Two cupfuls cold boiled or roast lamb cut into small pieces. Put a tablespoonful of butter into double boiler; when melted add one tablespoonful of flour. Rub smooth; add one pint of milk; stir continuously till it thickens; then set pot back where it won't cook hard, and add one well beaten egg, a tablespoonful minced parsley, a little nutmeg, red pepper, salt to taste, two hard boiled eggs cut (not too fine); then the lamb. Let it keep hot, but not boil, till lamb is thoroughly heated. When serving, add a teaspoonful lemon juice.

VEAL LOAF WITH EGG

Mrs. H. B. Rairden

Two and one-half pounds of veal; two pork chops, ground together; three eggs; three rolled crackers; one teaspoonful each salt and pepper. Mix well together. Put half of mixture in a loaf pan, peel six eggs which have been hard boiled, clip off the ends so they fit closely together, and lay them in the center of the loaf; place the balance of the meat about them, fill up pan, packing it solid; put in double baker on top of stove to steam for one and one-half hours, spread butter over top and put in oven to finish baking. In slicing it you get the slice of hard boiled egg in the center.

VEAL LOAF

Mrs. A. Donald Campbell

One and one-half pounds of veal and one slice of salt pork, chopped fine. Add two tablespoonfuls of cracker dust; one egg; piece of butter size of an egg; one teaspoonful each of salt and pepper; little grated nutmeg; dash of Worcestershire sauce. Mix well and bake in a loaf shaped pan with cracker crumbs and bits of butter on top. Bake about one and three-quarters hours.

BAKED SPICED HAM, ALABAMA STYLE

Mrs. K. T. Cary

Soak a fifteen pound ham in cold water to cover over night. Wash, scrub and trim off inedible parts. Set over a trivet in a boiler and cover with boiling water. Mix four cups brown sugar, one large sliced onion, one red Chili pepper pod, one tablespoonful each of whole cloves, allspice and cassia buds, two thinly sliced lemons, discarding seeds, add to water in boiler. Cover and cook slowly two and one-half hours. Remove from boiler, peel off rind and put ham in dripping pan, fat side up. Bake slowly two and one-half hours, basting with one cup sherry wine (using a tablespoon) a little at a time until all is used, then baste with dripping in pan thirty minutes, before removing from oven, sprinkle fat side with equal measures of brown sugar and fine bread crumbs, stick with cloves and brown richly. Serve hot champagne, horseradish or mustard sauce.

KOLDOLMA

Mrs. F. W. Waddell

Two pounds of veal; one pound fresh pork; one-half lemon, bay leaf and one small bottle capers; one clove of garlic; juice of one onion. Put all through grinder, salt, pepper to taste. Roll in small soft balls. Enclose neatly in cabbage leaves, secure with toothpicks. Place in Dutch oven which has previously melted one-fourth pound of butter with a little chopped parsley. Alternate layers with a small sifting of flour until all are in pan. Let simmer in one pint of water (boiling) without allowing any steam to escape for two hours; remove and thicken broth with yolks of five eggs. Serve eight persons.

VIRGINIA HAM

Mrs. G. W. Plummer

Buy a center cut of ham, two inches thick (about two and one-half or three pounds); soak over night in milk (sweet or sour) sufficient to cover ham. About two hours before serving time drain off enough milk so that the top of ham is uncovered; spread over this uncovered top; one tablespoonful dry ground mustard mixed with two tablespoonfuls brown sugar; bake in a slow oven. The milk will disappear in a rich brown gravy; if it gets too low in pan add water. When ready to serve remove ham to platter, add flour to fat in pan and when well cooked, add boiling water to make gravy of consistency of thick cream. Lemon slices and sherry may be added. It may need to be strained if milk curds are objected to; pour around ham. Has flavor of finest "Old Virginia Ham."

HAM EN CASSEROLE

Mrs. A. Donald Campbell

Have ham cut two inches thick, leaving on rind. Pour over it good, generous cup of milk and one-half cup brown sugar, partly dissolving sugar in the milk on top of stove, before pouring over ham. Cook all in casserole two hours. Serve with rings of fried apples on chop plate.

ROGNONS AUX TOMATOES

Mrs. R. Woods

Cut in small pieces a fresh kidney and fry in hot lard. When almost done add to it a sliced onion, half cup of tomatoes and a slice of ham. Let all fry together, and when done add a spoonful of flour, a piece of red pepper and a spoonful of chopped garlic and parsley. Thin with a little water, season with salt, and let boil a few minutes, when it is done.

EASTER HAM

Mrs. E. Iglehart

One-half pint grated bread crumbs, one cup currants, one saltspoonful of salt, one saltspoonful sweet marjoram or thyme, one salt spoonful of black pepper, moisten with sweet milk. Boil small ham until tender, remove bone and skin, fill in the cavity with dressing, wind with cord into shape, puncture with skewer in the fat parts and fill the holes with dressing. Bake in a closed pan in a hot oven one hour.

HAM PUFF

Mrs. A. Donald Campbell

Scald one pint of milk, one cup flour; stir constantly until thick. Let cool, then add beaten yolks of eight eggs. Beat thoroughly, add beaten whites, a little suet, one and one-half cups of chopped, boiled ham, and one-half cup butter. Set tin in pan of water, and bake three-fourths of an hour. Keep standing in water until served.

HAM LOAF

Mrs. W. C. Thorbus

Two pounds of ham, ground; one pound of pork loin, ground; two eggs, beaten; one cupful rolled cracker crumbs; one cupful milk; pepper to taste. Mix all together, put in a baking tin and pour over it one cupful tomatoes and bake two hours.

JAMABALA OF HAM

Mrs. H. Clay Calhoun

One large slice of raw ham; one large onion; put through the grinder and fry. When thoroughly cooked add two cups boiled rice; one quart of tomatoes and half of a sweet green pepper, chopped fine. Serve hot on toast.

BARBECUED ROAST PORK

Mrs. Chase

Place pork roast in dry self-basting or similar roaster. Place in oven for thirty minutes. In meantime put one cup of vinegar, one teaspoonful red pepper, one teaspoonful black pepper, one teaspoonful salt in saucepan and bring to a boil. Baste roast every fifteen or twenty minutes with this sauce at boiling point, draining off sauce after each basting and returning sauce to saucepan, which should be kept at the boiling point. Drain off sauce and serve in separate dish.

CROWN ROAST OF YOUNG PORK

Mrs. M. Dippen

Have crown roast made of young pork ribs, same as of lamb; fill the center with medium sized potatoes, boiled and rolled in butter and minced parsley; surround with fried apples.

BROILED SAUSAGE

Mrs. W. D. Hurlbut

One and one-half or two pounds of well seasoned sausage meat mold it into a flat cake; place in a frying basket which, in turn, is put in a larger pan, to catch the drippings. Put under the blaze and let it broil slowly; when nicely browned on one side turn it over and brown that side. When done remove to hot platter and surround with fried apples.

PORK CHOPS WITH POTATOES

Mrs. C. S. Junge

In a casserole place a layer of sliced raw potatoes and over it sprinkle of flour. Put in a layer of chops and a layer of potatoes and repeat until casserole is full. Nearly cover with milk that is seasoned with salt and pepper. Sprinkle cheese over top and bake two hours.

GRANDMOTHER'S PORK NOODLES

Mrs. H. D. Sheldon

One-half pound of salt pork, sliced; six medium onions; six medium potatoes; noodles. Boil salt pork until very nearly done. Add potatoes and onions. Cook until they are beginning to be tender. Have about two quarts of water left. Add noodles and finish cooking. This will make a thick stew.

PORK CHOP CASSEROLE

Mrs. George D. Milligan

Sprinkle bottom of dish with flour; place pork chops then on top a layer of sliced raw potatoes and onions, finish with bread crumbs. Bake until potatoes are done. Use no liquid.

BAKED PORK CHOPS

Sue C. Woodman

Cut thick, wash and dip in flour; place in deep pan; season with pepper, salt, and a little sage. Cover tightly and bake forty minutes in quick oven.

STUFFED PORK TENDERLOINS

Mrs. C. E. Balluff

Split two large tenderloins and flatten out as wide as possible, spread one with a very thick layer of dressing (such as is used for turkey dressing). Place the second tenderloin on this and tie them together, roast in a medium oven, basting frequently with boiling water and a small piece of melted butter.

STUFFED SPARERIBS

Mrs. H. L. Middleton

Have two sets of ribs cracked across the middle; rub the insides with salt, pepper and dredge with flour. Cook sauerkraut half an hour, drain and fill the ribs; tie or sew closely together and put in oven. Pour over the ribs the water in which the sauerkraut was boiled. When one side is browned, turn them over and brown the other side. Serve with brown gravy.

DELMONICO CLUB HOUSE SAUSAGE

Miss A. Brennan

To every twenty-one pounds of meat: Lean pork, seven pounds; fat, seven pounds; round beef, seven pounds. Seven ounces salt; one and one-half ounces black pepper; one coffee cup powdered sage and summer savory; one teaspoonful cayenne, slack; one tablespoonful freshly ground ginger; one tablespoonful ground mustard. Get your meat ground at the butchers. Mix the sausage yourself. Mix spices all together with salt, working it through the meat with your hands.

FRIED PICKLED PIGS' FEET

Mrs. W. D. Hurlbut

Have butcher split the pigs' feet; boil until bones are ready to fall out; put in an earthen dish and cover with a mild vinegar which has been boiled for ten minutes with a few slices of onion and spices; when the vinegar is cold the pigs' feet will be sufficiently pickled. Drain, roll in flour and fry.

ENGLISH SAUSAGE

Mrs. C. A. Carscadin

Six pounds lean pork; two pounds fat pork; one pound loaf bread thoroughly soaked in water; two ounces salt; one ounce best white pepper; two medium sized nutmegs, grated. Mix all together, put into chopper. Leg of pork is best, but shoulder will do.

ESCALLOPED SWEETBREADS

Mrs. E. K. Parker

One pair sweetbreads; one can mushrooms; two cups of cream; butter size of an egg; one tablespoonful flour. Parboil sweetbreads twenty minutes then chop rather fine; add mushrooms and chop. Put butter in spider and let it melt and as it begins to brown, add the flour and stir; then add cream, stirring all the time to prevent lumps. Put in the sweetbreads and mushrooms and let cook a few minutes. Add one teaspoonful Worcestershire sauce and pour mixture in baking dish. Put cracker crumbs and lumps of butter on top and bake half an hour.

CREAMED SWEETBREADS WITH TOMATO SAUCE

Mrs. W. D. Hurlbut

Parboil sweetbreads in acidulated salt water, cook slowly for twenty minutes; drain, plunge into cold water. Make a rich cream sauce, separate sweetbreads and mix with the cream sauce; put in ramekins, cover with bread crumbs; in the center place a tablespoonful tomato sauce; put in oven and bake until crumbs are brown; place a sprig of parsley on top and serve.

CHICKEN A LA KING

Mrs. W. C. Thorbus

Heat two tablespoonfuls butter until it bubbles; add one chopped green pepper; let cook slowly for three minutes, then add one tablespoonful flour; salt and pepper to taste and enough rich milk to make a smooth thickened sauce; when thoroughly done add two cupfuls cooked chicken and let it heat through. Mushrooms may be added.

CHICKEN NOODLES AND MUSHROOMS

Mrs. W. D. Hurlbut

Pick the meat from the bones and cut in rather large pieces; add a can of mushrooms and the thickened chicken gravy. Boil noodles twenty minutes in salted water; drain and add noodles to the chicken. Mix all together and let heat thoroughly. Serve with toast points.

CHICKEN A LA CREOLE

Mrs. R. Woods

Clean and cut up two young chickens, sprinkle with salt and pepper and fry in hot lard. When done, put in a dish and set aside. And now start your sauce. Fry an onion and add flour for thickening. When brown, add a can of sweet peppers, let fry a little, then add the tomatoes and a few bay leaves and a sprig of thyme. When the sauce is done throw in the fried chickens, but do not let the whole boil long.

SWEET BREAD PATTIES

Parboil one pair sweetbreads in boiling, salted, acidulated water, fifteen minutes. Drain and cut in one-half inch cubes. Add one-half the measure of small mushrooms, heated in the liquor in the can, drained, cooled and sliced, and one tablespoonful pimento cut into bits. Reheat in one and one-half cups of sauce (cream) and serve in patty shells.

BAKED MACARONI AND CHICKEN

Bertha Z. Bisbee

Stew until tender a nice fat hen, in plenty of water. Pick meat off bones and shred rather finely. Boil one pound of macaroni or spaghetti twenty minutes in plenty of water to which has been added a teaspoonful of salt. Drain as dry as possible. Cover the bottom of a buttered baking dish with the macaroni, adding chicken and macaroni in alternate layers. Add one cup of cream to the gravy in which the chicken was cooked, salt and pepper to taste, and thicken with flour or corn starch. Pour enough over the macaroni and chicken to cover it. Bake in a slow oven until nicely browned on top.

REAL COTTAGE CHICKEN

Mrs. F. W. Waddell

Boil one package of macaroni in salted water in the usual manner. Use three or four pounds chicken. Place in Dutch Oven whole. After browning, four tablespoonfuls of butter with a little parsley cover tightly and simmer forty-five minutes. Remove cover and add salt and pepper. When sufficiently cooked, so that the fowl will slip from the bone, turn out fire and let cool. Remove bones and place in receptacle once more. Add one pint of pure cream, the macaroni previously cooked, and let boil up just three minutes, and let stand until ready to serve. Better to stand for an hour.

BOUCHEES A LA REINE

Mrs. Robert Woods

Take good sized young hen and boil it. When done take all the meat, chop it, but not too fine and keep the "bouillon." Have ready some mushrooms and truffles cut in small pieces. Fry an onion in hot lard, add flour and brown well; in this throw your meat, mushrooms and truffles. Give two or three turns in the pan and add the bouillon to make the sauce. Do not make it too thin. Season with a little pepper. The small "pates" are ordered from the confectioner and are kept warm until needed. When the filling is done and you are ready to serve, fill each pate with the stew and send warm to the table.

CHICKEN IN ASPIC

Mrs. E. S. Bailey

Draw one large chicken; boil until meat drops from bones and there is about one pint of liquid. Chop chicken and add a teaspoonful of salt and one-half teaspoonful pepper; also one tablespoonful of celery salt. Hard boil three eggs and soak one-half package gelatine five minutes and add to hot liquid. Chill mold and put in layer of chicken and three eggs and put balance of chicken in. Then pour the liquid on mold and chill.

CHICKEN TERRAPIN FOR SIX PEOPLE

Mrs. J. P. Cobb

One cup of chicken cut the size of an egg; one cup of canned mushrooms; make a cream sauce of the chicken stock; when this is boiled up, add the chicken and mushrooms, yolk of one egg beaten, one teaspoonful of Worcestershire sauce, teaspoonful sherry. Serve on platter with whipped cream or brown with bread crumbs.

SPANISH CHICKEN

Mrs. Lester Tennant

Cut up two chickens, about five pounds in all; good fat yellow hens are the best. Put in a good sized pot and put in cold water enough to cover about two inches over all; cover and let heat very slowly; stew until meat can be picked from the bones. When the liquor the chicken is cooked in becomes cold, remove all fat and save to make stew in. Cut up six fair sized potatoes; one large onion; two large green peppers; one clove of garlic; one can of mushrooms; one can tomatoes; one can of peas; one bottle of little stuffed olives. Remove meat from chicken bones, then put in tomatoes, potatoes, peas, etc., in the liquor. Cut each mushroom through and add one wineglass each of olive oil and good white wine; three fair sized bay leaves; a large pinch of thyme; a few sprigs of parsley; salt; celery salt; black pepper and tobasco sauce to taste. When potatoes are done, add one large tablespoonful butter, put in the chicken meat and the stew is ready to serve. Have plenty of toast to serve chicken on. This will serve sixteen people and may be made the day before.

CURRY OF CHICKEN EN CASSEROLE

Mrs. W. P. Hilliard

Clean, singe, dress and cut up a three and one-half pound chicken as for fried chicken; melt one-third cup butter in an iron frying pan; sprinkle chicken with salt and pepper; arrange in hot frying pan and cook ten minutes, turning so as to brown evenly; add giblets; continue cooking ten minutes longer. Arrange chickens in a hot casserole with one thinly sliced onion; one-half tablespoonful salt, and broth or boiling water to cover; cover casserole and simmer in oven until chicken is tender. Remove chicken; strain liquor; melt one-fourth cup butter; add two tablespoonfuls flour, mixed with two tablespoonfuls curry powder; stir until smooth. Add strained liquor (there should be two cups); one-third cup currant jelly and salt to season. Turn one-half of sauce into casserole; arrange chicken over sauce and cover with remaining sauce. Serve in casserole. Serve boiled rice with chicken curry.

SALMI OF DUCK

Mrs. S. E. Baumgardner

Cut cold roast duck in pieces and heat in the following sauce: One tablespoonful butter; one small onion chopped fine; a stalk of celery and one sliced carrot; saute until brown then add one tablespoonful flour; two cups water; a bayleaf; a spray of parsley; a few cloves and salt and pepper; let cook a few minutes. Strain, put in the duck; add six olives sliced lengthwise; a small can of mushrooms, cut in two; let all heat and serve.

CREOLE CHICKEN

Cut two chickens in pieces for serving; sprinkle with salt and pepper. Melt one-half cup butter; add one-half cup finely chopped onion; add chickens, saute a golden brown, turning chickens to evenly brown; remove chickens; add one-half cup flour; stir until well blended; then pour on two cups chicken stock and two cups tomato puree; one mild red pepper, finely chopped; one-half can mushrooms, drained and thinly sliced; one cup finely cut celery; season with salt and pepper. Add chickens and simmer until tender. Dispose on hot serving platter; surround with sauce; garnish with parsley.

CHICKEN CURRY WITH MUSHROOMS IN CHAFING DISH

Mrs. M. Regan

One medium sized can of boneless chicken; one-half can of French mushrooms; one heaping teaspoonful Indian currypowder; one large tablespoonful of butter; two tablespoonfuls of sifted flour and two cups milk. Put butter in chafing dish, when melted add flour; then milk slowly, and salt and pepper to taste. When creamy add chicken cut fine and chopped mushrooms; stir constantly until heated thoroughly and just before serving add curry powder. Eat on hot toast.

SQUAB EN CASSEROLE

Mrs. W. D. Hurlbut

Wash squabs and stuff with boiled rice in which the cooked, minced giblets of the squabs have been mixed; place in casserole and pour a little melted butter over each squab; sprinkle with salt and pepper and onion salt. Use the water in which the giblets were cooked for stock, there should be one cup. Put in oven and bake until tender.

PIGEON PIE

Mrs. Culbertson

Dress, clean and truss six young, fat pigeons. Brown them richly in tried out salt pork fat. Put in a Dutch oven or kettle, cover with boiling water. Add two stalks celery, broken in pieces; a bit of bay leaf; one-half teaspoonful pepper-corns; one onion sliced; six slices of carrot; two sprays parsley and simmer five to six hours or until tender. Add one-half tablespoonful salt last hour of cooking. Remove pigeons; strain liquid and thicken with one-fourth cup butter, cooked one minute with one-fourth cup flour, stirring constantly, until gravy is smooth. Arrange pigeon in a deep baking dish; pour over gravy and cover with a baking powder crust, and bake in a hot oven.

A GOOD IMITATION OF MARYLAND FRIED CHICKEN

Mrs. J. G. Sherer

It may be made from rabbit. Choose a young tender rabbit; cut it into pieces of desired size; put pieces in a pot, cover with boiling water, and parboil gently for twenty minutes; dip each piece in flour, egg and cracker crumbs and fry in deep fat until a rich brown. Evaporate by boiling some of the water in which the meat was boiled. Use some of it with milk in making "cream gravy."

RABBIT STEW

Mrs. J. G. Sherer

Rub the inside of a saucepan with a dose of garlic; put in pieces of hare left; add three-quarters cup of stewed tomatoes; two raw carrots, cut into small cubes; one small onion, sliced; a teaspoonful of chopped parsley, and about a cup of hot water. Cover tightly and cook until the potatoes are tender (and carrots). Thicken and serve in a border of steamed rice and serve with tiny dumplings.

BELGIAN HARE EN CASSEROLE

Mrs. J. G. Sherer

Separate a dressed hare into pieces of desired shape; rub each piece with a little lemon juice and oil which have been stirred together. Let the meat stand covered a few hours; sprinkle with paprika and brown each piece in a little fat in a "sizzling hot" frying pan. Some use two or three slices of fat bacon cut into small pieces for the browning. When golden brown, put the meat in the casserole, cover with boiling water; cover and place in a very moderate oven. At the end of half an hour add two cups of stock or hot water; one tablespoonful of lemon juice, or vinegar, a bit of bay leaf and two teaspoonfuls of onion juice. Cook in a moderate oven about three hours. Bring to the table without removing the cover. And if you have any of the Belgian Hare en Casserole left, make for lunch the next day, the savory little Rabbit Stew.

CHOP SUEY

Mrs. J. G. Sherer

One pound veal; one pound pork; one can mushrooms; eight stalks celery; fifteen onions; two tablespoonfuls molasses; little flour on top. Cut meat in small pieces and simmer about twenty minutes; add mushrooms and molasses; then celery and onions. Cook slowly until tender. Sprinkle a little flour over it and mix well; then salt, paprika and about three tablespoonfuls or more (to taste) of chop suey sauce. Simmer meat without water; serve with boiled rice.

CHOP SUEY

Mrs. C. S. Junge

Cut tender, fresh, lean pork, chicken, veal or all of these into thin, inch squares and saute well in bacon fat. Have ready one-half as much in bulk of celery; cut in inch pieces and an onion; saute these in same fat. After this, saute mushrooms; put altogether and barely cover with hot water, chicken or veal broth. Add Chinese potatoes and sprouted barley, if they can be procured; add one tablespoonful of molasses; one teaspoonful of salt; one teaspoonful of Chinese Soy; a dash of pepper and put in cooker for three hours or more.

CHOP SUEY

Mrs. W. F. Barnard

One pound pork from shoulder; one pound veal from leg; fry one-half hour in a little fat. When brown, add a little water and cook ten minutes, and add one cup celery cut up; one onion, cut up. When nearly done, sprinkle with flour enough to thicken, add two tablespoonfuls of molasses. Serve with rice.

CHESTNUT STUFFING

Mrs. S. E. Baumgardner

Shell and blanch four cupfuls French chestnuts; cook in boiling salted water until tender; put through a ricer; season with salt, pepper and a little nutmeg; two tablespoonfuls butter and one-half cupful of cream. Add this to your regular bread mixture for stuffing fowl.

CHESTNUT STUFFING

Shell and blanch French chestnuts, there should be two cups. Cook in boiling salted water until soft. Drain, mash and pass through a potato ricer; add one-four cup butter; one teaspoonful salt; one-eighth teaspoonful pepper; a few grains nutmeg and one-half cup cream. Melt one-fourth cup butter, pour over one cup soft bread crumbs; mix well; combine mixtures and use as filling for turkey, capon or guinea chicken.

OYSTER DRESSING FOR FOWLS

Mrs. W. S. Kiskaddon

For an eight or ten-pound turkey cut the brown crust from slices of stale bread until you have as much as the inside of a pound loaf. Put into a suitable dish and pour tepid water over it; take up a handful at the time and squeeze it hard and dry with both hands, placing it as you go along in another dish; now when all is pressed dry, toss it all up lightly through your fingers; now add pepper and salt—about a tablespoonful—also powdered summer savory and sage, and one pint of oysters drained and slightly chopped. For geese and ducks the dressing may be made the same.

RICE DRESSING FOR DUCK OR GOOSE

Mrs. H. P. E. Hafer

Boil one cup of rice tender. Chop one stalk celery; two onions; one outside of green pepper; a little piece of garlic; fry in butter and add boiled rice.



SAUCES

HOLLANDAISE SAUCE

Mrs. A. Donald Campbell

One tablespoonful flour and one teaspoonful butter; mix over fire until smooth; add, gradually, one pint of boiling water, until all is the consistency of cream. Boil for two or three minutes and season with one salt spoon of salt; one-half teaspoonful mustard; one-quarter teaspoonful pepper. Take from fire and add yolks of two eggs, well beaten; mixing all until smooth. Add slowly, three tablespoonfuls oil and one tablespoonful vinegar. Lemon juice instead of vinegar makes it much more delicate.

HOLLANDAISE SAUCE

Belle Shaw

Two tablespoonfuls butter; one tablespoonful flour; one-half pint boiling water; one-half teaspoonful salt; add gradually yolks of two eggs, well beaten; juice of one-half lemon; one-half teaspoonful onion juice; cook over hot water. Be careful not to get sauce too thick.

TARTAR SAUCE NO. 1

Mrs. Carl S. Junge

Sweet cucumber pickles; green peppers and onion. Chop fine and mix with mayonnaise salad dressing.

TARTAR SAUCE NO. 2

Mrs. Carl S. Junge

Tablespoonful mixed capers; tablespoonful cucumber pickles, chopped; teaspoonful parsley; teaspoonful Tarragon; teaspoonful mixed mustard; one-half pint mayonnaise dressing.

RICH GRAVY WITHOUT MEAT

Mrs. T. M. Butler

Heat a sufficient amount of lard or drippings in a skillet into which two or three tablespoonfuls of flour have been stirred until a very light brown; then add two-thirds milk to one-third water and season with salt and pepper, adding a level teaspoonful of extract of beef and stir until completely dissolved.

A VEGETABLE SAUCE

One-half teaspoonful kitchen boquet; one level tablespoonful flour; two tablespoonfuls butter; one-fourth teaspoonful salt; two cupfuls hot milk; two egg yolks; blend flour and butter; add salt and milk and boil until smooth and of the desired thickness. Then gradually add the yolks of eggs and kitchen boquet. This may be served on any vegetable desired.

CREOLE SAUCE

One teaspoonful Kitchen Boquet; one onion; five shallots; two green peppers; one tablespoonful butter; one tablespoonful flour; four large tomatoes; one-half bean garlic; one teaspoonful salt; one teaspoonful sugar; six canned mushrooms; one-half teaspoonful parsley. Slice fine onion, shallots and pepper. Cook in butter to a light brown; stir constantly. Then the garlic minced, and the flour. Stir all together and add tomatoes, seasoning, mushrooms, and parsley. Cook twenty minutes, stirring occasionally. Just before serving, add one teaspoonful Kitchen Boquet.

MUSHROOM SAUCE

Three tablespoonfuls Kitchen Boquet; one-third cupful butter; one-third cupful flour; one teaspoonful salt; dash cayenne; one teaspoonful onion juice; two cupfuls milk; one can mushrooms. Melt the butter, add flour and milk gradually, stirring all the while. When cooked, add the salt, cayenne, onion and kitchen boquet. Drain and chop mushrooms; add to sauce and cook three minutes.

TOMATO CELERY SAUCE

Two teaspoonfuls kitchen boquet; one quart tomatoes; one teaspoonful sugar; three pepper-corns; one tablespoonful butter; one head of celery; one onion; one green pepper; one bay leaf; four cloves; salt and pepper; one tablespoonful flour. Place the tomatoes in a saucepan; add the celery cut up into inch lengths; the onion slices and spices. Simmer slowly for twenty minutes, pass through a sieve; return to the fire, and stew down until you have one cupful of puree. Blend the flour and butter together in a double boiler; stir in the tomato-celery puree, and stir until smooth and thick; season with kitchen boquet, salt and pepper. If too thick, add a little water or stock. This is fine to serve with meat loaf, salmon loaf or rice croquettes, etc.

SAUCE BERNAISE

Heat a granite saucepan slightly and break into it four eggs. Beat the eggs briskly over a slow fire, but do not let them boil; mix four tablespoonfuls hot water and two tablespoonfuls beef extract, and as the eggs begin to cook stir in the mixture, adding the juice of one lemon, one tablespoonful onion juice and one teaspoonful Tarragon vinegar, salt and pepper. When this is well mixed pour on beef-steak and serve.

MINT SAUCE

One bunch mint; one tablespoonful sugar; three-fourths cup vinegar. Rinse the mint in cold water; chop very fine; dissolve the sugar in the vinegar; add the mint; let it stand for one hour to infuse before using. If the same is wanted hot, heat the vinegar and stir in the mint just before using.

SAUCE ALLEMANDE

Mrs. Bertha C. Hansen

Four tablespoonfuls butter; four tablespoonfuls flour; one egg yolk; one cup white stock; one cup cream; one-half teaspoonful salt; few grains pepper. Make same as a thin white sauce. Just before serving, add the yolk of one egg and cook slightly.

HORSE-RADISH DRESSING FOR ROAST BEEF

Mrs. E. D. Gotchy

To a cup of grated horse-radish, add two tablespoonfuls of sugar; one-half teaspoonful salt; one-half cup thick, sweet, cream. Mix the ingredients thoroughly, then add vinegar to taste.



VEGETABLES

"Oh, muckle is the powerful grace That lies in herbs."

A PORTO RICAN DINNER

Mrs. G. W. Plummer

One quart cooked red kidney beans (canned beans are good and save fire); four good sized ripe tomatoes (or the solid tomatoes from a can); four medium sized onions; four green sweet peppers; one-fourth pound nut meats (pecans, almonds or English walnuts are best); two dozen green olives; salt to taste.

Process: If tomatoes are fresh, skin and put in a chopping bowl with onions and peppers, which last should have seeds and white fiber first removed; chop all until about size of a lima bean. Put into skillet a heaping tablespoonful of drippings, from ham or bacon preferred; when hot add chopped vegetables and cook until all are soft and well blended. About fifteen minutes before serving add nut meats and olives cut into strips. In the meantime, heat the beans by themselves; turn all together and cook ten minutes, when it is ready to serve.

Service: Half an hour before time to serve, wash well, enough rice to make a border around your chop platter. Put it into gallopin boiling water, quite heavily salted; water should be at least four times quantity of rice. Boil until barely done; drain in a collander and set to drain in the mouth of the oven for five minutes.

1  2  3  4     Next Part
Home - Random Browse