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The American Missionary—Volume 49, No. 02, February, 1895
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The American Missionary

FEBRUARY, 1895

VOL. XLIX No. 2

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CONTENTS

OUR LIST OF MISSION FIELD WORKERS 33 HOWARD UNIVERSITY—MCINTOSH, GA. 34 FINANCIAL STATEMENT—LINCOLN MEMORIAL DAY 35 LEWIS TAPPAN, WITH PICTURE 36 HON. WILLIAM JACKSON, WITH PICTURE 37 S'KOKOMISH MISSION (Illustrated),—HONORABLE RECORD FOR INDIANS 38 TRIALS OF MISSIONARY LIFE 39

GRAND VIEW, TENN.—GOSPEL TRANSFORMATIONS 40 THE POOR HELPING THE POOREST 41 CHILDREN'S CAUSES FOR THANKFULNESS,—TO HELP HER OWN PEOPLE 43 CONTRASTS OF MISSION CHURCH WORK (Illustrated) 44

GLEAMS OF SUNSHINE IN CHINESE MISSION WORK 46 TRIBUTE TO OUR MISSIONARIES 48

LIST OF OUR FIELD WORKERS 49

RECEIPTS 80

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NEW YORK

PUBLISHED BY THE AMERICAN MISSIONARY ASSOCIATION.

Bible House, Ninth St. and Fourth Ave., New York.

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Price, 50 Cents a Year in advance.

Entered at the Post Office at New York, N. Y., as second-class matter.

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American Missionary Association.

PRESIDENT, MERRILL E. GATES, LL.D., MASS.

Vice-Presidents.

Rev. F. A. NOBLE, D.D., Ill. Rev. ALEX. MCKENZIE, D.D., Mass. Rev. HENRY HOPKINS, D.D., Mo. Rev. HENRY A. STIMSON, D.D., N. Y. Rev. WASHINGTON GLADDEN, D.D., Ohio.

Corresponding Secretaries.

Rev. M. E. STRIEBY, D.D., Bible House, N. Y. Rev. A. F. BEARD, D.D., Bible House, N. Y. Rev. F. P. WOODBURY, D.D., Bible House, N. Y.

Assistant Corresponding Secretary.

Rev. C. J. RYDER, D.D., Bible House, N. Y.

Recording Secretary.

Rev. M. E. STRIEBY, D.D., Bible House, N. Y.

Treasurer.

HENRY W. HUBBARD, Esq., Bible House, N. Y.

Auditors.

PETER McCARTEE. JAMES MITCHELL.

Executive Committee.

CHARLES L. MEAD, Chairman. CHARLES A. HULL, Secretary.

For Three Years.

WILLIAM HAYES WARD, JAMES W. COOPER, LUCIEN C. WARNER, JOSEPH H. TWICHELL, CHARLES P. PEIRCE.

For Two Years.

CHARLES A. HULL, ADDISON P. FOSTER, ALBERT J. LYMAN, NEHEMIAH BOYNTON, A. J. F. BEHRENDS.

For One Year.

SAMUEL HOLMES, SAMUEL S. MARPLES, CHARLES L. MEAD, WILLIAM H. STRONG, ELIJAH HORR.

District Secretaries.

Rev. GEO. H. GUTTERSON, 21 Cong'l House, Boston, Mass. Rev. JOS. E. ROY, D.D., 151 Washington Street, Chicago, Ill. Rev. W. E. C. WRIGHT, D.D., Cong'l Rooms, Y. M. C. A. Building, Cleveland, Ohio.

Secretary of Woman's Bureau.

Miss D. E. EMERSON, Bible House, N. Y.

COMMUNICATIONS

Relating to the work of the Association may be addressed to the Corresponding Secretaries; letters for "THE AMERICAN MISSIONARY," to the Editor, at the New York Office; letters relating to the finances, to the Treasurer; letters relating to woman's work, to the Secretary of the Woman's Bureau.

DONATIONS AND SUBSCRIPTIONS

In drafts, checks, registered letters, or post-office orders, may be sent to H. W. Hubbard, Treasurer, Bible House, New York, or, when more convenient, to either of the Branch Offices, 21 Congregational House, Boston, Mass., 151 Washington Street, Chicago, Ill., or Congregational Rooms, Y. M. C. A. Building, Cleveland, Ohio. A payment of thirty dollars constitutes a Life Member.

NOTICE TO SUBSCRIBERS.—The date on the "address label" indicates the time to which the subscription is paid. Changes are made in date on label to the 10th of each month. If payment of subscription be made afterward the change on the label will appear a month later. Please send early notice of change in post-office address, giving the former address and the new address, in order that our periodicals and occasional papers may be correctly mailed.

FORM OF A BEQUEST.

"I GIVE AND BEQUEATH the sum of —— dollars to the 'American Missionary Association,' incorporated by act of the Legislature of the State of New York." The will should be attested by three witnesses.

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THE AMERICAN MISSIONARY

VOL. XLIX. FEBRUARY, 1895. NO. 2.

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OUR LIST OF MISSION FIELD WORKERS.

We commend to our readers the catalogue of our missionary workers and their stations, in our magazine of this month. Mere names and places have very little interest to the general reader, but a study of this list to one who is interested in mission work, and who has the welfare of his country at heart, will prove to be very suggestive. Some of the larger institutions, schools and churches, are familiar to many, but the greater number probably have never been located by our readers upon the map. There are 243 stations with 617 workers.

Each station represents a great deal of missionary consecration and devoted service for the Master. Could our readers look in upon these workers it would quicken the spirit of their own consecration and benevolence. If they could hear the bell which early calls the students to prayers, and to their studies; if they could unite with those engaged in their morning devotions; if they could listen to the faithful and able instruction of line upon line, and precept upon precept, this list would cease to be a mere catalogue of names and places, and would become alive with history.

Nobly are these missionaries doing their work. Let them have the prayerful sympathy of those whom they represent. Let them feel that their burdens are lightened and their days are brightened because they are remembered by their home churches. Do not forget them when you utter the prayer of our Master, "Thy kingdom come, thy will be done on earth as it is in heaven."

These missionaries, teachers, and ministers, do not ask the compassion of those who remain at home. They are happy in their chosen work. They see the need as it cannot be told. They have a rich reward in the assurance that their lives, which they have invested in this way, are bringing abundant returns.

We call attention also to the supplemental list, which shows the names and residences grouped together side by side. This grouping itself is interesting as showing the nationality of our work. May we not hope that these who have gone out from us shall be spared the anxiety and sorrow which must come by a contraction of their work unless those from whom they have gone shall be able to meet its pecuniary necessities? Will not those to whom these words shall come unite their prayers and contributions with those of the faithful workers at the front, that they may be saved from the disaster of retreat from the work to which they have given their hearts and hands?

MEMORANDUM.—It would be well for those who are interested in the American Missionary Association work to preserve this February magazine, because it contains the catalogue of our workers for the year.

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HOWARD UNIVERSITY, THEOLOGICAL DEPARTMENT.

The Junior class is the best qualified that has entered within the knowledge of the present teachers. The general standard of scholarship steadily advances. The students are very useful in all kinds of church and mission work in the city. Rev. C. H. Butler is doing excellent work in place of his honored father, who was so long connected with us. Dr. Pitzer, of the Southern Presbyterian Church, who was also long our faithful co-worker, gave an eloquent address at our last anniversary, and has just kindly remembered us with a valuable gift to our library. Rev. Mr. Reoch, the new pastor of the Fifth Congregational Church, is doing enthusiastic work in Rev. Mr. Jones' place, and in place of Rev. Mr. Small, Rev. Dr. Little gives our students the benefit of his rich experience as their instructor in pastoral theology.

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McINTOSH, GEORGIA.

PROF. FRED. W. FOSTER.

We are beginning our year's work with much better promise than in any previous year. Our enrollment is a fourth greater now than at the close of October last year, when it was greater than ever before at that time. Our boarding department is also filling up much faster. Better than this is the very marked gain in the tone of the school and in the character of the work done, and the orderliness and studiousness of the pupils. It is cheering to look through the various rooms and note the cheerful diligence with which they are at work. The reverse side of all this is our lack of room, and the great poverty of our people this year, caused by a most unfavorable season. The generosity of our friends at the North can help us meet the latter, and Christian Endeavor Hall would completely remove the former difficulty.

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FINANCIAL STATEMENT.

For the three months ending December 31, 1894, our receipts, as compared with the corresponding months of the previous year, show a slight increase in donations, but a falling off in estates, income and tuition. The last item is sad, but not surprising, for the people in the South are so utterly impoverished that the payment of tuition is well-nigh impossible. On the side of expenditures, as compared with last year, there has been reduction in all items, mission, publication, collecting agency and administration, and yet the balance of indebtedness for the three months is $15,671.10, which, added to the previous indebtedness of $66,360.97, makes a total of $82,032.07. We can only lay these figures before the friends of the poorest and most depressed of the people of our land and invoke such help as patriotism and Christianity will dictate.

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LINCOLN MEMORIAL DAY.

We call the attention of our readers once more to the observance of Lincoln Memorial Day, February 10th being the Sunday nearest the birthday of the Great Emancipator. Last year, in accordance with the recommendation of our annual meeting, the churches interested in our great work were invited to observe the day in commemoration of the emancipation of the slaves in its bearings on the great work which emancipation involved—the preparation of these people for their new life. We regard the renewal of this observance as specially fitting now, because the colored people of the South are passing through a terrible ordeal, and need all the encouragement and help that is possible, to save them from utter discouragement. It is said that the work of this Association is among the agencies most helpful in their elevation. Last year a Concert Exercise was prepared in this office for the use of Sunday-schools, giving a sketch of the life of the Great Emancipator. We have copies remaining, which we will gladly forward when requested to do so. Pastors and school superintendents may vary this exercise by introducing other patriotic addresses or hymns in place of those given.

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LEWIS TAPPAN, ESQ.

Probably the two most unpopular men in New York fifty years ago were Arthur and Lewis Tappan. They were ostracized, ridiculed, slandered, mobbed, and their lives threatened. It is said that the best apples in the orchard are on the tree that has the most clubs under it. If this rule applies to people as well, then the Tappans were very good men. They were honest and prosperous in business; they were sincere and active Christians, giving liberally to all forms of benevolent effort, foreign and home missions, the Bible and Tract Societies, theological and college education, but their one great fault was they were abolitionists—a fault that covered a multitude of their virtues. They were both deeply interested in the American Missionary Association, but Mr. Lewis Tappan was most active in its behalf, and it is of him that we wish to speak.



Lewis Tappan took a prominent part in the organization of some of the missionary societies that preceded the American Missionary Association, and that were finally merged into it. He was very efficient in his activities in securing the organization of the Association, was present at the meeting in Albany, was elected one of its executive board, and its first treasurer. This last office he held for many years, entirely without compensation. He interested himself in every form of its activities, and was a frequent contributor to THE AMERICAN MISSIONARY. A * affixed to many articles shows a portion of his contributions to the early issues of this periodical.

Mr. Tappan was an earnest Christian man and very conscientious in regard to the distribution of his wealth. He wrote two tracts, endeavoring to show that men should not accumulate property to be left to be subject to litigation after death, but that it should be expended during life. Mr. Tappan lived up to his own theory—giving much during life and leaving little at his death.

Mr. Tappan had the gratification of seeing the slaves emancipated and the still greater gratification of aiding with all his strength of brain and purse in fitting them for the responsibilities and privileges of their new life. His was a life worth living.

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HON. WILLIAM JACKSON.



When the American Missionary Association was formed in 1846 it was so unpopular on account of its anti-slavery attitude that it was not easy to find an able and influential man with sufficient courage to accept its presidency. But the man was found. Hon. William Jackson, a citizen of Boston, and an active and successful business man, was so deeply in sympathy with the poor slave that he was willing to assume the position, and all the more because others shrunk from it. Mr. Jackson was a member of the Massachusetts Legislature, and afterward was elected to Congress, and was subsequently reelected for another term by an almost unanimous vote. He was selected by the Liberty Party as its first candidate for Governor of the State of Massachusetts. He was a warm and efficient advocate of the temperance cause. He devoted much of his time and energies to the establishment of railroads in Massachusetts—among others the Boston and Albany, Boston and Worcester, and Providence and Worcester. In various capacities as director or general agent he rendered efficient service in the work of these roads. But the charm of Mr. Jackson's life was its Christian element. At the age of thirty-seven he moved to Newton, Mass., where he spent the remainder of his life. He was actively engaged in the erection of the church edifice and gathering the new church, and was steadfast in his attendance at the prayer meeting, monthly concert, Sunday-school, and other exercises. Advancing years and failing health led him to make a somewhat extended trip through Europe. But life was coming to its end, and it closed with him in deepening interest in the cause of Christ at home and abroad, and in the strongest assurances of a triumphant faith.

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S'KOKOMISH MISSION.

The venerable Dr. Cushing Eells left behind him many mementoes of his remarkable activity in promoting educational and missionary work in Oregon and Washington, on the Pacific coast. Nor with his decease has his good work ceased. Two sons of his have gone forward in similar lines of effort. His son, Major Edwin Eells, was one of the first nominees of the American Missionary Association under General Grant's Peace Policy, and he was renominated by us so long as we were allowed to make nominations, and he has been continued ever since, making a total service of twenty-three years and a half. During this time the Indians have received titles to their lands and have become citizens. His effective hand has been seen in all their improvement. But now we learn that he has been notified that he is soon to be relieved. His removal is said to be due solely to politics. We are sorry for the Indians, and we are ashamed of a Government that will deprive them for partisan purposes of a good agent.

Another son of Dr. Eells, Rev. Myron Eells, was appointed as a missionary at the S'kokomish Agency by the American Board, and when the transfer of missions was made he was continued at the post under the American Missionary Association—a position that he still holds. The subjoined sketch from his pen shows that in point of honesty, in some respects, at least, the Indians surpass their white neighbors.

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HONORABLE RECORD FOR INDIANS.

BY REV. MYRON EELLS, S'KOKOMISH AGENCY, WASHINGTON.

During the late financial stringency the principal business man near this reservation failed, and put his property into the hands of a receiver. The S'kokomish Indians owed him about three thousand dollars, and the whites owed him over twenty thousand. The first business of the receiver was to try to collect these debts. After he had made considerable effort in this direction he said to me substantially as follows: "These Indians have made more honest efforts to pay these debts than the whites have, as a whole."

As the Indians have become citizens they have been required to work road taxes among their other duties. The road supervisor said to me: "I obtained more satisfactory work out of the Indians than I did out of the white men." The Indians had often said that the roads were theirs, and they wanted to use them, so that they were not losing anything, even if they worked a little over their time, and several of them who were over fifty years of age voluntarily gave a day's work or two. While the Indians by no means always do as I wish to have them, yet these facts are encouraging.



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THE TRIALS OF MISSIONARY LIFE.—The hardships and dangers to which our Indian missionaries are exposed are illustrated in the sad experience of Rev. T. L. Riggs, the superintendent of the missions of the Association at Oahe, S. D.

The exposure to the blazing sun and cutting winds and excessive cold of the Dakota winters has produced acute inflammation of the eyes, so that Mr. Riggs is entirely blind. We trust this is only temporary, but the pain and confinement in a dark room, and necessary retirement from the active work which Supt. Riggs so energetically carries on, are a painful trial, and will awaken the sympathy of all our readers.

A sad affliction has also befallen our honored missionary, Dr. A. L. Riggs, and his family, of Santee, Neb. Their little grandson, the child of the missionary daughter in China, has recently died of small-pox under very painful circumstances. The entire family in China had this disease, but at last accounts all but the little child were recovering.

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GRAND VIEW, TENN.

BY SECRETARY RYDER.

I reached Pleasant Hill last Saturday, driving from Grand View. It is of Grand View that I want to report first.

They are in the best condition that I have ever seen. The teachers are doing well, and the new pastor has taken hold most earnestly and successfully.

No one can question the bringing in of the mountain people, both in church and school. More than two-thirds of the pupils are of native families, and the native people are filling the church. Mr. Dorman, the new pastor, has put the second service into the evening again, so as to get more of the mountain folk, and he succeeds. It was a grand thing to get him, coming with so good an education and devoted spirit. The people are feeling happier than for years, and cooperating cordially.

The institute is full. They cannot get on without more room. In the primary grade they enroll sixty-nine, and have seats for twenty-eight. The attendance is fairly well up to the enrollment and they absolutely cannot get on long this way. It is a splendid work. The American Missionary Association has reason to be proud of it, but it seems imperative to have more room.

The work all over this portion of the mountains is thoroughly encouraging.

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GOSPEL TRANSFORMATIONS.

BY A MOUNTAIN PREACHER.

This autumn has been for me a season of hard labor, and, at the same time, one of great rejoicing. For more than a month I have been laboring night and day almost incessantly striving to lead souls to Jesus, and the dear Lord has blessed me to see more than thirty happy conversions. Tired, almost exhausted, still I must press on, for there is yet much to be done.

In the meetings held this fall I have realized more fully than ever before in my life the mighty power of the Spirit, and the blessedness of the religion of the Lord Jesus Christ.

At a place in Scott County, Tenn., where I held a ten days' meeting, this fact of the Holy Spirit's power and the blessedness of the Christian religion was most beautifully illustrated, as the following incident will show.

When I began preaching there the neighborhood was in a universal state of ferment. Fussings, fightings, hard feelings between neighbors were everywhere; and between denominations most bitter prejudice and cruel jealousies. There were men there, close neighbors and kinsfolk, who had not spoken to each other for three years. Some were so angry with each other that they were fighting occasionally and trying to kill each other. They came to church with their pistols in their pockets to shoot each other, and I expected that we might have war in the church yard at any time and men killed. But while they held their thumbs on their pistol hammers I wielded the hammer of God's word with unrelenting force. While they were getting ready to fire revolvers I was firing red hot gospel shot into them with deadly effect. Their hard hearts softened, they weakened, they fell before the sword of the Spirit. Strong men broke down and wept like children. Grasping each other by the hand, embracing each other in their arms amidst a flood of tears, they confessed to each other their faults, and begged pardon and prayed and shouted as I never saw men do before in my life. Hostile enemies were made happy friends, would-be murderers were converted to God, hard feelings among neighbors were swept away, denominational prejudice was forgotten, and brotherly love and Christian peace reigned supreme. And besides this some twenty-five precious souls were saved; among them an old grandmother was brought to Jesus. And still the good work goes on.

Praise the Lord for His wonderful love and for His mighty power which He has manifested in the salvation of precious souls.

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THE POOR HELPING THE POOREST.

A Charming Picture of Self-Sacrifice.

PROFESSOR F. T. WATERS.

The extreme poverty among many of the colored people of Wilmington, N. C., led me to think that there would be many families that would have no Christmas gifts unless given by those who could spare, even from their scant living, a portion to be given to those wholly destitute. Accordingly I invited the children in all the rooms in Gregory Institute to bring such offerings as they were willing to make, to be afterward distributed to those who otherwise would have no Christmas and were without the necessities of life even. The idea seemed to meet with general approval among teachers and pupils. Friday, the last day before the Christmas vacation, was appointed to bring in the gifts, and the amount contributed wholly exceeded our most extravagant hopes. Shortly after 8 o'clock the school children began to arrive laden with gifts, consisting of almost every imaginable article that could be used. Some brought a sweet potato—always the largest they could find—others a pound of sugar, rice, flour, bacon, pork, beans, peas, corn meal, cabbages, turnips, tea, coffee, matches, apples, oranges, grits, and if there are any other things to be found among eatables I think I can produce them from the packages now deposited in the sewing room.

Besides this quite a quantity of wood was brought, and a good supply—several bundles, at least—of fat pine for lighters, and considerable clothing. One special gift I must mention. It was from a little girl in the primary class. The girl is about eleven or twelve years old, and very poor. She worked all last summer and saved her money to pay her tuition in our school this year, and, as I have learned, had secured nearly enough to pay her tuition during the year. But, alas, poor little Mary. For some reason, probably to get the food necessary to live, her mother was obliged to take her hard earned and slowly accumulated money, and before school began she found that what she had so long hoped and planned for she could not realize. However, she did not give up her cherished plan of coming to school, but worked away, got her some clothes, and about the first of November presented herself as wishing to come to school. She brought all the money she had left, ten cents, and said if I would only let her come she was sure she could pay the rest before long. I kept track of her and found from her teacher that the poor girl could not obtain anything further for her tuition, but that she was a very promising girl, so I have let her come, and I have prayed that some one may be led to contribute $8 for her tuition. But what surprised me most was the Christmas offering this child made. Just before school called, she came tugging two large sticks of wood, the combined weight being twenty pounds. This she had got cut into two pieces and had carried it more than a mile in order that some one poorer than she might be blessed at Christmas time. This little incident made me feel that I had never known sacrifice before—for here was one who often goes hungry to bed, without any of the comforts of life, yet to make others happy gave literally "all she had." Truly were the blessed Lord here His words regarding the poor widow must have been repeated. I feel that the wood she brought is almost too sacred to be put to common use. I would that a piece of it were in every Christian home to teach the lesson of true sacrifice.

On Christmas morning a dozen homes will be made happy by these humble gifts. One old lady in our visits we found so destitute that she had tasted nothing from Saturday night till Tuesday, when one of the girls of Gregory school took her in her breakfast. The old lady telling about it said she knew the Lord would not let her starve. The teachers have voluntarily taxed themselves ten cents a month, which provides for her food at least. I need not multiply these cases. Many sacrifices in kind, if not in degree, could be mentioned equal to that of little Mary, and many cases of need as extreme as that of "Aunt Maggie." The scanty purses of the A. M. A. teachers, many of whom, as in my own case, are obliged to economize in every way to keep our own families from actual want, are inadequate to meet the demand, and why should we multiply their cases on our minds when we are powerless to help?

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CHILDREN'S CAUSES FOR THANKFULNESS.

MISS LILLIAN L. GOAR, BLOWING ROCK, N. C.

Dear Friends: I want to tell you of our Junior Thanksgiving service last Wednesday eve. The meeting was led by a Junior. After prayer by one of the members the leader asked of each one: "What have you to be thankful for?" We had so many blessings given that a large blackboard was covered, with reports of the many "thankfulnesses." The following are a few of the many: "For Christ most of all," "the Holy Bible," "health," "warm sunshine," "blue sky," "I don't know of anything I'm not thankful for," "for plenty of everything, bread and fruit and everything to eat," "for forgiveness," "Junior meetings," "to bring wood and water for our mothers and fathers." One of the several four-year-olds in school was thankful for a "stove, love (for) our brothers, to play, eatin' an' things to cook it in."

And this same little boy, who comes from a home anything but attractive, had this sentence in his prayer, "thankful for home." Another dear Junior was thankful for good times and "for my little sister an' father an' mother." "The privilege to go to school" was another cause of thankfulness, while many times, both in prayer and speaking, was "the dear teacher" mentioned.

The prayers were earnest, simple and sincere, and I felt much nearer heaven after the little ones had gone from their childish meeting. And I felt more than ever before the divine presence with us. The Juniors carry their Christian ideas into everything. In school one day I asked "What is the heart for?" And a little girl (a Junior) replied quickly "To let Jesus come in."

As the hoped-for advancement lies with the children, I feel that the work is very encouraging.

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TO HELP HER OWN PEOPLE.—A minister in a Northern State sends to us a check for $500, which he says is the gift of a colored lady of over seventy years of age, to aid in the education of her people in the South. She has $500 more, which she retained for the present in view of emergencies, but which she intends ultimately to give to the Association for the same purpose. The minister says she is intelligent, a diligent reader, and an interesting person to meet. She has been a tailoress and probably has earned most of her money with her needle. Such a person is an honor to her race and to the church of Christ.

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CONTRASTS OF MISSION CHURCH WORK.

BY SEC. F. P. WOODBURY.

Our mission churches of the South reach different classes of people. Some are in the large cities, others in populous towns, others in smaller country villages, and still others in entirely rural districts among the plantations. The methods of these churches vary as widely as their location. Some of them take advantage of institutional methods of church work in all their various forms of Christian service. Many churches which do not undertake so large a distribution of effort still have their circles of King's Sons and Daughters, missionary societies, and, almost everywhere, their Christian Endeavor Societies. Many of the smaller churches have day schools closely associated with the congregation, sometimes under the conduct of the pastor or his wife, or both.



Among our more prominent churches is the Howard Chapel, of Nashville, Tenn., a picture of which, with the new parsonage, is found on this page. This church is located on the original site of Fisk University, and was formerly the chapel of the University. The building is a commodious brick structure. The church has had many fluctuations in its membership and condition, but under its present pastor, Rev. J. E. Moorland, formerly Y. M. C. A. secretary at Washington, D. C., it has taken on new life and vigor. The membership has rapidly grown. All the various forms of Christian activity are thoroughly organized, and the pastor has commended himself not only to the members of the church and congregation, but to the residents of all that portion of the city. Lately the congregation took up the question of affording their pastor a parsonage, and have built a neat and comfortable structure at the side of the church, which they are now making payment for from their own means.



In strong contrast with this city church work is the McElderry Mission, formed and carried on by Rev. J. M. Roan, of Ironaton, Ala. Mr. Roan, like many other pastors, was anxious that his church should take hold of aggressive Christian work, and formed a mission at some distance from the church, out among the plantations. His young men took hold vigorously with him in the new work and put up the log cabin chapel, which is shown in the accompanying illustration. It is an interesting indication of their Christian consecration that the members of this mission church were so desirous to take hold themselves of mission work among those of their people still less favored than they. Mr. Roan says that they are proud of their little log cabin mission, and that its congregation has steadily increased. There are now nine Congregational members living near the mission. Of late there has been quite a desire on the part of many to build a church in place of the mission cabin, and the people are already beginning to raise means for this purpose. A flourishing Sunday-school is carried on in connection with this mission work.

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GLEAMS OF SUNSHINE.

BY REV. W. C. POND, D.D.

The new year of our Chinese Mission opened cloudily. We had passed through three months of close and anxious questioning about ways and means; most of the teachers and helpers had received no salary for from one to three months. Hard times had been crowding our Chinese out of employment. Families in which they had served felt compelled to do without them. They were moving to and fro with less inclination to study, or, possibly, to listen to the word of life, than in the days when plenty of hard work left them weary in frame, but not heartsore.

At any rate—for these reasons or for others—the reports for September were, on the whole, less cheering, I think, than any I had ever received; but now, with the October reports all at hand, we find the clouds breaking away and have "sunshine in our souls."

The membership of the schools was larger by 33 and the average attendance by 17, but the gleams that bring best cheer are such as these:

From Chin Foy, in Sacramento: "Eight names have been signed to pledge cards for the Christian Endeavor members. Hope this society will be established before long. Four new members have united with our Association [thus professing faith in Christ and full consecration to Him. W. C. P.], and three brethren expect to be baptized by Dr. Hoyt and to unite with the church next communion. Thank God for His blessing. The work is encouraging lately." This brother, whose name may be familiar to the constant and attentive readers of THE MISSIONARY, and who has been for ten years or more one of our most useful helpers, instructs me to reduce his scanty salary two-thirds (from $30 to $10 per month), and will try to make up what is lacking by other work, so that with our reduced resources our work may not be hindered.

Loo Quong writes from Fresno concerning a sick brother who was converted in China, and has never been identified with any of our missions: "Miss Beaton [the teacher] found him sick on the street and asked him to come and live in the mission, in God's name. No one dared to speak for him to help him in any way whatever, outside our mission. I asked him, at length, after he had been with us many months, if he would like to go back home. He says it would be the best way. Thus far I succeeded in taking up subscriptions for his passage. [There are $45.30 outside of Fresno, and $28 which was taken up here.] The Christian Endeavor of the Congregational Church, through Rev. J. H. Collins, their pastor, gave him passage from here to San Francisco. It was a kind act of them all. I think God has blessed us all by enabling us to have this thing done so well in His name, because Mr. Lai Fat [the beneficiary] is not a member of the Association, nor have any of us known him before. May God send him to his family all right, and may his family be blessed through his return to them, and may the Lord spare him many days with his family in order to lead them to Christ!" Surely there is a gleam of sunshine in this act of Christian love. All, or nearly all, our missions joined in it. It is really no unusual thing with us.

Miss Bradley, of Ventura, writes: "As soon as Yong Kay came [who divides his time as helper between the two neighboring missions of Santa Barbara and Ventura] he began measures to revive our C. E. Society, and now we have one of twelve members. Its meeting are held on Friday evening, commencing about 9 o clock, and continuing indefinitely. It is wonderful how they seem to realize the meaning of the pledge and keep true to it. There is no lagging; no 'awful pauses.' About two weeks ago they began preparations for a Christian Endeavor social. Invitations were sent out to all the ministers and other Christians specially interested in missions. More than fifty assembled and listened to the programme, which lasted about an hour. Yong Kay's address was very fine; his use of Scripture was so apt, and his illustrations so good, Yong Wo Quon, a good, earnest Christian, will join the church next Sunday morning. I am satisfied that he understands the step he is taking, and that he will be a great help to us."

In like manner from Santa Cruz comes this word: "I am most happy to write that the Chinese I asked you to pray for has joined the Association and is very happy in our Christian work. Let us continue to pray for two others who are holding back, but are 'almost persuaded,'" and from Joe Dun, in our new mission at Watsonville, this: "We do thank the Lord for His choosing and saving souls. Tuesday evening of last week one of the associate members [i.e., of the new C. E. society] became active. Last night we have meeting, and he rose and gave testimony. Said he: 'I am glad to-night, for I believed in Jesus Christ, and He will save my soul.'"

But my space is more than filled. We rejoice and take courage.

* * * * *

TRIBUTE TO OUR MISSIONARIES.

Apropos of the roll of our missionaries and teachers we quote an eloquent tribute from one of the children of the American Missionary Association who is now the strong pastor of a strong church in the South. He alludes to a teacher who had devoted many years of her life to our missionary work and had brought to it a sweetness of spirit and devotion that had won the confidence and inspired the zeal of those for whom she labored. We quote:

"The work which these teachers did was the result of no small sacrifice. For a woman to leave her Northern home of comfort and refinement to come South to engage in such a work and all that it implies was not a popular thing even at the North, but in spite of unpopularity at the North and unworthy treatment at the South, these self-exiled men and women wrought wonderfully. They proved the best friends that the black man has ever had. In the school they showed us the light of letters, which had never before dawned upon us. In the church they showed us the Light of the world, which was strangely dim in our souls. In the shop they showed us the light of life about us, of which we were densely ignorant. Thoughtful minds, skillful hands, enlightened hearts—this is the heritage they brought us.

"Throughout the length and breadth of the Southland there are such women among us working in a humble way. The work done by these moral heroes and heroines is work in the shade, but one day, when the sunlight of God's justice shall shine upon it, as it surely will, men will see it and admire it. For these friends we are devoutly grateful. Deep down in our hearts, too deep in many cases for tears, lies the feeling of whole-souled gratitude for these moral heroes and heroines. The half has never been told. We thank God for those who left home and went to the war to die, if need be, that the slave might be free. But we thank God equally for those brave men and braver women who, before the smoke of battle cleared away, came South, and, with the spelling book in one hand and God's holy word in the other, set the millions of freedmen on the way toward reading, reasoning and righteousness. Around God's throne may their crowns of life eternal glitter with the penitential tears of a grateful people redeemed unto a common Father by their prayers, their tears, their lives!"

* * * * *

Our last Annual Report is printed, and will be sent to those making application for it to this office.

* * * * *

THE FIELD.

1894-1895.

The following list gives the names of those who are in the work of the Churches, Institutions and Schools of the American Missionary Association.

THE SOUTH.

Rev. G. S. Dickerman, Field Superintendent. " George W. Moore, Field Missionary. Mr. E. E. McKibban, Builder. " Gilbert Walton, General Mountain Missionary.

WASHINGTON, D. C.

THEOLOGICAL DEPARTMENT, HOWARD UNIVERSITY.

Rev. J. E. Rankin, D.D., LL.D., Washington, D. C. " J. L. Ewell, A.M., Washington, D. C. " Isaac Clark, A.M., Washington, D. C. " George O. Little, D.D., Washington, D. C. " Sterling N. Brown, A.M., Washington, D. C. " Charles H. Butler, Washington, D. C. " Adam Reoch, A.B., Washington, D. C. " Teunis S. Hamlin, D.D., Washington, D. C. " John T. Jenifer, Washington, D. C. " Eugene Johnson, Washington, D. C. Prof. Wm. J. Stephens, Washington, D. C. Mr. Clement L. Brumbaugh, Washington, D. C.

WASHINGTON (LINCOLN MEMORIAL CHURCH). 1701 11th St., N. W.

Pastor and Missionary, Rev. E. A. Johnson, Washington, D. C. Mrs. E. A. Johnson, Washington, D. C.

WASHINGTON (PLYMOUTH CHURCH).

Minister, Rev. S. N. Brown, Washington, D. C.

VIRGINIA.

CAPPAHOSIC.

GLOUCESTER HIGH AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL.

Principal.—Prof. W. B. Weaver, Cappahosic, Va. Mrs. A. B. Weaver, Cappahosic, Va. Miss Lizzie Baytop, Ark, Va. " Carrie E. Steele, Charleston, S. C. " Estelle I. Sprague, Takoma Park, D. C. Mr. D. D. Weaver, Cappahosic, Va. " J. H. Lockley, Cappahosic, Va.

NORTH CAROLINA.

WILMINGTON.

Minister, Rev. Frank W. Sims, Aberdeen, Miss.

GREGORY INSTITUTE (613 Nun Street).

Principal.—Prof. F. T. Waters, A.M., Oberlin, O. Miss Jennie L. Blowers, Westfield, N. Y. " Susan M. Marsh, E. Northfield, Mass. Mrs. Virginia C. Logie, St. Louis, Mo. Miss Georgia M. Belyea, Ashland, N. B. " Stella M. Hopkinson, Oberlin, O. " Minnie T. Strout, Salem, Mass. " Katharine M. Jacobs, S. Hadley Falls, Mass. " Mary L. Thompson, Rouse's Point, N. Y. " Emma J. Bryce, Springfield, Ont. Mrs. Lucy M. Mellen, Oberlin, O.

BEAUFORT.

Minister, Rev. J. P. Sims, Talladega, Ala.

WASHBURN SEMINARY.

Principal.—Prof. Fred. S. Hitchcock, Cambridgeport, Mass. Mrs. Fred. S. Hitchcock, Cambridgeport, Mass. Miss Ella Louise Cheney, Oberlin, O. " Anna M. Cooper, Boalsburg, Pa. " Lilla L. Johnson, Sherburne, Vt.

DUDLEY.

Minister, Rev. S. P. Smith, Chicago, Ill.

RALEIGH.

Minister and General Missionary, Rev. A. W. Curtis, D.D., Crete, Neb.

OAKS, CEDAR CLIFF, AND MELVILLE.

Minister and Missionary, Rev. Anthony Peden, Oaks, N. C.

Teacher at Oaks, Miss E. W. Douglass, Decorah, Iowa.

Teacher at Cedar Cliff, Mr. Wm. R. Hall, Raleigh, N. C.

Teacher at Melville, Miss Jennie S. Irwin, Raleigh, N. C.

McLEANSVILLE.

Minister, Rev. S. S. Sevier, McLeansville, N. C.

Teachers at McLeansville, Mrs. Elizabeth Smith, McLeansville, N. C. " S. S. Sevier, McLeansville, N. C.

HILLSBORO.

Teachers, Miss Bessie C. Bechan, Toronto, Canada. " Julia H. Curtis, Syracuse, N. Y.

MALEE.

Teacher, Mr. Solomon A. Stanford, Oaks, N. C.

STRIEBY, SALEM AND HIGH POINT.

Minister, Rev. Z. Simmons, Strieby, N. C.

Teacher at Strieby, Mr. H. R. Walden, Strieby, N. C.

Special Missionary, High Point, Miss A. E. Farrington, Portland, Me.

TROY, PEKIN, DRY CREEK AND NALLS.

Minister, Rev. C. C. Collins, Newark, N. J.

Teachers at Troy, Miss Evelyn Segsworth, Toronto, Canada. " Laura G. Segsworth, Toronto, Canada.

Teacher at Pekin, Mr. Columbus Green, Pekin, N. C.

Teacher at Dry Creek, Mrs. Kate J. P. Green, Dry Creek, N. C.

Teacher at Nalls, Mr. R. H. Saunders, Nalls, N. C.

CARTER'S MILLS.

Teacher and Preacher, Mr. W. D. Newkirk, Carter's Mills, N. C.

ALL HEALING (King's Mountain P. O.).

LINCOLN ACADEMY.

Principal.—Miss Lillian S. Cathcart, Minneapolis, Minn. Miss May E. Newton, Springfield, Mo. " Susie T. Cathcart, Tangerine, Fla. " Nellie D. Cooley, North Amherst, Mass. " Isadore M. Caughey, North Kingsville, Ohio.

BLOWING ROCK.

SKYLAND INSTITUTE.

Principal.—Miss F. Annette Jackson, Hudsonville, Tenn. Miss Agnes Ruth Mitchell, Acworth, N. H. " Lillian Lavinia Goar, Montevideo, Minn. " N. S. Dennis, Salem, Mich.

SALUDA.

Pioneer Evangelist, Rev. E. W. Hollies, Topeka, Kan.

SALUDA SEMINARY. Principal.—Miss Mary C. Phelps, Ph.B., Nova, Ohio. Miss Hattie M. Fairchild, Frankfort, Mich. " Minnie A. Hollies, Topeka, Kan. Rev. E. W. Hollies, Topeka, Kan. Mrs. S. Hollies, Topeka, Kan.

WHITTIER.

Minister, Rev. Robert Humphrey, Whittier, N. C.

Teachers, Rev. Robert Humphrey, Whittier, N. C. Mrs. Olive A. Humphrey, Whittier, N. C.

VALDESE (MORGANTON).

Minister, Rev. Enrico Vinay, Valdese, N. C.

Teachers, Mr. M. A. Jahier, Valdese, N. C. " Antoine Grill, Valdese, N. C.

BREVARD, DUNN'S CREEK, GOLDEN VALLEY AND ISLAND CREEK.

Minister, Rev. W. A. Hamet, Brevard, N. C.

HENRIETTA, McCLURD'S, MOORHEAD AND PRIM'S GROVE.

Minister, Rev. L. C. White, Mooresboro, N. C.

SOUTH CAROLINA.

CHARLESTON.

Minister, Rev. George C. Rowe, Charleston, S. C.

AVERY NORMAL INSTITUTE (57, 59 Bull Street).

Principal.—Prof. Morrison A. Holmes, Lee, Mass. Miss Maude L. Barnum, Oberlin, Ohio. " Mary T. Richardson, B.A., Chicago, Ill. " Maude A. Robinson, Battle Creek, Mich. Mr. Edward A. Lawrence, Charleston, S. C. Miss Mary L. Deas, Charleston, S. C. " Marion R. Birnie, Charleston, S. C. " Lora D. Tanner, Grand Ledge, Mich. Mrs. M. A. Holmes, Lee, Mass.

GREENWOOD.

Minister, Rev. J. M. Robinson, Detroit, Mich.

BREWER NORMAL SCHOOL.

Principal.—Rev. J. M. Robinson, Detroit, Mich. Mrs. J. M. Robinson, Detroit, Mich. Miss Julia P. Seymour, Rootstown, Ohio. " Julia R. Mitchell, Utica, N. Y. " Clara S. Boyd, Greenfield, Ohio. " Harriet E. Bell, Brecksville, Ohio. " Marie E. Hoover, Rushville, N. Y. " Jennie M. Street, Detroit, Mich. " Alice A. Holmes, Lansing, Mich.

COLUMBIA.

Minister, Rev. E. H. Wilson, Columbia, S. C.

GEORGIA.

ATLANTA.

[A]FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH.

Minister, Rev. H. H. Proctor, Nashville, Tenn.

STORRS SCHOOL (120 Houston St.).

Principal.—Miss Ella E. Roper, Worcester, Mass. Miss Julia A. Condict, Adrian, Mich. " Carrie E. Tambling, Oberlin, Ohio. " Alice A. Clarke, North Hannibal, N. Y. " A. Laura Humphries, Marathon, Iowa. " Nina B. Mosher, Painesville, Ohio. Mrs. A. S. Webber, Worcester, Mass.

[A] This church is self-supporting.

MACON.

Minister, Rev. John R. McLean, Macon, Ga.

BALLARD NORMAL SCHOOL (806 Pine St.). Principal.—Prof. Geo. C. Burrage, A.B., Worcester, Mass. Miss Eva F. Chesley, E. Harrington, N. H. Mrs. John Orr, Olivet, Mich. Miss E. B. Scobie, Everett, Ohio. " Ruth M. French, Hudson, Ohio. " Carrie E. Browne, West Bloomfield, N. Y. " Lucy E. Fairbanks, Woodstock, Vt. " Anna M. Woodruff, Rose View, N. Y. " M. R. Ruckman, La Porte, Indiana. " Helen Hanson, Stoneham, Mass. " Clara A. Dole, Parkman, Ohio. " Kate L. Snow, Fredonia, N. Y. Mr. John Orr, Olivet, Mich.

SAVANNAH.

Minister, [B]Rev. L. B. Maxwell, Savannah, Ga.

BEACH INSTITUTE (30 Harris St.).

Principal.—Miss Julia B. Ford, Morristown, N. J. Miss Ada Louise Wilcox, Monroe, Mich. " May Belle Nicholson, Kalamazoo, Mich. " L. J. Hanscom, Winthrop, Maine. " Julia E. McMillan, Oberlin, O. " Nellie J. Arnott, Nashua, Iowa. " L. C. Holman, Vincennes, Iowa.

[B] This church is self-supporting.

THOMASVILLE.

Minister and Missionary, Rev. Chas. F. Sargent, Thomasville, Ga.

ALLEN NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL.

Principal.—Miss A. Merriam, Westboro, Mass. Miss C. M. Dox, Kalamazoo, Mich. " Edna Harris, Huron, Ohio. " Nellie D. Sheldon, New York City. " B. R. Parmenter, Rockford, Iowa. " Frances M. Williams, Orange, N. J. " Minerva A. Kinney, Whitewater, Wis. Mr. H. C. Sargent, Thomasville, Ga.

McINTOSH.

Minister, Rev. R. B. Johns, Reading, Pa.

DORCHESTER ACADEMY.

Principal.—Prof. Fred. W. Foster, Castine, Me. Miss Charlotte J. Knowlton, Creston, Ohio. " Jennie Curtis, Housatonic, Mass. " S. Josephine Scott, Hamilton, Ohio. " Emma J. Rosecrans, Hammond, Ohio. " Nellie I. Reed, Oberlin, Ohio. " Carrie E. Leadbetter, Pulpit Harbor, Me. " Harriet E. Leach, Norwich, Conn. Mrs. Mary W. Foster, Castine, Me. Mr. B. F. Perkins, Castine, Me.

CYPRESS SLASH. (P. O. McIntosh.)

Minister, Rev. J. A. Jones, Talladega, Ala.

MILLER'S STATION.

Minister, Rev. Wilson Callen, Savannah, Ga.

ATHENS.

Minister, Rev. Paul L. La Cour, Athens, Ga.

KNOX INSTITUTE.

Principal.—Prof. L. S. Clark, Athens, Ga. Miss Emma S. Morton, Athens, Ga. " Eliza B. Twiggs, Athens, Ga. Mrs. P. L. La Cour, Athens, Ga.

MARSHALLVILLE.

Teachers, Mrs. A. W. Richardson, Marshallville, Ga. Miss L. J. Blackmore, Woodville, Miss. " A. R. Magrath, Charleston, S. C.

WOODVILLE. (P. O. Savannah.)

Minister and Teacher, Rev. J. H. H. Sengstacke, Savannah, Ga. Mr. J. Loyd, Savannah, Ga.

MARIETTA.

Minister and Teacher, Rev. Calvin Lane, Marietta, Ga. Mrs. Calvin Lane, Marietta, Ga.

CUTHBERT.

Teachers, Mr. F. H. Henderson, Cuthbert, Ga. Mrs. F. H. Henderson, Cuthbert, Ga.

ALBANY.

ALBANY NORMAL SCHOOL.

Principal.—Prof. Thos. S. Inborden, Oberlin, Ohio. Mr. Isadore Martin, Charleston, S. C. Mrs. Alice Davis, Oberlin, Ohio. Miss Lincolnia C. Haynes, Macon, Ga.

BAINBRIDGE.

WHITTIER SCHOOL.

Teacher, Mr. A. W. Bowman, Bainbridge, Ga.

RUTLAND AND BYRON.

Minister, Rev. H. T. Johnson, Newburgh, N. Y.

Teacher at Rutland, Mrs. E. S. Johnson, Newburgh, N. Y.

ANDERSONVILLE.

Teachers, Miss —— —— " —— ——

FLORIDA.

ORANGE PARK.

Minister, Rev. T. S. Perry, Limerick, Me.

NORMAL SCHOOL.

Principal.—Prof. B. D. Rowlee, Fulton, N. Y. Miss Edith M. Robinson, Battle Creek, Mich. " Helen S. Loveland, Newark Valley, N. Y. " Margaret A. Ball, Orange Park, Fla. " Carrie E. Bishop, New Haven, Conn. " Mary E. Sands, Saco, Maine. " Harriet M. Smith, Hartington, Neb. Mrs. Julia E. Rowlee, Fulton, N. Y. " Julia E. Titus, Moravia, N. Y. Mr. Otis S. Dickinson, Granville, Mass.

MARTIN.

Principal.—Miss Mattie J. Brydie, Athens, Ga. Miss Sarah L. Hunt, Sparta, Ga. " Mary A. McClelland, Nashville, Tenn.

ALABAMA.

TALLADEGA.

Minister, Rev. Spencer Snell, Talladega, Ala.

TALLADEGA COLLEGE.

President.—Rev. H. S. De Forest, D.D., Talladega, Ala. Rev. Geo. W. Andrews, D.D., Talladega, Ala. Prof. William E. Hutchison, Talladega, Ala. " Martin Lovering, A.B., Tuckahoe, N. Y. " Edwin C. Silsby, Talladega, Ala. Mr. Edgar A. Bishop, B.S., Talladega, Ala. " George Williamson, Talladega, Ala. Prof. Herbert F. Burrage, B.S., Worcester, Mass. Miss J. A. Ainsworth, Hyde Park, Mass. " Etta M. Hitchcock, Lewis, N. Y. " Emma F. King, Elmhurst, Ill. " Harriet Towne, Langdon, N. H. " Caroline E. Frost, Methuen, Mass. " Harriet E. White, Olivet, Mich. " Justia C. Hoy, Bellefonte, Pa. " Ada J. Ringheim, Nevada, Iowa. " Louie Savery, Talladega, Ala. " Susan Sands, Belmont, Iowa. " Clara E. Noble, Valparaiso, Ind. " Ruth K. Kingsley, Syracuse, N. Y. " A. B. Chalfant, Lebanon, S. D. " L. A. Pingree, Denmark, Me. Mrs. A. E. Foote, Omaha, Neb.

MARION.

Minister, Rev. W. J. Larkin, Marion, Ala.

LINCOLN NORMAL SCHOOL.

Principal.—Miss M. E. Wilcox, Benson, Minn. Miss Edna M. Heald, Nashua, Iowa. " Lillian J. Beecroft, Madison, Wis. " Minnie M. Gates, Phoenix, N. Y. " Mary D. Hyde, Mazeppa, Minn. " Ida C. Chapin, Gasport, N. Y. Mrs. W. J. Larkin, Marion, Ala.

MONTGOMERY.

Minister, Rev. J. S. Jackson, Montgomery, Ala.

ALCO.

Minister, Rev. J. J. Scott, Alco, Ala.

ATHENS.

Minister, Rev. Marion S. Jones, Tougaloo, Miss.

TRINITY SCHOOL.

Teachers, Miss Mary E. McLane, New Haven, Conn. Mrs. H. S. Williams, Athens, Ala. Miss L. E. Woodruff, Sheffield, Ohio. " Mary E. Perkins, Norwich, Conn.

SELMA.

Minister, Rev. A. T. Burnell, Denver, Col.

BURRELL SCHOOL (366 Selma St.).

Principal.—Rev. A. T. Burnell, Ph.D., Denver, Col. Mrs. Mary A. Burnell, Denver, Col. Miss Edith M. Thatcher, Oberlin, Ohio. " Myra J. Lamb, Ladoga, Wis. " Helen M. Hyde, Sandy Hill, N. Y. Mr. James A. Merriman, Selma, Ala. Mrs. N. D. Merriman, Selma, Ala. " Mary A. Dillard, Selma, Ala.

KYMULGA.

Minister, Rev. Z. Jones, Talladega, Ala.

LAWSONVILLE AND COVE.

Minister, Rev. M. L. Baldwin, Talladega, Ala.

SYLACAUGA.

Minister, Rev. J. I. Donaldson, Talladega, Ala.

JENIFER.

Minister, Rev. J. B. Grant, Talladega, Ala.

IRONATON.

Minister and Teacher, Rev. J. M. Roan, Talladega, Ala. Mrs. J. M. Roan, Talladega, Ala.

SHELBY IRON WORKS.

Minister, Rev. A. Simmons, Shelby, Ala.

CHILDERSBURG.

Minister, Rev. W. P. Hamilton, Talladega, Ala.

ANNISTON AND FORT PAYNE.

Minister, Rev. James Brown, Anniston, Ala.

GADSDEN.

Minister, Rev. J. R. Sims, Talladega, Ala.

BIRMINGHAM.

Minister, Rev. J. L. Cole, Birmingham, Ala.

NEW DECATUR.

Minister, Rev. —— ——

NAT (BENDING OAKS).

GREEN ACADEMY.

Principal.—Prof. H. E. Sargent, Clearwater, Minn. Mrs. H. E. Sargent, Clearwater, Minn. Miss Edith M. Hatfield, Charlestown, Ohio. " Libbie A. Hatfield, Charlestown, Ohio. " Edith E. Lamb, Ladoga, Wis.

FLORENCE.

Minister, Rev. William L. Johnson, Florence, Ala.

CARPENTER HIGH SCHOOL.

Teachers, Rev. William L. Johnson, Florence, Ala. Miss Mary Lucy Corpier, Florence, Ala.

COTTON VALLEY (P. O. Fort Davis).

COTTON VALLEY SCHOOL.

Principal.—Miss Lilla V. Davis, Boston, Mass. Miss Hattie A. DeJarnette, Montgomery, Ala. " Corrie N. Johnson, Oberlin, Ohio.

BLOCTON AND BELLE SUMPTER.

Minister, Rev. D. M. Lewis, Blocton, Ala.

TENNESSEE.

NASHVILLE.

Minister, Rev. Chas. W. Dunn, Nashville, Tenn.

FISK UNIVERSITY.

President.—Rev. E. M. Cravath, D.D., Nashville, Tenn. Rev. A. K. Spence, A.M., Nashville, Tenn. " F. A. Chase, A.M., Nashville, Tenn. " E. C. Stickel, A.M., Nashville, Tenn. Prof. Charles W. Dunn, A.M., B.D., Nashville, Tenn. Rev. Eugene Harris, A.M., B.D., Nashville, Tenn. Prof. H. C. Morgan, A.M., Nashville, Tenn. " H. H. Wright, A.M., Nashville, Tenn. Miss Anna T. Ballantine, Nashville, Tenn. " Dora A. Scribner, B.A., Gossville, N. H. " Emma L. Parsons, M.A., Le Roy, N. Y. " Mary A. Spence, M.A., Nashville, Tenn. " Mary A. Bye, B.S., Minneapolis, Minn. " M. Antoinette Kellogg, Elmira, N. Y. " Alice M. Garsden, Westmoreland, N. Y. " Caroline Wandell, Phoenix, N. Y. " Alice L. Walker, Ph.B., Grinnell, Iowa. " Nellie F. Comings, St. Paul, Minn. " Miriam E. Carey, Freeport, Ill. " Emily R. Bishop, Keene, N. H. Mrs. Lucy R. Greene, Amherst, Mass. Miss Jennie A. Robinson, Nashville, Tenn. " Mary E. Chamberlain, Nashville, Tenn. Mrs. Luretta C. Stickel, B.L., Nashville, Tenn. Miss Alice M. Grass, Bryan, O. " Frances L. Yeomans, Danville, Ill. Mrs. W. D. McFarland, Granby, Conn. Miss Frances M. Andrews, Milltown, N. B. " Susan A. Cooley, Bavaria, Kan. Mrs. Alice M. Brown, Rochester, N. Y.

NASHVILLE (HOWARD CHURCH).

Minister, Rev. J. E. Moorland, Nashville, Tenn.

NASHVILLE (THIRD CHURCH, JACKSON STREET).

Minister, Rev. E. E. Scott, Nashville, Tenn.

GOODLETTSVILLE.

Minister, [Supplied from Fisk Theological Seminary.]

MEMPHIS.

Minister, [C]Rev. George V. Clark, Atlanta, Ga.

LE MOYNE INSTITUTE (294 Orleans St.).

Principal.—Prof. Andrew J. Steele, A.M., Whitewater, Wis. Miss Esther A. Barnes, Tallmadge, O. " Luella Waring, Kalamazoo, Mich. " Ella A. Hamilton, Whitewater, Wis. " Celestia S. Goldsmith, Chester, N. H. " Mary W. Bryant, Dell Rapids, S. Dak. " Nellie Bishop, Palmyra, Wis. " Emma O. Kennedy, Memphis, Tenn. " Cornelia E. Lewis, Memphis, Tenn. " Mary E. Johnson, Bailey, Tenn. " Mary E. Brereton, Acorn, Wis. " Mary E. Simonds, Hartland, Wis. Mrs. M. L. Jenkins, Chautauqua, N. Y. " B. C. Brown, Downer's Grove, Ill. Mr. Elias S. Webb, Memphis, Tenn. " O. R. Brown, Downer's Grove, Ill.

[C] This church is self supporting.

JONESBORO.

Minister, Rev. Sandy A. Paris, Brookfield Centre, Conn.

WARNER INSTITUTE.

Principal.—Miss Anna R. Miner, Lyme, Conn. Miss Alice M. Whitsey, Dover, Ohio. " Gertrude Harnar, Xenia, Ohio. " Belle F. Burr, Toronto, Canada. " Mary D. Backenstoe, Evansville, Wis.

KNOXVILLE.

Minister, Rev. B. A. Imes, Knoxville, Tenn.

SLATER TRAINING SCHOOL (606 Payne St.).

Principal.—Miss Ida F. Hubbard, Ascutneyville, Vt. Miss Bena P. Gummersbach, New York City, N. Y. " Emilie Weiss, Jenkintown, Pa. " A. Irene Reed, Olivet, Mich.

CHATTANOOGA, TENN.

[D]Rev. J. E. Smith, Chattanooga, Tenn.

[D] This church is self-supporting.

TENNESSEE MOUNTAIN WORK.

GRAND VIEW.

Minister and Instructor in Biblical Department, Rev. W. W. Dorman, B.D., Somerville, Mass.

GRAND VIEW NORMAL INSTITUTE.

Principal.—Prof. W. F. Cameron, Ph.B., South Bend, Ind. Rev. W. W. Dorman, B.D., Somerville, Mass. Mrs. W. F. Cameron, South Bend, Ind. Miss Grace Putnam, Chattanooga, Tenn. " Maud Taylor, Grand View, Tenn. " Gertrude Huntington, Grand View, Tenn. Mrs. Carrie Ferree, Grand View, Tenn. Miss Katherine P. Williamson, Englewood, Ill.

PLEASANT HILL.

Minister, Rev. W. E. Wheeler, Richfield, Ohio.

PLEASANT HILL ACADEMY.

Principal.—Rev. Warren E. Wheeler, Richfield, Ohio. Mrs. Kate L. Wheeler, Richfield, Ohio. Miss Hattie E. Hayes, Wakeman, Ohio. " Flora M. Cone, Masonville, N. Y. " E. Josephine Orton, Chicago, Ill. " Emma F. Dodge, Pleasant Hill, Tenn. Mrs. S. A. Hayes, Wakeman, Ohio. Mr. Chas. R. Blanks, Pine Bluff, Tenn.

General Agent, Rev. B. Dodge, Pleasant Hill, Tenn.

POMONA AND CROSSVILLE.

Minister, Rev. H. E. Partridge, Pomona, Tenn.

Teacher at Pomona, Mrs. A. E. Graves, Pomona, Tenn.

Teachers at Crossville, Mr. Thos. Snodgrass, Crossville, Tenn. Mr. Geo. Burnett, Crossville, Tenn.

MOSSY GROVE.

Minister, Rev. J. B. Cabble, Whetstone, Tenn.

DEER LODGE, PIONEER AND RUGBY.

Minister, Rev. George Lusty, Deer Lodge, Tenn.

GLEN MARY, HELENWOOD, ROBBINS AND MILL CREEK.

Minister, Rev. M. N. Sumner, Mill Creek, Tenn.

BON AIR AND ROCK HOUSE.

Minister, Rev. E. N. Goff, Bon Air, Tenn.

HARRIMAN.

Minister, Rev. W. G. Olinger, Harriman, Tenn.

JELLICO.

Minister, Rev. L. C. Partridge, Jellico, Tenn.

PINE MOUNTAIN.

Rev. —— ——

BIG CREEK.

Minister, Rev. George Ames, Berea, Ky.

BIG CREEK GAP.

Teachers, Miss Kate LaGrange, Feura Bush, N. Y. " Ollie LaGrange, Feura Bush, N. Y.

CUMBERLAND GAP.

Minister, Rev. A. A. Myers, Cumberland Gap, Tenn.

HARROW SCHOOL.

Principal.—Prof. G. A. Holzinger, Winona, Minn. Mrs. A. A. Myers, Cumberland Gap, Tenn. Miss M. M. Lickorish, Elyria, Ohio. " Mabel A. Wightman, Rock Creek, Ohio. " L. Belle Knott, Clifton, Ohio. " I. Ola Akin, Waterloo, Iowa.

KENTUCKY.

LEXINGTON.

Minister, Rev. Byron Gunner, Lexington, Ky.

CHANDLER NORMAL SCHOOL (351 North Broadway).

Principal.—Miss Fanny J. Webster, Sacramento, Cal. Miss Katharine S. Dalton, Fremont, Ohio. " Gertrude Takken, Saugatuck, Mich. " Susan I. Estabrook, Olivet, Mich. " Mary H. Ewans, Belfontaine, Ohio. " Hester A. Washburn, Delavan, Wis. " Susa H. Breck, Topeka, Kan. " Mary S. Larkin, Marion, Ala.

HAND PRIMARY SCHOOL.

Miss Elnora M. Winter, Nashville, Tenn. " Birdie M. Wills, Nashville, Tenn.

LOUISVILLE.

Minister, Rev. E. G. Harris, Washington, D. C.

KENTUCKY MOUNTAIN WORK.

WILLIAMSBURG.

Minister, Rev. W. B. Frey, Williamsburg, Ky.

WILLIAMSBURG ACADEMY.

Principal.—Prof. Chas. M. Stevens, Williamsburg, Ky. Miss Ella M. Andrews, Frankfort, Mich. " Amelia L. Ferris, Oneida, Ill. " M. Amelia Packard, Brooklyn, N. Y. " Carrie M. Ruddock, Clarksfield, Ohio. " Julia B. Glines, Elmira, N. Y. " Nora Hill, Williamsburg, Ky. " Minnie Ferree, Harriman, Tenn. Rev. George Ames, Berea, Ky.

ROCKHOLD, CORBIN, WOODBINE AND PLEASANT VIEW.

Minister, Rev. George Ames, Berea, Ky.

CLOVER BOTTOM, GRAY-HAWK, COMBS AND MIDDLE FORK.

Minister, Rev. Mason Jones, Combs, Ky.

CARPENTER, MARSH CREEK AND LICK CREEK.

Minister, Rev. Samuel Sutton, Williamsburg, Ky.

RED ASH (PROCTOR) AND PIONEER.

Minister, Rev. L. C. Partridge, Jellico, Tenn.

MORGAN AND WOLFE COUNTY MISSIONS.

SPRADLING, MAYTOWN, FLAT ROCK AND CAMPTON.

Minister, Rev. J. W. Doane, Campton, Ky.

Teachers at Campton, Mrs. Sarah G. Street, Kennedy, Neb. Miss Mary L. Baird, Mallet Creek, Ohio.

BLACK MOUNTAIN (P. O. EVARTS.)

Minister, Rev. Herbert Carleton, A. M., Evarts, Ky.

BLACK MOUNTAIN ACADEMY.

Rev. Herbert Carleton, A. M., Evarts, Ky. Miss Belle M. Hodge, Deer Lodge, Tenn. " Sarah E. Ober, Beverly, Mass. Mrs. Blanche B. Carleton, Evarts, Ky.

SANDER'S CREEK.

Minister, Rev. Samuel Sutton, Williamsburg, Ky.

ARKANSAS.

LITTLE ROCK.

Minister and Teacher, Rev. Y. B. Sims, Talladega, Ala.

HELENA.

HELENA NORMAL SCHOOL.

Principal.—Prof. Chas. W. Driskell, Stanfordville, Ga. Mrs. Chas. W. Driskell, Stanfordville, Ga. Miss Bettie A. Gunner, Lexington, Ky. " Ella M. Thomason, Athens, Ala.

OKLAHOMA.

GUTHRIE.

Minister, Rev. Thomas J. Austin, Jackson, Tenn.

LANGSTON.

Minister, Rev. R. J. Holloway, Langston, Okla. Ter.

MISSISSIPPI.

TOUGALOO.

Minister, Rev. Frank G. Woodworth, D.D., Tougaloo, Miss.

TOUGALOO UNIVERSITY.

President.—Rev. F. G. Woodworth, D.D., Tougaloo, Miss. Rev. Henry E. Sawyer, A.M., Boston, Mass. Prof. Albert S. Hill, A.M., Columbus, Ohio. Mr. L. J. Carrier, Phoenix, N. Y. " A. H. Stone, B.S., Philliston, Mass. " Frank H. Ball, Worcester, Mass. " A. H. Bennett, Holden, Mass. Miss Elizabeth Ainsworth, Hyde Park, Mass. " Mary M. Booth, A.B., New Britain, Conn. " Edith M. Hall, Oberlin, Ohio. " Mary E. Hodge, B.S., Hartland, Wis. " Bertha M. Kaestner, Chicago, Ill. " Myrta A. Lyman, Grinnell, Ia. " Carrie E. Parkhurst, Manchester, N. H. " C. E. Pingree, M.D., Denmark, Me. " Emma C. Redick, Mansfield, Ohio. " Emma Robertson, Concord, N. H. " Mary P. Roberts, Jacksonville, Ill. " S. M. Noble, Fluvanna, N. Y. " Margaret K. Russell, Jacksonville, Ill. Mrs. L. J. Carrier, Phoenix, N. Y. " Helen M. Sawyer, Boston, Mass. " L. M. Sisson, Windsor, Vt.

MERIDIAN.

Minister, Rev. C. L. Harris, Meridian, Miss.

Teachers, Principal.—Mrs. H. I. Miller, Topeka, Kan. Miss May Knox, Chester, Mass. " Maria Myers, Kidder, Mo. " Hattie J. Lovewell, Willow Springs, Mo. " Ella C. Abbott, Winchester, Mass. " C. E. Kendall, Dunstable, Mass.

MOORHEAD.

ALMEDA GARDNER SCHOOL.

Principal.—Miss S. L. Emerson, Hallowell, Me. Miss E. L. Parsons, Mount Morris, N. Y. " S. J. Lime, Port Carbon, Pa.

JACKSON.

Teachers, Miss Mary Jane Gibson, Jackson, Miss. " Sarah Jane Thomas, Summit, Miss.

MOUND BAYOU.

NORMAL INSTITUTE.

Teachers, Mr. Isaiah T. Montgomery, Mound Bayou, Miss. Miss Mary V. Montgomery, Mound Bayou, Miss. " M. Nellie Crump, Nashville, Tenn.

NEW RUHAMAH, PLEASANT RIDGE, SALEM AND COLUMBUS.

Missionaries, Mrs. M. A. F. Tapley, Columbus, Miss. Miss I. D. Feemster, Columbus, Miss.

LOUISIANA.

NEW ORLEANS.

Minister (University Church), Rev. George W. Henderson, North Craftsbury, Vt.

STRAIGHT UNIVERSITY (490 Canal St.).

President.—Prof. Oscar Atwood, A.M., Jeffersonville, Vt. Rev. George W. Henderson, A.M., North Craftsbury, Vt. Mr. Arthur C. Cole, A.B., Olivet, Mich. Miss Emily W. Nichols, Clinton, N. Y. " Mary W. Culver, Buchanan, Mich. Mrs. Edwin J. Pond, Washington, D. C. Miss Margaret E. Reed, Princeton, Ill. Mrs. L. St. John Hitchcock, Simsbury, Conn. Miss Mary D. Coghill, New Orleans, La. " Anna M. Paddock, North Craftsbury, Vt. " Nettie M. White, New Castle, N. H. Mr. George L. Dewey, Norwich, Conn. Mrs. George L. Dewey, Norwich, Conn. Mr. Emerson C. Rose, New Orleans, La. " James D. Gordon, New Orleans, La. Miss Jennie Fyfe, Lansing, Mich. " Carrie E. Hodgman, Princeton, Ill. " Belle C. Harriman, North Craftsbury, Vt.

DANIEL HAND PREPARATORY SCHOOL.

Miss Louise Denton, Freeport, N. Y. " Deborah B. Johnson, New Orleans, La. Mrs. E. E. McKibban, Manhattan, Kan. Miss Harriet M. Markham, Chicopee Falls, Mass.

NEW ORLEANS (CENTRAL CHURCH) INSTITUTIONAL.

Minister, Rev. John W. Whittaker, New Orleans, La.

Assistant Minister, Miss Bella W. Hume, New Haven, Conn.

Missionary, Miss Helen Taylor, New Orleans, La.

NEW ORLEANS (SPAIN ST. CHURCH).

Minister, Rev. Cornelius W. Johnson, New Orleans, La.

NEW ORLEANS (MORRIS BROWN CHURCH).

Minister, Rev. I. H. Hall, New Orleans, La.

NEW IBERIA.

Minister, Rev. C. H. Claiborne, New Orleans, La.

THIBODEAUX.

Minister, Rev. J. E. Smith, New Orleans, La.

HAMMOND.

Minister, Rev. C. H. Crawford, Glenwood, La.

ROSELAND.

Minister, Rev. Henry Kendall, Roseland, La.

BELLE PLACE.

Minister, Rev. M. W. Whitt, Belle Place, La.

ABBEVILLE.

Minister, Rev. J. A. Herod, Abbeville, La.

SCHRIEVER.

(MORNING STAR AND ST. MARK'S CHURCHES.)

Minister, William Brown, Schriever, La.

LOCKPORT.

Minister, Charles Sands, Lockport, La.

ST. SOPHIE.

Minister, Rev. C. W. Johnson, St. Sophie, La.

TEXAS.

AUSTIN.

Minister, Rev. W. S. Goss, St. Johnsbury, Vt.

TILLOTSON INSTITUTE.

President.—Prof. W. S. Goss, A.B., St. Johnsbury, Vt. Mrs. W. S. Goss, St. Johnsbury, Vt. Miss Florence A. Sperry, Rock Creek, Mich. " Ada M. Sprague, B.S., Keene, Ohio. " Helen L. Robertson, Churchville, N. Y. " Ida F. Hayden, Medford, Mass. " Elizabeth B. Meek, B.S., Bellefonte, Pa. " Phoebe B. Parsons, Marcellus, N. Y. " Margaret Portune, Cincinnati, Ohio. " Ella A. Perley, Portland, Me. " Marie D. Holzinger, Olivet, Mich. " Martha J. Adams, Columbus, Wis. Mr. Thomas J. Larkin, Marion, Ala. " James S. Bingham, Winsted, Conn.

CORPUS CHRISTI AND GOLIAD.

Minister, Rev. J. D. Pettigrew, Corpus Christi, Tex.

HELENA.

Minister, Rev. Mitchell Thompson, Helena, Tex.

PARIS.

Minister, Rev. A. C. Garner, Chicago, Ill.

Teachers, Rev. A. C. Garner, Chicago, Ill. Mrs. A. C. Garner, Chicago, Ill.

DODD AND ROXTON.

Minister and Teacher, Rev. R. H. Henson, Paris, Tex.

DALLAS.

Minister and Teacher, Rev. E. E. Sims, Dallas, Tex. Mrs. E. E. Sims, Dallas, Tex.

INDIAN MISSIONS.

SANTEE AGENCY, NEBRASKA.

NORMAL TRAINING SCHOOL.

Superintendent and Minister, Rev. A. L. Riggs, D.D., Santee Agency, Neb.

Teachers, Mr. F. B. Riggs, Santee Agency, Neb. Miss Harriet B. Ilsley, Newark, N. J. " Edith Leonard, Rochester, Mass. " Williametta O. Nash, South Norwalk, Conn. " Carolette Smith, Grand Rapids, Mich.

Native Teachers, Mr. Eli Abraham, Santee Agency, Neb. Rev. James Garvie, Santee Agency, Neb. Mr. C. W. Hoffman, Elbow Woods, No. Dak.

Matrons, Miss S. Lizzie Voorhees, Rocky Hill, N. J. (Boys' Cottage.) Miss Ella Worden, Santee Agency, Neb. (Whitney Hall.) Mrs. A. C. Slaughter, Hudson, Ohio. (Dakota Home.) Miss Harriet A. Brown, Rocky Point, N. Y. (Bird's Nest.) Mrs. E. J. Black, Santee Agency, Neb. (Dining Hall.)

Missionaries, Mrs. A. L. Riggs, Santee Agency, Neb. " F. B. Riggs, Santee Agency, Neb. " C. R. Lawson, Santee Agency, Neb. " W. H. Hamlin, Santee Agency, Neb. " I. P. Wold, Santee Agency, Neb. " H. L. Stone, Santee Agency, Neb. Miss May Slaughter (Clerk), Hudson, Ohio.

Industrial Department, Iver P. Wold, Shoemaking, Santee Agency, Neb. Charles R. Lawson, Printing, Santee Agency, Neb. Robert Y. Gray, Blacksmithing, Santee Agency, Neb. William H. Hamlin, Farm Supt., Santee Agency, Neb. Homer L. Stone, Bakery, Santee Agency, Neb. Miss Ella Worden, Cooking School, Santee Agency, Neb. " Jennie M. Lind, Sewing School, Yankton, So. Dak.

Native Pastor, Rev. Artemas Ehnamani, Santee Agency, Neb.

PONCA AGENCY, NEB.

Native Missionary, Rev. James Garvie, Santee Agency, Neb.

CHEYENNE RIVER AGENCY, S. D.

Rev. T. L. Riggs, General Missionary.

CENTRAL STATION, OAHE, SOUTH DAKOTA.

Minister, Mr. David Lee, Bad River, S. D.

OAHE INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL.

Treasurer, Mr. Elias Jacobsen, Oahe, S. D.

Teachers, Mrs. T. L. Riggs, Oahe, S. D. Miss Eva F. Dixon, Dunstable, Mass. " Florence E. Hunnewell, Olivet, Mich.

OUT-STATIONS.

BAD RIVER.

Mr. Stephen Yellow-Hawk, Oahe, S. D.

ELIZABETH WINYAN MEMORIAL STATION, CHEYENNE RIVER.

Rev. Edwin Phelps, Collamer, S. D. Mrs. Ellen Phelps, Collamer, S. D.

[E]PLUM CREEK BOARDING SCHOOL, CHEYENNE RIVER.

Mr. William M. Griffiths, Chicago, Ill. Mrs. Martha H. Griffiths, Ross, Ohio.

CHERRY CREEK, CHEYENNE RIVER.

Mr. Clarence Ward, Leslie, S. D. Mrs. Estelle Ward, Leslie, S. D.

TOUCH THE CLOUD STATION, CHEYENNE RIVER.

Mr. Justin Black-Eagle, Leslie, S. D.

[F]WHITEHORSE STATION, MOREAU RIVER.

Mr. Ansel Chapin, Leslie, S. D. Mrs. Mary Chapin, Leslie, S. D.

REMINGTON STATION, MOREAU RIVER.

Mr. John Bluecloud, Sisseton Agency, S. D. Mrs. Nora Bluecloud, Sisseton Agency, S. D. Miss Dora B. Dodge, Brooklyn, N. Y.

HOPE STATION, MOREAU RIVER.

Mr. Daniel Yawa, Moreau River, S. D. Mrs. Mary Yawa, Moreau River, S. D.

THUNDER BUTTE, MOREAU RIVER.

Mr. Daniel White-Thunder, Leslie, S. D. Mrs. Elida White-Thunder, Leslie, S. D.

[E] Supported by the Society for Propagating the Gospel. [F] Supported by the Native Missionary Society.

STANDING ROCK AGENCY, N. D.

CENTRAL STATION.

Rev. George W. Reed, Springfield, Mass. Mrs. Charlotte M. Reed, Springfield, Mass.

ELKHORN STATION.

Miss Mary C. Collins, Keokuk, Iowa. Mr. Huntington Wakutemani, Grand River, S. D. Mrs. Louisa Wakutemani, Grand River, S. D.

LONG HILL STATION.

Miss Mary P. Lord, Wellesley, Mass.

OAK CREEK STATION.

Mr. Elias Gilbert, Sisseton Agency, S. D. Mrs. Mary Gilbert, Sisseton Agency, S. D.

ROCK CREEK STATION.

Mr. Simon Kirk, Sisseton Agency, S. D. Mrs. Julia Kirk, Sisseton Agency, S. D.

THUNDER HAWK STATION.

Mr. David Many Buffalo, Grand River, S. D. Mrs. Martha Many Buffalo, Grand River, S. D.

MISSOURI RIVER STATION.

[G]Mr. Arthur Tibbetts, Cannon Ball, N. D.

CANNON BALL STATION.

Mr. Arthur Tibbetts, Cannon Ball, N. D.

[G] Supported by the Native Missionary Society.

ROSEBUD RESERVATION, SOUTH DAKOTA.

ROSEBUD AGENCY.

Rev. James F. Cross, Rosebud Agency, S. D. Mrs. Stella P. Cross, Rosebud Agency, S. D.

BURRELL STATION (P. O. Basin, Neb.).

Rev. Francis Frazier, Santee Agency, Neb. Mrs. Maggie Frazier, Santee Agency, Neb.

PARK STREET CHURCH STATION (White River, P. O. Stearns).

Mr. Lot Frazier, Rosebud Agency, S. D. Mrs. Rebecca Frazier, Rosebud Agency, S. D.

BLACK PIPE BRANCH.

Mr. Solomon B. Yellow-Hawk, Fort Pierre, S. D. Mrs. Josephine Yellow-Hawk, Fort Pierre, S. D.

FORT BERTHOLD AGENCY, NORTH DAKOTA.

Superintendent and Missionaries, Rev. C. L. Hall, Fort Berthold, N. D. Mrs. S. W. Hall, Fort Berthold, N. D.

Teachers and Matrons, Miss A. Z. Powell, Templeton, S. D. " Annie R. Creighton, Dundee, Scotland. " Annette P. Brickett, Haverhill, Mass. " Jessie McKenzie, Minneapolis, Minn. Mr. H. A. Hatch, Lindenville, Ohio.

MOODY STATION, NO. 1 (Independence).

Miss Otta Wolf, Fort Berthold, N. C.

MOODY STATION, NO. 2 (Elbow Woods).

Miss Elizabeth Kehoe, Chicago, Ill.

WASHINGTON.

S'KOKOMISH AGENCY.

Missionary, Rev. Myron Eells, Union City, Wash.

MONTANA.

CROW AGENCY.

Rev. J. G. Burgess, Crow Agency, Mont. Mrs. J. G. Burgess, Crow Agency, Mont.

ALASKA.

CAPE PRINCE OF WALES.

Mr. W. T. Lopp, Cape Prince of Wales, Alas. Mrs. W. T. Lopp, Cape Prince of Wales, Alas.

CHINESE MISSIONS.

Superintendent, Rev. Wm. C. Pond, D.D., San Francisco, Cal.

FRESNO.

Teachers, Miss J. R. Beaton, Fresno, Cal. Loo Quong, Fresno, Cal.

LOS ANGELES.

Teacher, Mrs. T. M. Webb, Los Angeles, Cal.

MARYSVILLE.

Teachers, Miss Mattie A. Flint, Marysville, Cal. Chung Moi, Marysville, Cal.

OAKLAND.

Teachers, Miss Rosa E. Lamont, San Francisco, Cal. Tip Bow, Oakland, Cal.

OROVILLE.

Teachers, Miss Estella Chase, Oroville, Cal. " Reese, Oroville, Cal.

PETALUMA.

Teacher, Mrs. M. N. Colby, Petaluma, Cal.

RIVERSIDE

Teacher, Mrs. W. N. Wyckoff, Riverside, Cal.

SACRAMENTO.

Teachers, Mrs. S. E. Carrington, Sacramento, Cal. Chin Toy, Sacramento, Cal.

SAN BERNARDINO.

Teachers, Mrs. E. M. Davis, San Bernardino, Cal. Gin Foo King, San Bernardino, Cal.

SAN DIEGO.

Teachers, Mrs. E. M. Stetson, San Diego, Cal. Hom Goon, San Diego, Cal.

SAN FRANCISCO (CENTRAL).

Teachers, Mrs. H. W. Lamont, San Francisco, Cal. " M. A. Greene, San Francisco, Cal. Miss J. G. Morrison, San Francisco, Cal. Jee Gam, San Francisco, Cal.

SAN FRANCISCO (BARNES).

Teacher, Miss Olive Patton, San Francisco, Cal.

SAN FRANCISCO (WEST).

Teachers, Miss V. W. Lamont, San Francisco, Cal. Chin Quong, San Francisco, Cal.

SANTA BARBARA.

Teachers, Miss Lida A. Thompson, Santa Barbara, Cal. Mrs. Snell, Santa Barbara, Cal.

SANTA CRUZ.

Teachers, Mrs. Kate V. Hall, Santa Cruz, Cal. Pon Fang, Santa Cruz, Cal.

STOCKTON.

Teacher, Mrs. A. P. Patterson, Stockton, Cal.

VENTURA.

Teachers, Miss Alma Bradley, Ventura, Cal. Mrs. Henry, Ventura, Cal. Yong Kay, Ventura, Cal.

VERNONDALE.

Teacher, Miss Ella Thomson, Vernondale, Cal.

WATSONVILLE.

Teachers, Mrs. Martha Ellis, Watsonville, Cal. Joe Dun, Watsonville, Cal.

* * * * *

TEACHERS RESIDENCES.

* * * * *

MAINE.

Castine.—Prof. Fred. W. Foster, Mrs. Mary W. Foster, Mr. B. F. Perkins. Denmark.—Miss C. E. Pingree, M.D., Miss L. A. Pingree. Hallowell.—Miss S. L. Emerson. Limerick.—Rev. T. S. Perry. Portland.—Miss A. E. Farrington, Miss Ella A. Perley. Pulpit Harbor.—Miss Carrie E. Leadbetter. Saco.—Miss Mary E. Sands. Winthrop.—Miss L. J. Hanscom.

NEW HAMPSHIRE.

Acworth.—Miss Agnes Ruth Mitchell. Chester.—Miss Celestia S. Goldsmith. East Barrington.—Miss Eva F. Chesley. Gossville.—Miss Dora A. Scribner, B.A. Keene.—Miss Emily R. Bishop. Langdon.—Miss Harriet Towne. Manchester.—Miss Carrie E. Parkhurst. New Castle.—Miss Nettie M. White.

VERMONT.

Ascutneyville.—Miss Ida F. Hubbard. Jeffersonville.—Prof. Oscar Atwood, A.M. North Craftsbury.—Miss Belle C. Harriman, Rev. Geo. W. Henderson, A.M., Miss Anna M. Paddock. Sherburne.—Miss Lilla L. Johnson. St. Johnsbury.—Prof. W. S. Goss, A.B., Mrs. W. S. Goss. Windsor.—Mrs. S. M. Sisson. Woodstock.—Miss Lucy E. Fairbanks.

MASSACHUSETTS.

Amherst.—Mrs. Lucy R. Greene. Beverly.—Miss Sarah E. Ober. Boston.—Miss Lilla V. Davis, Rev. Henry E. Sawyer, A.M., Mrs. Helen M. Sawyer. Cambridgeport.—Prof. Fred. S. Hitchcock, Mrs. Fred. S. Hitchcock. Chester.—Miss May Knox. Chicopee Falls.—Miss Harriet M. Markham. Dunstable.—Miss Eva F. Dixon. Miss C. E. Kendall. East Northfield.—Miss Susan M. Marsh. Granville.—Miss. Otis S. Dickinson. Haverhill.—Miss Annette P. Brickett. Holden.—Mr. A. H. Bennett. Housatonic.—Miss Jennie Curtis. Hyde Park.—Miss Elizabeth Ainsworth, Miss J. A. Ainsworth. Lee.—Prof. Morrison A. Holmes, Mrs. M. A. Holmes. Medford.—Miss Ida F. Hayden. Methuen.—Miss Caroline E. Frost. North Amherst.—Miss Nellie D. Cooley. Philliston.—Mr. A. H. Stone, B.S. Rochester.—Miss Edith Leonard. Salem.—Miss Minnie T. Strout. Somerville.—Rev. W. W. Dorman, B.D. So. Hadley Falls.—Miss Katharine M. Jacobs. Springfield.—Rev. Geo. W. Reed, Mrs. Charlotte M. Reed. Stoneham.—Miss Helen Hanson. Wellesley.—Miss Mary P. Lord. Westborough.—Miss A. Merriam. Winchester.—Miss Ella C. Abbott. Worcester.—Mr. Frank H. Ball, Prof. Geo. C. Burrage, A.B., Prof. Herbert F. Burrage, B.S., Miss Ella E. Roper, Mrs. A. S. Webber.

CONNECTICUT.

Brookfield Centre.—Rev. Sandy A. Paris. Granby.—Mrs. W. D. McFarland. Lyme.—Miss Anna R. Miner. New Britain.—Miss Mary M. Booth, A.B. New Haven.—Miss Carrie E. Bishop, Rev. G. S. Dickerman, Miss Bella W. Hume, Miss Mary E. McLane. Norwich.—Mr. Geo. L. Dewey, Mrs. Geo. L. Dewey, Miss Harriet E. Leach, Miss Mary E. Perkins. Simsbury.—Mrs. L. St. John Hitchcock. South Norwalk.—Miss Williametta O. Nash. Winsted.—Mr. James S. Bingham.

NEW YORK.

Brooklyn.—Miss Dora B. Dodge, Miss M. Amelia Packard. Chautauqua.—Mrs. M. L. Jenkins. Churchville.—Miss Helen L. Robertson. Clinton.—Miss Emily W. Nichols. Elmira.—Miss Julia B. Glines, Miss Antoinette Kellogg. Feury Bush.—Miss Kate C. LaGrange, Miss Ollie LaGrange. Fluvanna.—Miss S. M. Noble. Fredonia.—Miss Kate L. Snow. Freeport.—Miss Louise Denton. Fulton.—Prof. B. D. Rowlee, Mrs. Julia E. Rowlee. Gasport.—Miss Ida C. Chapin. Le Roy.—Miss Emma L. Parsons, M.A. Lewis.—Miss Etta M. Hitchcock. Marcellus.—Miss Phoebe B. Parsons. Masonville.—Miss Flora M. Cone. Moravia.—Mrs. Julia E. Titus. Mount Morris.—Miss E. L. Parsons. Newark Valley.—Miss Helen S. Loveland. Newburgh.—Rev. H. T. Johnson, Mrs. E. S. Johnson. New York City.—Miss Bena P. Gummersbach, Miss Nellie D. Sheldon. North Hannibal.—Miss Alice A. Clarke. Phoenix.—Mr. L. J. Carrier, Mrs. L. J. Carrier, Miss Minnie M. Gates, Miss Caroline Wandell. Rochester.—Mrs. Alice M. Brown. Rocky Point.—Miss Harriet A. Brown. Rose View.—Miss Anna M. Woodruff. Rouse's Point.—Miss Mary L. Thompson. Rushville.—Miss Marie E. Hoover. Sandy Hill.—Miss Helen M. Hyde. Syracuse.—Miss Julia H. Curtis, Miss Ruth K. Kingsley. Tuckahoe.—Prof. Martin Lovering, A.B. Utica.—Miss Julia R. Mitchell. West Bloomfield.—Miss Carrie E. Browne. Westfield.—Miss Jennie L. Blowers. Westmoreland.—Miss Alice M. Garsden.

NEW JERSEY.

Morristown.—Miss Julia B. Ford. Newark.—Rev. C. C. Collins, Miss Harriet B. Isley. Orange.—Miss Frances M. Williams. Rocky Hill.—Miss S. Lizzie Voorhees.

PENNSYLVANIA.

Bellefonte.—Miss Justia C. Hoy, Miss Elizabeth B. Meek, B.S. Boalsburg.—Miss Anna M. Cooper. Jenkintown.—Miss Emilie Weiss. Port Carbon.—Miss S. J. Lime. Reading.—Rev. R. B. Johns.



DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA.

Tacoma Park.—Miss Estelle I. Sprague. Washington.—Mr. Clement L. Brambaugh, Rev. Sterling N. Brown, A.M., Rev. Charles. H. Butler, Rev. Isaac Clark, A.M., Rev. J. L. Ewell, A.M., Rev. Teunis S. Hamlin, D.D., Rev. E. G. Harris, Rev. John T. Jenifer, Rev. E. A. Johnson, Mrs. E. A. Johnson, Rev. Eugene Johnson, Rev. Geo. D. Little, D.D., Mrs. Edwin J. Pond, Rev. J. E. Rankin, D.D., L.L.D., Rev. Adam Reoch, A.B., Prof. Wm. J. Stephens.

OHIO.

Belfontaine.—Miss Mary H. Ewans. Brecksville.—Miss Harriet E. Bell. Bryan.—Miss Alice M. Grass. Charlestown.—Miss Edith M. Hatfield, Miss Libbie A. Hatfield. Cincinnati.—Miss Margaret Portune. Clarksfield.—Miss Carrie M. Ruddock. Clifton.—Miss L. Belle Knott. Columbus.—Prof. Albert S. Hill, A.M. Creston.—Miss Charlotte J. Knowlton. Dover.—Miss Alice M. Whitsey. Elyria.—Miss M. M. Lickorish. Everett.—Miss E. B. Scobie. Fremont.—Miss Katharine S. Dalton. Greenfield.—Miss Clara S. Boyd. Hamilton.—Miss S. Josephine Scott. Hammond.—Miss Emma J. Rosecrans. Hudson.—Miss Ruth M. French, Mrs. A. C. Slaughter, Miss May Slaughter. Huron.—Miss Edna Harris. Keene.—Miss Ada M. Sprague, B.S. Lindenville.—Mr. H. A. Hatch. Mallet Creek.—Miss Mary L. Baird. Mansfield.—Miss Emma C. Redick. North Kingsville.—Miss Isadore M. Caughey. Nova—Miss Mary C. Phelps, Ph.B. Oberlin.—Miss Maude L. Barnum, Miss Ella Louise Cheney, Mrs. Alice Davis, Miss Edith M. Hall, Miss Stella M. Hopkinson, Prof. Thos. S. Inborden, Miss Corrie N. Johnson, Miss Julia E. McMillan, Mrs. Lucy M. Mellen, Miss Nellie I. Reed, Miss Carrie E. Tambling, Miss Edith M. Thatcher, Prof. F. T. Waters, A.M. Painesville.—Miss Nina B. Mosher. Parkman.—Miss Clara A. Dole. Richfield.—Rev. Warren E. Wheeler, Mrs. Kate L. Wheeler. Rock Creek.—Miss Mabel A. Wightman. Rootstown.—Miss Julia P. Seymour. Ross.—Mrs. Martha H. Griffiths. Sheffield.—Miss L. E. Woodruff. Tallmadge.—Miss Ester A. Barnes. Wakeman.—Miss Hattie E. Hayes, Mrs. S. A. Hayes. Xenia.—Miss Gertrude Harnar.

INDIANA.

Laporte.—Miss M. R. Ruckman. South Bend.— Prof. W. F. Cameron, Ph.B., Mrs. W. F. Cameron. Valparaiso.—Miss Clara E. Noble.

ILLINOIS.

Chicago.—Rev. A. C. Garner, Mrs. A. C. Garner, Mr. Wm. M. Griffiths, Miss Bertha M. Kaestner, Miss Elizabeth Kehoe, Miss E. Josephine Orton, Miss Mary T. Richardson, B.A., Rev. S. P. Smith. Danville.—Miss Frances L. Yeomans. Downer's Grove.—Mr. O. R. Brown, Mrs. B. C. Brown. Elmhurst.—Miss Emma F. King. Englewood.—Miss Katharine P. Williamson. Freeport.—Miss Miriam E. Carey. Jacksonville.—Miss Mary P. Roberts, Miss Margaret K. Russell. Oneida.—Miss Amelia L. Ferris. Princeton.—Miss Carrie E. Hodgman, Miss Margaret E. Reed.

MICHIGAN.

Adrian.—Miss Julia A. Condit. Battle Creek.—Miss Edith M. Robinson, Miss Maude A. Robinson. Buchanan.—Miss Mary W. Culver. Detroit.—Rev. J. M. Robinson, Mrs. J. M. Robinson, Miss Jennie M. Street. Frankfort.—Miss Ella M. Andrews, Miss Hattie M. Fairchild. Grand Ledge.—Miss Lora D. Tanner. Grand Rapids.—Miss Carolette Smith. Kalamazoo.—Miss C. M. Dox, Miss May Bell Nicholson, Miss Luella Waring. Lansing.—Miss Jennie Fyfe, Miss Alice A. Holmes. Monroe.—Miss Ada Louise Wilcox. Olivet.—Miss A. Irene Reed, Mr. Arthur C. Cole, A.B., Miss Susan T. Estabrook, Miss Marie D. Holzinger, Miss Florence E. Hunnewell, Mr. John Orr, Mrs. John Orr, Miss Harriet E. White. Rock Creek.—Miss Florence A. Sperry. Salem.—Miss N. S. Dennis. Saugatuck.—Miss Gertrude Takken.

IOWA.

Belmont.—Miss Susan Sands. Decorah.—Miss E. W. Douglass. Grinnell.—Miss Myrta A. Lyman, Miss Alice L. Walker, Ph.B. Keokuk.—Miss Mary C. Collins. Marathon.—Miss A. Laura Humphries. Nashua.—Miss Nellie J. Arnott, Miss Edna M. Heald. Nevada.—Miss Ada J. Ringheim. Rockford.—Miss B. R. Parmenter. Vincennes.—Miss L. C. Holman. Waterloo.—Miss I. Ola Akin.

MISSOURI.

Kidder.—Miss Maria Myers. Springfield.—Miss May E. Newton. St. Louis.—Mrs. Virginia C. Logie. Willow Springs.—Miss Hattie J. Lovewell.

WISCONSIN.

Acorn.—Miss Mary E. Brereton. Columbus.—Miss Martha J. Adams. Delavan.—Miss Hester. A. Washburn. Evansville.—Miss Mary D. Backenstoe. Hartland.—Miss Mary E. Hodge, B.S., Miss Mary E. Simonds. Ladoga.—Miss Edith E. Lamb, Miss Myra J. Lamb. Madison.—Miss Lillian J. Beecroft. Palmyra.—Miss Nellie Bishop. Whitewater.—Miss Ella A. Hamilton, Miss Minerva A. Kinney, Prof. A. J. Steele, A.M.

KANSAS.

Bavaria.—Miss Susan A. Cooley. Manhattan.—Mr. E. E. McKibban, Mrs. E. E. McKibban. Topeka.—Miss Susa H. Breck, Rev. E. W. Hollies, Mrs. S. Hollies, Miss Minnie Hollies, Mrs. H. I. Miller.

MINNESOTA.

Benson.—Miss M. E. Wilcox. Clearwater.—Prof. H. E. Sargent, Mrs. H. E. Sargent. Mazeppa.—Miss Mary D. Hyde. Minneapolis.—Miss Mary A. Bye, B.S., Miss Lillian S. Cathcart, Miss Jessie McKenzie. Montevideo.—Miss Lillian Lavinia Goar. St. Paul.—Miss Nellie F. Comings. Winona.—Prof. G. A. Holzinger.

NEBRASKA.

Crete.—Rev. A. W. Curtis, D.D. Hartington.—Miss Harriet M. Smith. Kennedy.—Mrs. Sarah G. Street. Omaha.—Mrs. A. E. Foote. Santee Agency.—Mr. Eli Abraham, Mrs. E. J. Black, Rev. Artemas Ehnamani, Rev. Francis Frazier, Mrs. Maggie Frazier, Rev. James Garvie, Mr. Robert G. Gray, Mr. William H. Hamlin, Mrs. W. H. Hamlin, Mr. Charles R. Lawson, Mrs. C. R. Lawson, Rev A. L. Riggs, D.D., Mrs. A. L. Riggs, Mr. F. B. Riggs, Mrs. F. B. Riggs, Mr. John Rouillard, Mrs. Mary Rouillard, Mr. Homer L. Stone, Mrs. Homer L. Stone, Mr. Iver P. Wold, Mrs. Iver P. Wold, Miss Ella Worden.

NORTH DAKOTA.

Cannon Ball.—Mr. Arthur Tibbetts. Elbow Woods.—Mr. C. W. Hoffman. Fort Berthold.—Rev. C. L. Hall, Mrs. S. W. Hall, Miss Otta Wolf.

SOUTH DAKOTA.

Bad River.—Mr. David Lee. Collamer.—Rev. Edwin Phelps, Mrs. Ellen Phelps. Dell Rapids.—Miss Mary W. Bryant. Fort Pierre.—Mr. Solomon B. Yellow-Hawk, Mrs. Josephine Yellow-Hawk. Grand River.—Mr. David Many Buffalo, Mrs. Martha Many Buffalo, Mr. Huntington Wakutemani, Mrs. Louisa Wakutemani. Lebanon.—Miss A. B. Chalfant. Leslie.—Mr. Justin Black Eagle, Mr. Ansel Chapin, Mrs. Mary Chapin, Mr. Clarence Ward, Mrs. Estelle Ward, Mr. Daniel White-Thunder, Mrs. Elida White-Thunder. Moreau River.—Mr. Daniel Yawa, Mrs. Mary Yawa. Oahe.—Rev. T. L. Riggs, Mrs. T. L. Riggs, Mr. Elias Jacobsen, Mr. Stephen Yellow-Hawk. Rosebud Agency.—Rev. James F. Cross, Mrs. Stella P. Cross, Mr. Lot Frazier, Mrs. Rebecca Frazier. Sisseton Agency.—Mr. John Bluecloud, Mrs. Nora Bluecloud, Mr. Elias Gilbert, Mrs. Mary Gilbert, Mr. Simon Kirk, Mrs. Julia Kirk. Templeton.—Miss A. Z. Powell. Yankton.—Miss Jennie M. Lind.

MONTANA.

Crow Agency.—Rev. J. G. Burgess, Mrs. J. G. Burgess.

COLORADO.

Denver.—Rev A. T. Burnell, Ph.D., Mrs. Mary A. Burnell.

OKLAHOMA TERRITORY.

Langston.—Rev. R. J. Holloway.

WASHINGTON.

Union City.—Rev. Myron Eells.

CALIFORNIA.

Fresno.—Miss J. R. Beaton, Loo Quong. Long Beach.—Miss Fanny J. Webster. Los Angeles.—Mrs. T. M. Webb. Marysville.—Miss Mattie A. Flint, Chung Moi. Oakland.—Tip Bow. Oroville.—Miss Estella Chase, Miss Reese. Petaluma.—Mrs. M. N. Colby. Riverside.—Mrs. W. N. Wyckoff. Sacramento.—Mrs. S. E. Carrington, Chin Toy, Miss Fanny J. Webster. San Bernardino.—Mrs. E. M. Davis, Gin Foo King. San Diego.—Mrs. E. M. Stetson, Hom Goon. San Francisco.—Mrs. M. A. Greene, Mrs. H. W. Lamont, Miss Rosa E. Lamont, Miss V. W. Lamont, Miss J. G. Morrison, Miss Olive Patton, Rev. W. C. Pond, D.D., Jee Gam, Chin Quong. Santa Barbara.—Miss Lida A. Thompson, Mrs. Snell. Santa Cruz.—Mrs. Kate V. Hall, Pon Fang, Miss H. P. Shepard. Stockton.—Mrs A. P. Patterson. Ventura.—Miss Alma Bradley, Mrs. Henry, Yong Kay. Vernondale.—Miss Ella Thomson. Watsonville.—Mrs. Martha Ellis, Joe Dun.

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