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The Golden Age Cook Book
by Henrietta Latham Dwight
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[ Transcriber's Note: Inconsistent spellings (especially in the table of contents) have been retained as in the original. Corrections of spelling and punctuation are listed at the end of this file. ]



THE

GOLDEN AGE

COOK BOOK.



HENRIETTA LATHAM DWIGHT.



NEW YORK: THE ALLIANCE PUBLISHING COMPANY, "LIFE" BUILDING, 1898.



Copyrighted, 1898, by HENRIETTA LATHAM DWIGHT.

PRESS OF THE PLIMPTON MFG. CO., HARTFORD, CONN.



Dedication.

TO ALL WHO ARE STRIVING TO FOLLOW THE GOLDEN RULE, "TO DO UNTO OTHERS AS THEY WOULD HAVE OTHERS DO UNTO THEM," AND THUS EXPRESS IN THEIR EVERY-DAY LIFE THE CHRIST IDEAL WRITTEN WITHIN, IN THEIR OWN SOULS, THIS BOOK IS

Affectionately Inscribed.



And God said, Behold, I have given you every herb bearing seed, which is upon the face of all the earth, and every tree, in the which is the fruit of a tree yielding seed; to you it shall be for meat. And to every beast of the earth, and to every fowl of the air, and to every thing that creepeth upon the earth, wherein there is life, I have given every green herb for meat: and it was so.—Genesis i., 29, 30.

Thou shalt not kill.—Exodus xx., 13.

For that which befalleth the sons of men befalleth beasts; even one thing befalleth them: as the one dieth, so dieth the other; yea, they have all one breath; so that a man hath no preeminence above a beast: for all is vanity. All go unto one place; all are of the dust, and all turn to dust again. Who knoweth the spirit of man that goeth upward, and the spirit of the beast that goeth downward to the earth?—Ecclesiastes iii., 19, 20, 21.

He that killeth an ox is as if he slew a man.—Isaiah lxvi., 3.

Then said Daniel to Melzar [the steward], whom the prince of the eunuchs had set over Daniel, Hananiah, Mishael, and Azariah: Prove thy servants, I beseech thee, ten days; and let them give us pulse to eat, and water to drink. Then let our countenances be looked upon before thee, and the countenance of the children that eat of the portion of the king's meat: and as thou seest, deal with thy servants. So he consented to them in this matter, and proved them ten days. And at the end of ten days their countenances appeared fairer and fatter in flesh than all the children which did eat the portion of the king's meat.—Daniel i., 11 to 17.



PREFACE.

I send this little book out into the world, first, to aid those who, having decided to adopt a bloodless diet, are still asking how they can be nourished without flesh; second, in the hope of gaining something further to protect "the speechless ones" who, having come down through the centuries under "the dominion of man," have in their eyes the mute, appealing look of the helpless and oppressed. Their eloquent silence should not ask our sympathy and aid in vain; they have a right, as our humble brothers, to our loving care and protection, and to demand justice and pity at our hands; and, as a part of the One Life, to—

"life, which all can take but none can give; Life, which all creatures love and strive to keep; Wonderful, dear, and pleasant unto each, Even to the meanest; yea, a boon to all Where pity is, for pity makes the world Soft to the weak and noble for the strong. Unto the dumb lips of the flock he lent Sad, pleading words, showing how man, who prays For mercy to the gods, is merciless, Being as god to those; albeit all life Is linked and kin, and what we slay have given Meek tribute of their milk and wool, and set Fast trust upon the hands which murder them."

If the cruelty and injustice to animals are nothing to us, we have still another argument to offer—the brutalization of the men who slaughter that we may eat flesh. Mrs. Besant, in "Why I Am a Food Reformer," says:

"Lately I have been in the city of Chicago—one of the greatest slaughter-houses of the world—where the slaughter-men, who are employed from early morn till late at night in the killing of thousands of these hapless creatures, are made a class practically apart from their fellow-men; they are marked out by the police as the most dangerous part of the community; amongst them are committed most crimes of violence, and the most ready use of the knife is found. One day I was speaking to an authority on this subject, and I asked him how it was that he knew so decidedly that most of the murders and the crimes with the knife were perpetrated by that particular class of men, and his answer was suggestive, although horrible. He said: 'There is a peculiar turn of the knife which men learn to use in the slaughter-house, for, as the living creatures are brought to them by machinery, these men slit their throats as they pass by. That twist of the wrist is the characteristic of most crimes with the knife committed amongst our Chicago population.' That struck me at once as both a horrible and significant fact. What right have people to condemn other men to a trade that makes them so readily take to the knife in anger; which marks them out as specially brutalized—brutes amongst their fellow-men? Being constantly in the sight and the smell of blood, their whole nature is coarsened; accustomed to kill thousands of creatures, they lose all sense of reverence for sentient life, they grow indifferent to the suffering they continually see around them; accustomed to inflict pain, they grow callous to the sight of pain; accustomed to kill swiftly, and sometimes not even waiting until the creature is dead before the skin is stripped from it, their nerves become coarsened, hardened, and brutalized, and they are less men as men because they are slaughterers of animals. And everyone who eats flesh meat has part in that brutalization; everyone who uses what they provide is guilty of this degradation of his fellow-men.

"If I may not appeal to you in the name of the animals—if under mistaken views you regard animals as not sharing your kind of life—then I appeal to you in the name of human brotherhood, and remind you of your duty to your fellow-men, your duty to your nation, which must be built up partly of the children of those who slaughter—who physically inherit the very signs of this brutalizing occupation. I ask you to recognize your duty as men and women who should raise the Race, not degrade it; who should try to make it divine, not brutal; who should try to make it pure, not foul; and therefore, in the name of Human Brotherhood, I appeal to you to leave your own tables free from the stain of blood and your consciences free from the degradation of your fellow-men."

That flesh-eating is not necessary to the perfect health of man is attested by many scientists. The following testimonies from some very prominent physiologists and anatomists may prove interesting:

Sir Charles Bell, F. R. S.: "It is, I think, not going too far to say that every fact connected with the human organization goes to prove that man was originally formed a frugivorous animal. This opinion is principally derived from the formation of his teeth and digestive organs, as well as from the character of his skin and the general structure of his limbs."

Sylvester Graham, M. D.: "Comparative anatomy proves that man is naturally a frugivorous animal, formed to subsist upon fruits, seeds, and farinaceous vegetables."

Professor Wm. Lawrence, F. R. S.: "The teeth of man have not the slightest resemblance to those of carnivorous animals; and, whether we consider the teeth, jaws, or digestive organs, the human structure closely resembles that of the frugivorous animals."

Dr. Jozef Drzewiecki: "There is no doubt that fruit and vegetable food purifies the blood, while meat inflames and is the source of many diseases, which are the punishment for breaking the natural law and command."

Professor Vogt: "The vegetarian diet is the most beneficial and agreeable to our organs, as it contains the greatest amount of carbon hydrates and the best proportion of albumen."

Sir Henry Thompson, M. D., F. R. C. S.: "It is a vulgar error to regard meat in any form as necessary to life. All that is necessary to the human body can be supplied by the vegetable kingdom.... The vegetarian can extract from his food all the principles necessary for the growth and support of the body, as well as for the production of heat and force. It must be admitted as a fact beyond all question that some persons are stronger and more healthy who live on that food. I know how much of the prevailing meat diet is not merely a wasteful extravagance, but a source of serious evil to the consumer."

The following special cablegram from London to the New York "Sun," July 3d, 1898, contains a practical illustration of the superiority of a vegetable diet:

"The vegetarians are making a great ado over the triumph of their theory in the long-distance test of walking endurance, seventy miles, in Germany, this week. The twenty-two starters included eight vegetarians. The distance had to be covered within eighteen hours. The first six to arrive were vegetarians, the first finishing in 14 1/4 hours, the second in 14 1/2, the third in 15 1/2, the fourth in 16, the fifth in 16 1/2, and the sixth in 17 1/2. The last two vegetarians missed their way and walked five miles more. All reached the goal in splendid condition. Not till one hour after the last vegetarian did the first meat-eater appear, completely exhausted. He was the only one. Others dropped off after thirty-five miles."

There is no question of the great economy of vegetarianism. Dr. Alcott, in "Arguments for Vegetarianism," says:

"Twenty-two acres of land are needed to sustain one man on fresh meat. Under wheat that land will feed forty-two people; under oats, eighty-eight; under potatoes, maize, or rice, one hundred and seventy-six; under the banana, over six thousand. The crowded nations of the future must abandon flesh-eating for a diet that will feed more than tenfold people by the same soil, expense and labor. How rich men will be when they cease to toll for flesh-meat, alcohol, drugs, sickness, and war!"

"Suffer the ox to plough, and impute his death to age and Nature's hand. Let the sheep continue to yield us sheltering wool, and the goats the produce of their loaded udders. Banish from among you nets and snares and painful artifices, Conspire no longer against the birds, nor scare the meek deer, nor hide with fraud the crooked hook; .... But let your mouths be empty of blood, and satisfied with pure and natural repasts."[1]

[1] Imputed to Pythagoras.



COMPARATIVE TABLES OF Vegetable and Animal FOODS.

IN 100 PARTS.

================================================================ Nitrogenous Hydro-carbonate Saline Water. Matter. Matter. Matter. - - - - Lean beef 19.3 3.6 5.1 72.0 - - - - Fat beef 14.8 29.8 4.4 51.0 - - - - Lean mutton 18.3 4.9 4.8 72.0 - - - - Fat mutton 12.4 31.1 3.5 53.0 - - - - Veal 16.5 15.8 4.7 63.0 - - - - Fat pork 9.8 48.9 2.3 39.0 - - - - Dried ham 8.8 73.3 2.9 15.0 - - - - Tripe 13.2 16.4 2.4 68.0 - - - - White fish 18.1 2.9 1.0 78.0 - - - - Red fish (salmon) 16.1 5.5 1.4 77.0 - - - - Oysters 14.010 1.515 2.695 80.385 - - - - Mussels 11.72 2.42 2.73 75.74 - - - - White of egg 20.4 ..... 1.6 78.0 - - - - Yolk of egg 16.0 30.7 1.3 52.0 - - - - Cow's milk (lactin) 4.1 3.9 0.8 86.0 - - - - Cream 2.7 26.7 1.8 66.0 - - - - Butter ..... 83.0 2.0 15.0 - - - - Gruyere cheese 31.5 24.0 3.0 40.0 - - - - Roquefort 26.52 30.14 5.07 34.55 - - - - Dutch 29.43 27.54 ..... 36.10 - - - - Chester 25.99 26.34 4.16 35.92 - - - - Parmesan 44.08 15.95 5.72 27.56 - - - - Cheddar 28.4 31.1 4.5 36.0 - - - -

IN 100 PARTS.

======================================================================== Carbohydrates. Nitrogenous Hydro-carbonate Saline Water. Matter. Matter. Matter. - - - - Beans 55.86 30.8 2.0 3.65 8.40 - - - - White haricots 55.7 25.5 2.8 3.2 9.9 - - - - Dried peas 58.7 23.8 2.1 2.1 8.3 - - - - Lentils 56.0 25.2 2.6 2.3 11.5 - - - - Potatoes 21.9 2.50 0.11 1.26 74.0 - - - - Black truffles 16.0 8.775 0.560 2.070 72.0 - - - - Mushrooms 3.0 4.680 0.396 0.458 91.010 - - - - Carrots 14.5 1.3 0.2 1.0 83.0 - - - - Sea-kale 2.8 2.4 ..... (?) 3.0 93.3 - - - - Turnips 7.2 1.1 ..... 0.6 91.0 - - - - Cabbage 5.8 2.0 0.5 0.7 91.0 - - - - Garden beet 13.5 .4 ..... (?) 1.0 82.2 - - - - Tomato 6.0 1.4 ..... (?) .8 89.8 - - - - Sweet potato 26.25 1.50 0.30 2.60 67.50 - - - - Water-cress 3.2 1.7 ..... (?) .7 93.1 - - - - Arrowroot 82.0 ..... ..... ..... 18.0 - - - - Dry southern wheat 67.112 22.75 2.61 3.02 ..... - - - - Dry common wheat 77.05 15.25 1.95 2.75 ..... - - - - Oat-meal 63.8 12.6 5.6 3.0 15.0 - - - - Barley-meal 74.3 6.3 2.4 2.0 15.0 - - - - Rye-meal 73.2 8.0 2.0 1.8 15.0 - - - - Dry maize 71.55 12.50 8.80 1.25 ..... - - - - Dry rice 89.65 7.55 0.80 0.90 ..... - - - - Buckwheat 64.90 13.10 3.0 2.50 13.0 - - - - Quinoa-meal 56.80 20.0 5.0 (?) 1.0 15.0 - - - - Dhoorra-meal 74.0 9.0 2.6 2.3 ..... - - - - Dried figs 65.9 6.1 0.9 2.3 17.5 - - - - Dates 65.3 6.6 0.2 1.6 20.8 - - - - Bananas (?)19.0 4.820 0.632 0.791 73.900 - - - - Walnuts (peeled) 8.9 12.5 31.6 (?) 1.7 44.5 - - - - Filberts 11.1 8.4 28.5 (?) 1.5 48.0 - - - - Ground-nuts (peeled) 11.7 24.5 50.0 (?) 1.8 7.5 - - - - Cocoa-nut 8.1 5.5 35.9 (?) 1.0 46.6 - - - - Fresh chestnuts (peeled) 42.7 3.0 2.5 (?) 1.8 49.2 - - - - Locust bean 67.9 7.1 1.1 (?) 2.9 14.6 - - - - Cocoa-nibs } 11.10 21.20 50.0 3.0 12.0 Chocolate } - - - -

The analyses are those of Fresenius, Letheby, Pavy, Church, and others. From "The Perfect Way in Diet."

"O Golden Age, whose light is of the dawn, And not of sunset, forward, not behind, Flood the new heavens and earth, and with thee bring All the old virtues, whatsoever things Are pure and honest and of good repute, But add thereto whatever bard has sung Or seer has told of when in trance or dream They saw the Happy Isles of prophecy! Let Justice hold her scale, and Truth divide Between the right and wrong; but give the heart The freedom of its fair inheritance."

—WHITTIER.



Bread, Biscuit, and Rolls.

BEATEN BISCUIT.—No. 1.

One quart of flour, two teaspoonfuls of baking powder sifted with the flour, a quarter of a teaspoonful of salt, a large heaping tablespoonful of butter, milk enough to make a stiff dough. Beat with a rolling pin or in a biscuit-beater for ten or fifteen minutes until the dough blisters. Roll out about half an inch thick or less, prick well with a fork and bake in a quick oven.

BEATEN BISCUIT.—No. 2.

Two quarts of flour, three ounces of butter, a little salt and enough water to make a stiff dough. Beat with a rolling pin or in a biscuit-beater twenty minutes until the dough blisters or snaps. Roll out about half an inch thick, prick well with a fork and bake in a quick oven. This dough rolled very thin, cut with a large cutter, pricked well and baked in a quick oven makes delicious wafers to serve with tea or chocolate.

BAKING-POWDER BISCUIT.

One quart of sifted flour, three-quarters of a cup of butter, two heaping teaspoonfuls of baking powder, one teaspoonful of salt, enough milk to make a soft dough. Do not handle any more than is necessary. Roll thin, cut in small biscuits, prick with a fork and bake in a quick oven.

CREAM BISCUIT.

One quart of flour sifted, two rounded teaspoonfuls of Cleveland's baking powder, two cupfuls of cream and a little salt. Mix, roll out about a quarter of an inch thick, cut with a small biscuit-cutter, prick with a fork and bake fifteen or twenty minutes in a quick oven.

FRENCH ROLLS.

Two quarts of sifted flour, a pint of warm milk, half a cup of butter melted in the milk, a quarter of a cup of sugar, three or four eggs beaten light, a little salt, a half cake of compressed yeast, dissolved in a little warm milk. Make a batter of the milk and flour, add the eggs and sugar, beat hard for fifteen minutes. Cover the pan and set to rise, over night if for luncheon, in the morning if for tea. Knead well, but do not add any more flour. Make them into shape and let them rise again until light. Bake about fifteen minutes in a quick oven. For buns add cinnamon. Sift the flour before measuring, and measure lightly.

RAISED FINGER-ROLLS.

Half a pint of milk, half a pint of water, one-third of a compressed yeast cake, one teaspoonful of sugar, two teaspoonfuls of butter, one teaspoonful of salt. Dissolve the yeast cake in a little tepid water, mix as usual, make into a soft dough at night, bake for breakfast or luncheon.

WINDSOR ROLLS.

Melt half a cup of butter in three-quarters of a pint of warm milk, dissolve one cake of compressed yeast in a little tepid milk, stir together and add a teaspoonful of salt and enough flour to make like bread dough, set to rise in a warm place. It will rise in about two hours. Roll out the dough, using as little flour as possible to keep it from sticking, and cut with a biscuit-cutter, or mould with the hands into rolls, put them in pans, and set on the shelf over the range to rise about ten or fifteen minutes. Bake fifteen or twenty minutes.

ELIZABETTI ROLLS.

One cup of sweet milk, half a yeast cake, an even tablespoonful of butter, two teaspoonfuls of sugar, and one of salt, and flour enough to make as stiff as bread dough. Scald the milk and melt the butter in it, when lukewarm dissolve the yeast cake, sugar and salt and stir the flour in until as thick as bread dough. Set to rise over night. In the morning roll thin, cut with a biscuit-cutter, put a tiny lump of butter on each biscuit, fold in half, set to rise again, and when light bake about twenty minutes in a moderate oven. This quantity will make twenty-four rolls.

RYE ROLLS.

Take in the morning from rye bread dough one cupful, add to it a tablespoonful of Porto Rico molasses, one tablespoonful of sour cream, one even tablespoonful of butter. Bake in cups, half fill them, set in a warm place to rise for three-quarters of an hour, and bake fifteen minutes. This quantity will make eight.

GLUTEN ROLLS.

Three cups of kernel flour, two even tablespoonfuls of baking powder, half a teaspoonful of salt, two cups of milk. Mix the flour, salt and baking powder together, then stir in the milk, beat well. If baked in iron roll pans heat them well, brush with butter; if granite ware, only grease them. This quantity will make sixteen rolls. Bake from twenty to twenty-five minutes.

PARKER HOUSE ROLLS.

Sift two cups of flour with half a teaspoonful of salt and one teaspoonful of sugar, then add a cup of tepid water in which a cake of compressed yeast has been dissolved, two tablespoonfuls of melted butter; when mixed break in one egg and add flour enough to make a soft dough. Knead well, beating the dough upon the board. Set to rise in a warm place, when light knead again, adding only enough flour to keep from sticking to the board, roll out about half an inch thick, cut with a biscuit-cutter, brush with melted butter, fold in half and set to rise again. These rolls can be set at noon if for tea, or in the morning if for luncheon, or they can be made up at night for breakfast, when use only half a yeast cake. This dough can be moulded into small, oblong rolls for afternoon teas.

BOSTON BROWN BREAD.

One cup of yellow corn meal, one cup and a half of Graham flour, an even teaspoonful of salt, an even teaspoonful of soda, two cups of sour milk, half a cup of Porto Rico molasses, and butter the size of a large walnut. Sift the corn meal and soda together, add the Graham flour and salt, then the milk and molasses, melt the butter and stir in at the last. Butter a brown bread mould, pour in the mixture, steam for three hours, keep the water steadily boiling, remove the cover of the mould, and bake twenty minutes in the oven to form a crust.

BOSTON BROWN BREAD WITH RAISINS.

Follow the preceding recipe, adding a cup of raisins stoned and slightly chopped. Very nice for nut sandwiches and stewed bread.

BOSTON BROWN BREAD STEWED.

Cut the bread into dice, and when the milk boils add the bread and stew gently fifteen minutes. The proportion is about a cup of milk to one of bread.

GRAHAM BREAD.

Half a pint of milk, half a pint of water, a pint and a half of white flour, an even teaspoonful of salt, half a yeast cake dissolved in tepid water. Scald the milk and add the half pint of boiling water, set away to cool. Put the flour into the bread pan, add milk and water when lukewarm and the dissolved yeast; beat well. In the morning add half a cup of Porto Rico molasses and Graham flour enough to knead well, let it rise for three hours, knead again, make into loaves and set in a warm place to rise. When light bake in a moderate oven nearly an hour.

RYE BREAD.

Dissolve half a yeast cake, two heaping teaspoonfuls of sugar and one of salt in a cup and a third of tepid water, then stir into it a pint of white flour, and when smooth add enough rye flour to make a dough rather stiffer than that of white bread. Knead thoroughly about fifteen minutes and set to rise. In the morning make into a loaf and put in a crusty bread pan.

QUICK WHITE BREAD.

Three pints of flour, an even teaspoonful of salt, two cakes of compressed yeast dissolved in tepid water and enough milk to make a soft dough. Set in the morning,—it will require about an hour and a half to rise, and, after making into loaves, about ten minutes.

DATE BREAD.

Break the dates apart, wash and drain them in a colander, shake them well, set in a warm place to dry. Stone and chop enough to make a cupful, and knead into a loaf of white bread just before setting to rise for the last time.

COFFEE BREAD.—No. 1.

One pound of flour, two eggs, six tablespoonfuls of melted butter, six ounces of sugar, a teaspoonful of soda, a teaspoonful of cream of tartar mixed dry in the flour, and one cup and a half of milk. Beat the butter and sugar together, add the eggs well beaten, a few grains of cardamom, half a cupful of raisins seeded, and a tablespoonful of citron cut fine, if liked, then add the milk and flour. Bake in crusty bread pans or shallow pans, as convenient.

COFFEE BREAD.—No. 2.

Half a pound of flour, one egg, two teaspoonfuls of sugar, a small pinch of salt, three tablespoonfuls of melted butter, three-quarters of a cup of milk, one even teaspoonful of soda, two scant teaspoonfuls of cream of tartar. Mix and bake in a crusty bread pan in a good oven, not too quick, from twenty to twenty-five minutes.

NORWEGIAN ROLLS.

Two pounds and a half of flour, a pint and a half of milk, half a pound of butter, six ounces of sugar, one even teaspoonful of cardamom seeds pounded fine, and one cake of compressed yeast. Melt the butter in the milk, mix the sugar, flour and cardamom together and stir the butter and milk into it with the yeast cake dissolved in a little milk, mix thoroughly and set to rise. When it is nicely raised, roll out the dough and cut with a biscuit-cutter, put in pans to rise again,—if they can be raised over steam it is better. When light bake in a quick oven. If zwieback are wanted, cut the biscuit in half when cold and set them in the oven to brown. If wanted very nice, brush each half over with white of egg and sprinkle with sugar and chopped almonds. The cardamom seed may be omitted if not liked.

RICE MUFFINS.

Boil a scant half cup of rice in salted water half an hour, drain well, and measure out four heaping tablespoonfuls of it into a mixing bowl. Stir into it while hot a heaping tablespoonful of butter. Beat one egg light, add to the rice and butter with a little salt, sift half a pint of flour with half a teaspoonful of baking powder, and stir in alternately with half a pint of milk. Pour the mixture into muffin rings or gem pans, which must be heated thoroughly and well buttered. Bake about twenty minutes.

LAPLANDS.

Half a pint of flour, half a pint of rich milk, a quarter of a teaspoonful of salt, three eggs beaten separately and very light. Mix the flour, salt and milk together, then the yolks of eggs, and lastly the whites of eggs beaten to a stiff froth. Have a gem pan very hot, butter well and fill with the batter and bake in a quick oven twelve to fifteen minutes. This quantity will make fourteen gems.

ENGLISH MUFFINS.

Half a pint of hot milk, half a pint of hot water, half a yeast cake, an even teaspoonful of salt and one of sugar, and about a pound and a half of white flour. Dissolve the yeast cake in a little tepid water and add to the batter when lukewarm. The milk and water mixed must be stirred into the flour while hot. Beat the batter very hard, ten or fifteen minutes; it should be a soft dough. Set to rise over night. Flour the board well, drop the dough in large spoonfuls in the flour, flatten with the hands and form into shape. Let them rise on the board in a warm place, and when light bake on a griddle, heated only half as hot as for griddle cakes. Flour the muffins and bake slowly on one side six minutes; then turn and bake the same on the other side. They are very nice split and toasted and buttered immediately and put together again.

GRAHAM POPOVERS.

Beat three eggs very light, and add to them one tablespoonful of sugar, one pint of milk, a saltspoonful of salt. Put in a mixing bowl half a pint each of Graham and white flour, stir the eggs and milk gradually into this and beat until perfectly smooth. Then add one tablespoonful of melted butter and beat again for some minutes. Brush the cups over with melted butter; if they are of iron heat them, half fill with the batter and bake in a quick oven fifty minutes at least.

GRAHAM GEMS.

To one quart of sweet milk, four cups of Graham flour, a teaspoonful of salt. Stir together and beat well, the longer the better. Have the gem pans very hot, brush well with butter, half fill them with the batter and bake thirty-five minutes.

GEMS OF KERNEL (Middlings) AND WHITE FLOUR.

Two cups of kernel flour, two cups of white flour, four cups of milk or two of milk and two of water, one egg; a little salt, a heaping teaspoonful of sugar, two teaspoonfuls of baking powder, two large tablespoonfuls of melted butter. Beat the egg very light in a bowl, add the sugar and salt, the milk and butter, sift the flour together and beat the batter hard for a few minutes. Have the iron gem pans very hot, butter and fill, and bake them in a good, quick oven not less than thirty-five minutes.

GEMS OF RYE MEAL.

Mix together three-quarters of a cup of rye meal and a quarter of a cup of white flour and a saltspoonful of salt. Beat two egg yolks and stir into it a cup of sweet milk and one tablespoonful of granulated sugar, add this to the rye meal and flour, beat hard, then add the whites of two eggs beaten to a stiff froth. Heat the iron gem pans, brush with butter and bake thirty-five to forty minutes.

CORN BATTER BREAD.

Pour a pint of boiling milk over four heaping tablespoonfuls of yellow corn meal, add a heaping teaspoonful of butter, a heaping teaspoonful of sugar, and a little salt. Beat the yolks of three eggs to a cream and add to the batter, then the whites of three eggs beaten to a stiff froth. Butter a pudding dish, turn the mixture into it and bake from twenty-five to thirty minutes. Serve immediately in the dish in which it is baked.

CORN BREAD.

Put half a pint of yellow corn meal in a mixing bowl, pour over it one pint of rich, sweet milk. When cold add two tablespoonfuls of melted butter, half a teaspoonful of salt, one teaspoonful of sugar and four eggs beaten separately, the whites beaten to a stiff froth and added at the last. Pour into a well-buttered shallow pan and bake about half an hour in a good oven.

CORN GRIDDLE CAKES.

One cup of yellow corn meal in a mixing bowl, pour over it three cups of boiling milk. When cold add two tablespoonfuls of melted butter, two teaspoonfuls of sugar, one teaspoonful of salt. Sift one teaspoonful of cream of tartar and half a teaspoonful of soda with half a cup of white flour, add to the batter and at the last mix in two well-beaten eggs.

WHITE BREAD GRIDDLE CAKES.

Chop as much stale bread as will measure two cupfuls, put it into a bowl and pour over it a cupful of sweet, rich milk, let it soak for an hour. When ready to bake the cakes, mash the bread in the milk with a wooden spoon, add a heaping teaspoonful of sugar, a teaspoonful of salt, two tablespoonfuls of melted butter, two well-beaten eggs, sift into the mixture a cupful of white flour and an even teaspoonful of soda, stir well together, then add a cupful of sour milk and bake on a griddle.

BOSTON BROWN BREAD GRIDDLE CAKES.

Crumble enough Boston brown bread to make two cupfuls, pour over it a cup of sweet milk, soak an hour. Then mash fine in the milk, add two tablespoonfuls of melted butter, an even teaspoonful of salt, two well-beaten eggs, and sift into the mixture a cupful of white flour and a heaping teaspoonful of baking powder, beat well; then add a scant half cup of milk and bake as other griddle cakes.

WAFFLES.

Put a quart of milk to warm, melt a quarter of a pound of butter in it and stir in a teaspoonful of salt. When cold add a pint of sifted flour, four eggs, the whites and yolks beaten separately, and just before baking stir in two teaspoonfuls of baking powder.

EPICUREAN ROLLS.

Boil several potatoes and put them through a vegetable press or else grate them, measure one cupful, one tablespoonful of sugar, half a yeast cake dissolved in half a cup of tepid water, half a pint of milk, half a cup of butter, one egg beaten separately, half a teaspoonful of salt, and flour enough to make a soft dough. Set to rise at night. Pour a third of a cup of boiling water over the potato, salt and sugar. Beat smooth, and when tepid add the yeast, cover and set away to rise. In the morning bring the milk to a boil, and melt the butter in it; when cool enough add the beaten yolk and stir all into the potato sponge, beat the white of egg to a stiff froth and add to the other ingredients, with flour enough to make a soft dough; knead well and let it rise again; when very light roll out about half an inch thick, cut with a round biscuit-cutter, prick them with a fork, put in pans for a short time to rise and bake from fifteen to twenty minutes. The most delicate and delicious of rolls.

BREAD FROM RUMMER FLOUR.

Two quarts of improved Graham flour, half a pint of boiling water, half a pint of lukewarm water, one-fourth of a yeast cake dissolved in half a pint of lukewarm water, one tablespoonful of granulated sugar added when kneading the dough, one teaspoonful of salt. Put the salt in the flour, make a hole, pour in the boiling water, then the lukewarm water, and last the yeast. Knead well at night at least fifteen minutes, set to rise. In the morning mould into loaves, let it rise until very light and bake until well done.

BISCUITS OF KERNEL OR GRAHAM FLOUR.

Follow the recipe for baking powder biscuits, using kernel or Graham flour instead of white flour. If Graham is used sift twice before adding the baking powder. Roll thin, cut with a biscuit-cutter, prick with a fork and bake in a quick oven.



Eggs.

TO SOFT BOIL EGGS.

Cover the eggs with cold water in a saucepan, place over the fire, and when the water comes to the boiling point the eggs are perfectly cooked; remove at once and serve.

TO HARD BOIL EGGS.

Put the eggs in boiling water and boil hard for ten minutes, set them where they will boil gently for ten minutes more, then remove from the fire. Eggs boiled in this way will be tender and digestible.

EGGS A LA CREME.

Boil twelve eggs fifteen minutes. Line a dish with very thin slices of bread and fill with layer of eggs cut in slices, strewing them with a little grated bread, pepper and salt; rub a quarter of a pound of butter with two tablespoonfuls of flour, put it in a saucepan with a tablespoonful of chopped parsley, a little onion grated, salt, pepper and half a pint of milk or cream; when hot pour over the eggs; cover the top with grated bread crumbs and put it in the oven, let it heat thoroughly and brown.

EGGS AU GRATIN.

Boil twelve eggs hard, shell and cut them in slices and lay them in a deep dish in close circular rows; make a sauce of a tablespoonful of butter, the yolks of four eggs, a little grated cheese, and half a pint of milk; stir this over the fire until it thickens, pour it over the eggs, strew some bread crumbs on top and bake for ten minutes.

NUN'S TOAST.

Cut four or five hard boiled eggs into thin slices; put a piece of butter half the size of an egg in a saucepan, and when it begins to bubble add a teaspoonful of grated onion; let it cook a little without taking color, then stir in a teaspoonful of flour and a cupful of milk and stir until smooth; add pepper and salt to taste, then put in the slices of egg and let them get hot. Have ready some neatly trimmed slices of buttered toast, pour the mixture over them and serve at once.

EGGS A LA MAITRE D'HOTEL.

One-quarter of a pound of fresh butter, half a pint of milk, one tablespoonful of flour, one tablespoonful of minced parsley, half a teaspoonful of onion juice, one-fourth of a teaspoonful of white pepper, salt to taste, the juice of half a lemon, and eight hard boiled eggs. Stir the flour and half of the butter in a saucepan over the fire until the mixture thickens, stir in the milk; when hot add the pepper and let it simmer a minute; cream the rest of the butter and beat in the lemon, onion juice and parsley; cut the eggs in quarters lengthwise, add the creamed butter to that in the saucepan, allow it to heat thoroughly, pour over the eggs and serve.

EGG TIMBALES.

For six persons use half a dozen eggs, three gills of milk, one teaspoonful of salt, one-eighth of a teaspoonful of pepper, one teaspoonful of chopped parsley, and one-fourth of a teaspoonful of onion juice, if liked. Break the eggs into a bowl and beat well with a fork, then add the seasoning and beat for a minute longer; now add the milk and stir well; butter well medium sized timbale moulds, one for each person, pour the mixture into them; put the moulds in a deep pan and pour in enough hot water to come almost to the top of the moulds. Place in a moderate oven and cook until firm in the center—for about twenty minutes—then turn out on a warm dish and pour cream or tomato sauce around them.

EGGS STUFFED WITH MUSHROOMS.

Boil half a dozen eggs hard; when done pour cold water over them, shell and cut in half lengthwise; take out the yolks, mash them and add three ounces of fresh mushrooms that have been chopped very fine and cooked tender in a teaspoonful of butter; season with salt and pepper to taste and stir in a dessertspoonful of cream, mix thoroughly. Fill the whites with this mixture, rounding the top to the shape and size of a whole yolk; sift some fine bread crumbs over the top and tiny bits of butter, brown a moment in the oven. Arrange on a dish and pour a white sauce around them in which an ounce of chopped and cooked mushrooms has been stirred, garnish with parsley and serve.

EGGS WITH CREAM.

Melt a small lump of butter in a shallow baking dish and break into it carefully six eggs, pour over them a third of a cup of boiling cream, place in a very quick oven long enough to set the whites of eggs and serve at once in the dish in which they are baked. Two or three minutes will cook them.

CURRIED EGGS.

Boil six eggs hard, cut in half lengthwise, make a white sauce and stir into it a heaping teaspoonful of curry powder; put the eggs carefully into this sauce, heat thoroughly, lift them out and place in the center of a dish. Arrange boiled rice around them, pour the sauce over the eggs, garnish with parsley and serve.

STUFFED EGGS.

Boil six eggs hard, cut in half lengthwise, take out the yolks and mash them very fine; put aside a heaping teaspoonful of it, add to the rest two teaspoonfuls of butter, three teaspoonfuls of rich cream, a few drops of onion juice, and salt and pepper to taste; mix well, fill the whites of eggs, rounding the top of each to the size of a whole egg. Make a white sauce as follows: Rub a heaping tablespoonful of butter into half a tablespoonful of flour, and stir into it a cup of boiling milk; when it is smooth and thick put the eggs into it carefully, when hot take them out, arrange daintily on a platter, pour the sauce around them, sprinkle the teaspoonful of the yolk reserved over them, garnish with parsley and serve.

FRIED STUFFED EGGS.

Prepare the eggs as in the recipe for stuffed eggs, filling the cavity of the whites evenly, and pressing the two halves together so as to make it appear as a whole egg. Take what is left of the mixture, add to it one raw egg beaten light, roll each egg in this, covering thoroughly every part of it, and fry in boiling fat. Serve around a dish of green peas, or with a cream sauce into which has been stirred, just before removing from the fire, two slightly heaping tablespoonfuls of grated Parmesan cheese.

FRICASSEED EGGS.

Put two tablespoonfuls of butter in a spider, when hot add a tablespoonful of flour, stir until smooth, then add a teaspoonful of finely minced parsley and a heaping tablespoonful of fresh mushrooms chopped very fine, and a cup of rich milk or cream. Cook until the mushrooms are tender, then add four or five hard-boiled eggs cut in quarters lengthwise; let it come to a boil and serve.

EGG CHOPS.

Take five or six hard-boiled eggs, rub the yolks through a sieve and chop the whites rather fine; put a cupful of milk in a saucepan over the fire, when hot stir into it a tablespoonful of butter rubbed smooth in two tablespoonfuls of flour with one raw egg, first adding a little of the warm milk, then pepper and salt to taste, and if liked a few drops of onion juice. Stir constantly until thick and smooth, remove from the fire, add the prepared eggs, mix well, and when cold form into the shape of chops, dip in beaten egg and fine bread crumbs and fry in boiling fat until a delicate brown; stick a sprig of parsley in the small end of each chop, arrange in the middle of a platter and serve with a white sauce around them, or green peas.

PLAIN OMELET.

Beat six eggs, the yolks to a cream, the whites to a stiff froth, add three tablespoonfuls of warm milk to the yolks and then beat into the whites of eggs. Put a small tablespoonful of butter in a spider, when it is hot turn the eggs into it, stirring gently all the time until the eggs are well set; let it brown, fold and turn out on a hot platter.

OMELET WITH CHEESE.

Follow the recipe for plain omelet; while it is cooking stir in three tablespoonfuls of grated Parmesan cheese and finish as above.

OMELET WITH MUSHROOMS.

Make an omelet as in preceding recipe. Have a quarter of a pound of fresh mushrooms chopped fine and cooked until tender in a little butter and their own juice, seasoned with salt and pepper, and add hot to the omelet just before folding it.

OMELET WITH TOMATOES.

A cup of tomatoes, the water drained from them, cooked and seasoned with pepper and salt, a teaspoonful of onion juice, and one of green pepper chopped very fine; have it hot and add to the omelet just before folding it.

POACHED EGGS WITH TOMATO CATSUP.

Poach some eggs in boiling water, trim nicely and place each egg on a round of toast buttered and moistened with a little hot milk. Have ready a white sauce, pour it over them and put on the top of each egg a teaspoonful of tomato catsup; garnish with parsley and serve.

EGGS POACHED IN CREAM.

Half a pint of cream, six eggs, salt and white pepper, and a small teaspoonful of finely minced parsley. Bring the cream to a boil in a chafing dish, break the eggs carefully, to keep the yolks whole, into the cream and cook until the whites are set—about three minutes. Have a delicate slice of toast for each egg on hot plates, lay an egg on each, pour the cream over them, sprinkle with pepper and salt and the chopped parsley and serve.

EGGS POACHED IN TOMATOES.

Put a quart can of tomatoes in a saucepan over the fire with half an onion, three cloves, a bay leaf, a sprig of parsley, a saltspoonful of sugar, and salt and pepper to taste. Cook until the onion is tender—about ten minutes—remove from the fire, press through a sieve fine enough to retain the seeds. Put this in a spider; rub an even teaspoonful of potato flour with a tablespoonful of butter, add to the sauce, and when it boils break in as many eggs as required, keep them from sticking to the pan by running a tablespoon carefully around the edges; when the eggs are set remove from the sauce, place each one on a round of nice toast and pour the sauce around them; garnish with parsley and serve.

EGGS IN A BROWN SAUCE.

Boil hard as many eggs as needed and cut either lengthwise in quarters or in round slices. Brown a tablespoonful of butter and one of flour together, add a small onion, cut fine; when thick and smooth add enough vegetable stock to make the sauce the proper consistency, season with salt and pepper and strain. Put the egg slices in the sauce, let it come to the boiling point and serve on a small platter; garnish with parsley. Half a dozen olives boiled in a little water and cut from the stones are a nice addition to the sauce.



Soups.

Bran tea, made in the proportion of a pint of bran to three quarts of water, is used by many vegetarians as a foundation for soup. Butter should be used generously with it.

A broth made from white beans is also good where a white stock is required. Pick over the beans carefully, soak over night, drain and add fresh water in the morning—three pints of water to a pint of beans—cook gently until tender. If it is to be used as a stock, strain without mashing the beans. If the water they are boiled in is hard, a small pinch of soda will soften it.

CREAM OF JERUSALEM ARTICHOKES.

Wash and peel enough artichokes to make a pint when cut in slices. Put them in a saucepan with a tablespoonful of butter, let them simmer in this for a few minutes without taking color, then cover with water and boil until tender. Rub through a sieve, put back on the stove with a quart of milk, and a tablespoonful of butter rubbed into a tablespoonful—slightly heaping—of flour, season to taste with salt and pepper, let it come to a boil. Remove from the fire and add two egg yolks, beaten with half a cup of cream, stir rapidly, and serve at once.

CREAM OF ASPARAGUS.

Prepare a bunch of asparagus in the usual way for cooking, cut off the points about an inch in length and put aside. Cover the stalks and half an onion cut in slices, with boiling water, cook until tender and press through a puree sieve with the water they were boiled in. Melt a good tablespoonful of butter in a saucepan, and stir into it half a tablespoonful of flour, add the puree of asparagus and let it come to a boil, season with salt and pepper to taste. Have the asparagus points cooked tender in a little water. Have ready a pint of boiling milk, remove both from the fire and stir the milk into the soup, put the asparagus points into the tureen. Beat two egg yolks with four tablespoonfuls of cream, stir quickly into the soup and pour into the tureen.

CREAM OF LIMA BEANS.

Put over the fire a quart of lima beans in boiling water to cover them; when nearly tender add a bay leaf, half a white onion, and salt and white pepper to taste. Let them cook until very tender, remove from the fire, and mash through a colander with the water in which they were boiled. Put back in the saucepan on the range, let it come to a boil, then add a heaping tablespoonful of butter and a pint of boiling milk, stir well, remove and press through a puree sieve that it may be smooth. Beat four tablespoonfuls of cream, add when the soup is in the tureen and serve immediately. This soup is very nice when made from the best canned lima beans, using two cans and following the recipe as above.

CREAM OF CAULIFLOWER.

Cut one small cauliflower into flowerettes, reserve a tablespoonful, put the rest into a saucepan with three cups of boiling water, one small white onion, half a small celeriac cut in slices, and a bay leaf. Cook together ten minutes, drain and put the vegetables into a double boiler with two heaping tablespoonfuls of butter, a heaping tablespoonful of flour, salt and pepper to taste; steam for ten minutes. Put the flowerettes into the water the vegetables were boiled in and cook until tender, remove and put aside to keep warm, measure the water and add sufficient from the kettle to make two cupfuls, pour this over the vegetables, cook until tender and press through a fine sieve. Bring two cups of milk to the boiling point, turn the puree into this, let it boil up once, remove from the fire. Beat two egg yolks and four tablespoonfuls of rich cream together, add some of the soup to this, then mix all together, turn into the tureen, add the flowerettes and serve at once.

CREAM OF CELERY.

Take of the coarser parts of celery as much as will make two heads, wash and cut in pieces, put in a saucepan with half an onion cut in slices and cover with boiling water. Cook until tender and press through a sieve with the water in which it was boiled. Make a roux of butter and flour as in other cream soups, add the puree to it and as much boiling milk as will make it the proper consistency. Season with salt and pepper, and finish with a beaten egg yolk and two tablespoonfuls of cream, adding this after the soup has been removed from the fire.

CREAM OF CHESTNUTS.

Shell and blanch a pint of large French chestnuts. Put them in a saucepan and almost cover them with boiling water, cook until tender. Before they are quite done add a little salt. When done remove from the fire, rub through a puree sieve with the water they were boiled in. Melt a generous heaping tablespoonful of butter with an even tablespoonful of flour and add to it by degrees a pint of boiling milk, let it cook until thick, then stir in the chestnut puree and salt and pepper to taste. Let it come to a boil and serve.

CREAM OF CUCUMBERS.

Peel and cut into slices four cucumbers and one small white onion, put in a saucepan with enough boiling water to cover them, cook until tender, press through a fine sieve and pour into a saucepan, stand where it will keep hot without cooking. Have a cream sauce ready, made by melting two heaping tablespoonfuls of butter in a saucepan with two tablespoonfuls of flour, let them cook together until the mixture no longer adheres to the pan, then add gradually a quart of milk, an even teaspoonful of white pepper, a heaping teaspoonful of salt, let it boil for a few minutes until thick and pour into the cucumber puree, add two tablespoonfuls of rich cream, let it come to the boiling point, and serve at once. This is a very delicate soup, and cooking or standing on the stove after it is done will spoil it. Groult's potato flour is nicer for thickening cream soups than the common flour, but, if used, only half the quantity called for in the recipes is needed.

CREAM OF SUMMER SQUASH.

Peel the squash, slice thin, put in a saucepan and add boiling water to come nearly to the top of the squash. When nearly tender add an onion, a bay leaf and several sprigs of parsley. When tender mash through a fine sieve, return to the fire, let it come to a boil, stir in a heaping tablespoonful of butter, a heaping teaspoonful of flour, season with salt and pepper and a tiny pinch of mace. Have almost as much boiling milk as puree, remove from the fire and stir together, add two tablespoonfuls of cream, and serve at once.

CREAM OF LETTUCE.

Take two heads of nice, fresh lettuce, wash and drain and chop fine with half a small white onion, put in a saucepan with two heaping tablespoonfuls of butter, cook for about ten minutes, stirring all the time, then add two heaping tablespoonfuls of rice and a quart of milk. Let it boil for twenty minutes until the rice is perfectly tender, remove from the fire and press through a puree sieve, using a small potato masher, then strain and press again through a fine hair sieve; this will make it smooth. Season with salt to taste and a dash of cayenne pepper, and a small half teaspoonful of sugar. Put in a fresh saucepan, rub together two heaping teaspoonfuls of butter and an even teaspoonful of cornstarch and stir into the soup. Let it come to the boiling point and remove from the fire, adding at the last moment a quarter of a cupful of whipped cream. Serve with or without fried croutons.

CREAM OF MUSHROOMS.

Wash one pound of mushrooms, skin and stem them. Put the skins and stems in a saucepan with a cup of boiling water and boil ten minutes, strain and add to this water the mushroom flaps chopped very fine, and cook until tender, then press through a fine sieve. Melt two large heaping tablespoonfuls of butter in a saucepan, and stir into it two heaping tablespoonfuls of flour, and when smooth add a quart of rich milk, a whole clove of garlic, salt and pepper to taste. When it boils and thickens add the mushroom stock, let it boil up once, remove the clove of garlic, turn the soup into the tureen and serve.

CREAM OF GREEN PEAS.

Put a quart of green peas into a saucepan with a slice of white onion, cover with boiling water and cook until tender. Remove from the fire and press through a puree sieve with the water in which they were boiled. Return to the saucepan, set it back on the stove, let it come to a boil, add a pint of rich milk, salt and white pepper to taste, a dash of cayenne, and a large, generous tablespoonful of butter rubbed into an even tablespoonful of flour, adding a little of the liquid before stirring into the soup. Let it come to a boil, and add two tablespoonfuls of whipped cream just as it is poured into the tureen.

CREAM OF RICE.

Wash carefully a third of a cup of rice and put it on the fire in a pint of boiling water with a white onion and a stick of celery, let it cook slowly for an hour, then stir in a quart of milk and let it come to a boil, add a heaping tablespoonful of butter, and press through a puree sieve. Put the soup back on the fire while beating an egg yolk with two tablespoonfuls of cream and a teaspoonful of parsley minced very fine. Remove the soup from the fire, stir in the egg and cream, pour into the tureen and serve.

CREAM OF SPINACH.

Take two large handfuls of spinach, after it is washed and picked over, a small head of lettuce, a few sprigs of parsley, and a small white onion peeled and sliced. Put in a saucepan over the fire with a tablespoonful of butter, a dozen peppercorns and two cloves, and a very little boiling water, cover and stand it where the vegetables will only simmer. When they are tender rub together a generous heaping tablespoonful of butter and a heaping tablespoonful of flour, and stir it into the vegetables. Add a little boiling water, mash the vegetables smooth and press them through a fine sieve. Have the puree as thick as possible, return to the saucepan. Have ready a pint of boiling milk, beat two egg yolks with four tablespoonfuls of cream, pour a little of the boiling milk into them, and the rest into the puree, remove from the fire at once, then add the eggs and cream, pour into the tureen and serve immediately.

CARROT SOUP.

Take half a dozen small French carrots, wash and scrape them, put in a saucepan with boiling water and cook until tender, remove from the fire, mix with milk and press through a sieve. Melt two ounces of butter in a saucepan and rub into it a slightly heaping tablespoonful of flour, add a few grains of cayenne pepper, and stir in a little at a time the carrot puree until smooth like cream, add a few slices of cooked celery root (celeriac), and salt to taste, and pour into the puree. A tablespoonful of sherry, if liked, may be added. Serve with fried croutons.

CELERIAC SOUP.

Wash, peel and slice three celery roots, put them in a saucepan, cover with boiling water, cook until tender, and mash them through a puree sieve with the water in which they were boiled. Melt a good heaping tablespoonful of butter, stir into it a small tablespoonful of flour, and add to it the celery puree, season with a little cayenne pepper and salt to taste. Add three-quarters of a cup of macaroni previously boiled in water. As soon as it comes to a boil remove from the fire and add as much boiling milk as will make it the proper consistency. Beat two egg yolks with half a cup of cream and stir in quickly just before pouring the soup into the tureen. Care must be taken to do this off the fire, as celery soup is liable to curdle.

MOCK CLAM SOUP.

Soak a pint of marrowfat beans over night in water enough to cover them. In the morning drain, and put them on the fire with a small onion and a gallon of cold water, boil until tender and strain. Add to the stock a little summer savory, two ounces of butter and a cup of cream or rich milk, season with salt and pepper. When the soup comes to a boil, cut two slices of toast into dice, and four hard-boiled eggs in slices, put in the tureen and pour the soup over them and serve.

CORN AND TOMATO SOUP.

Grate the corn from six ears of sweet corn. Put the cobs into a quart and a pint of water and cook until all the sweetness is extracted—about half an hour. Remove the cobs and add a pint of tomatoes after they are skinned and sliced, a small onion cut in slices, a French carrot cut in dice, a quarter of a green pepper chopped fine, and the grated corn. Let it cook slowly until all are tender. Stir in two good tablespoonfuls of butter, salt and pepper to taste, pour into the tureen and serve.

SOUP CRECY.

Take three large carrots, wash and scrape and cut them into slices, put them in a saucepan with half an onion, a stick of celery, and a bay leaf, more than cover with boiling water and cook until tender. Remove from the fire, take out the bay leaf and rub the vegetables through a sieve with the water they were boiled in. Put back in the saucepan. Rub a generous tablespoonful of butter with half a tablespoonful of flour, and stir into the puree, add to it a cup and a half of boiling milk, stir until thick, add pepper and salt to taste. Take from the fire, and stir into it one egg yolk beaten with two tablespoonfuls of cream. Serve at once.

CURRY SOUP.

Prepare for cooking two small white onions, two French carrots and half a turnip cut in slices, and cook slowly in a pint of boiling water until they fall to pieces, cook with them until tender a celeriac root, remove from the other vegetables and put one side. Melt two ounces of butter in a saucepan, and stir in a slightly heaping tablespoonful of flour, an even dessertspoonful of curry powder, mix well together and then add a pint of milk. Strain the vegetables through a fine sieve, but do not press them, and add the stock therefrom to the milk, etc., in the saucepan, and salt to taste. Beat half a cup of cream with two egg yolks until light, remove the soup from the fire, mix a little of it with the eggs and cream, turn it back into the saucepan, stir well together and pour at once into the tureen in which you have already placed the celeriac cut in slices. If liked, two tablespoonfuls of Madeira may be added just before the soup is turned into the tureen. Serve with croutons.

MOCK FISH SOUP.

It is better to prepare the balls for this soup first, as follows: Put in a saucepan a tablespoonful of white flour and two tablespoonfuls of Groult's potato flour, stir together and add a tablespoonful of butter and a cup of milk, mix all together and place on the stove where it is not very hot. Stir constantly until it is smooth and no longer sticks to the pan, remove from the fire, let it cool, and beat in two eggs, one at a time, season with a dash of cayenne, a few grains of powdered mace, a few drops of onion juice, a little salt and half a teaspoonful of sugar. These balls must be seasoned very delicately. Cook and drain as the spinach balls are done, using a teaspoon instead of a tablespoon. Put to one side while the soup is being made. For the soup take three French carrots, half a parsnip, half a white onion and a little green pepper chopped fine, cover with boiling water and cook until tender. Melt a generous tablespoonful of butter in a saucepan, and when it bubbles stir into it a small tablespoonful of flour, then add three cups of milk and let it come to a boil. When the vegetables are tender stir them into the thickened milk with the water they were boiled in, together with half a teaspoonful of sugar and salt and pepper to taste. Then put the balls in and let the soup come to a boil, add a teaspoonful of finely minced parsley and remove from the fire. Have one egg yolk beaten with two tablespoonfuls of cream and stir in carefully so as not to break the balls just before turning the soup into the tureen.

A NORWEGIAN SWEET SOUP.

Put a quarter of a cup of rice into three cups of boiling water with a small stick of cinnamon, and let it boil nearly an hour. About fifteen minutes before it is done add half a cup of raisins stoned. Beat two egg yolks with a heaping tablespoonful of sugar until white and creamy, then stir into them about half a cup of sweet cider, remove the soup from the fire, add a little of it to the eggs and cider, stir well, and mix all together rapidly and serve at once. Two tablespoonfuls of good sherry improves it.

ONION SOUP.

Melt two tablespoonfuls of butter in a spider, when it bubbles add four large onions, washed, skinned and cut in slices, let them simmer without browning about half an hour, then stir in a slightly heaping tablespoonful of flour. When it thickens pour in gradually a pint and a half of boiling milk, season with salt and pepper to taste, press through a puree sieve, and return to the fire. While it is getting hot, beat together two egg yolks and half a cup of cream, remove from the stove and stir the eggs and cream into it rapidly, pour at once into the tureen and serve.

SOUP OF GREEN PEAS.—No. 1.

Take from a pint of green peas two heaping tablespoonfuls and set aside. Put the rest in a saucepan with half a white onion, in boiling water. Cover tightly, letting them cook until quite tender, then mash through a puree sieve with the water in which they were boiled and using a little more to take out all that is good of the peas through the sieve. Put back on the stove, rub a good heaping tablespoonful of butter with a small tablespoonful of flour and add to the puree of peas. Have a heaping tablespoonful of turnips and two of carrots cut into dice and cooked in as little water as possible, and the two tablespoonfuls of peas cooked until tender, add to the soup with half a teaspoonful of sugar and pepper and salt to taste. Let all this cook together while enough milk to make the soup the proper consistency is coming to a boil. Mix together, add a teaspoonful of finely minced parsley, pour into the tureen and serve.

SOUP OF GREEN PEAS.—No. 2.

Put one quart of green peas over the fire in three quarts of boiling water with three French carrots, a small turnip cut into dice and a small white onion chopped. Cover tightly and let the vegetables cook until tender. Rub two ounces of butter with a small tablespoonful of flour, add a little of the soup to this to thin it and then stir all together, add an even tablespoonful of finely minced parsley, an even teaspoonful of sugar, and salt and pepper to taste; let it come to a boil and then serve.

POTATO SOUP.

Take four large potatoes, peel and boil them tender in water, mash very fine with a small tablespoonful of butter, add as much boiling milk as will make it the right consistency. Boil in as little water as possible one tablespoonful of turnips and two of carrots cut into dice; when tender turn all into the soup, add a little cayenne and salt to taste. Just before serving beat a quarter of a cup of cream with one egg yolk, remove the soup from the fire and stir the two together as in other cream soups, and serve at once with fried croutons.

PUREE OF VEGETABLES.

Cut fine three onions, one turnip, two French carrots and four potatoes, put in a saucepan with four tablespoonfuls of butter and a little parsley; let them cook about ten minutes, then add a tablespoonful of flour. Stir well and add two quarts of boiling milk, season with salt and pepper and a tiny bit of sugar, and when it boils take out the parsley, press the soup through a sieve and serve with croutons of fried bread.

PUREE OF TURNIPS.

Peel and slice some young turnips, add an onion and carrot sliced, cover with boiling water and cook until tender. Mash them in the water and press through a fine sieve. To a pint of the puree have a pint of boiling milk. Return the puree to the fire, and stir into it a large heaping tablespoonful of butter and a small pinch of mace. Take the milk from the stove and stir briskly into it two egg yolks beaten with two tablespoonfuls of cream, then remove the puree from the stove and stir the eggs and milk into it, season to taste with salt and pepper and serve.

VEGETABLE SOUP.

One cup and a half of green peas, three small French carrots, and a small cauliflower cut into flowerettes, one pint of milk, half a cup of cream, a good half tablespoonful of flour, one tablespoonful of butter, and the yolks of two eggs. Wash and scrape the carrots, cut in thin slices and boil each vegetable by itself in as little water as possible. When the carrots and peas are done put them together in a saucepan with the water in which they were cooked, add the milk, put the saucepan on the fire and let it come to a boil, rub the butter and flour together, mix with a little milk and stir into the vegetables. Drain the water well from the flowerettes, and just before serving put them in the tureen. Beat the yolks of eggs and the cream together in a bowl, remove the soup from the fire, add a little of it to the eggs and cream, then turn them into the soup, stir well and pour it into the tureen.

TOMATO SOUP.

Put a generous tablespoonful of butter in a saucepan, when it is hot add half an onion chopped fine, let it stew gently for a few minutes, then add a pint of canned tomatoes, cook half an hour. Rub a heaping tablespoonful of flour and one of butter smoothly together and stir into the tomatoes. Have ready a pint of boiling milk, pour the tomatoes into a puree sieve with the boiling milk and rub through the sieve. Season with salt and pepper and a very little sugar. Return to the fire, make it hot, but be careful not to let it boil, as it will curdle. Serve at once with croutons.

BARLEY SOUP.

Put a quarter of a cup of well washed barley with a bay leaf and a small blade of mace into a pint and a half of cold water, boil slowly for three hours. Take out the bay leaf and mace and add a small onion cut fine, two French carrots cut in dice, and cook until tender, then add a pint of milk, a good heaping tablespoonful of butter, salt and pepper to taste, let it come to a boil, remove from the fire and stir into it one egg yolk beaten with two tablespoonfuls of cream.

BLACK BEAN SOUP WITH MOCK MEAT BALLS.

Soak over night a pint of black beans in a quart of water. In the morning drain, and cover with fresh water, set the saucepan on the stove; when the water comes to a boil drain it off and add a quart of fresh water. Cut fine an onion, and with a few slices of carrot and turnip and green pepper fry in a heaping tablespoonful of butter, add to the beans with a bay leaf half a dozen peppercorns, two cloves, cook until tender, press through a sieve, return to the fire, and if it is too thick add more water. Have a hard boiled egg and half a lemon cut into dice, and meat balls made from recipe given for mock meat the size of hickory nuts and boiled in water as other balls are cooked. Drop the balls into the soup, and when hot pour the soup over the lemon and egg in the tureen and serve.



Entrees.

EGG BORDER WITH RICE AND CURRY SAUCE.

Stir four eggs together, add three-quarters of a cup of rich milk, a few drops of onion juice, and salt and pepper to taste; beat a little. Have a border mould well buttered and sprinkled with finely minced parsley, pour the mixture into it, set in a pan of boiling water in the oven, cover and let it cook until firm—from five to ten minutes. Have ready some rice boiled twenty minutes in plenty of salted water and well drained, and a cream sauce into which a slightly heaping teaspoonful of curry powder has been stirred. Turn the egg border out on a hot platter, fill the center with rice, pour some of the sauce over it, and the rest around the border. Garnish with parsley and serve at once.

RICE BORDER WITH VEGETABLES OR HARD BOILED EGGS IN CREAM SAUCE.

Three-quarters of a cup of Carolina rice, picked over carefully and washed. Boil fifteen minutes in salted water. Drain off the water and have one pint and a half of boiling milk in a double boiler, stir the rice into this and cook until all the milk is absorbed, then add a tablespoonful of butter. Butter a border mould well, turn the rice into it, pressing it down so that the form will be perfect, put in the plate heater for five minutes, turn out on a platter and serve with vegetables or hard boiled eggs in a cream sauce.

A BORDER TIMBALE OF MOCK CHICKEN.

Take three-quarters of a cup of rich milk, put half of it into a saucepan with an ounce and a half of butter, let it come to a boil, and then stir into it an ounce and a half of dried and sifted bread crumbs and a good half tablespoonful of flour. Stir constantly until it no longer sticks to the pan, remove from the fire and let it cool. When cold add two heaping tablespoonfuls of finely chopped walnuts, one tablespoonful of lemon juice, one teaspoonful of onion juice, one even teaspoonful of sugar, a saltspoonful of mace, two eggs unbeaten—one at a time—and the rest of the milk, salt and pepper to taste. Beat hard. Butter well a border mould, and sprinkle with fine bread crumbs, turn the timbale mixture into it, set the mould in a pan of boiling water, cover to keep from browning, and bake from ten to fifteen minutes.

SAUCE.—Put in a spider a good heaping tablespoonful of butter, let it brown, add a thick slice of onion cut in small pieces and a heaping tablespoonful of flour, stir constantly until it is a very dark rich brown, being careful not to let it burn, then add a quarter of a pound of fresh mushrooms, skinned and stemmed and cut into dice, let them cook a few minutes, then add a stock made from their stems and skins. Have a celery root that has been pared and cut into dice and cooked until tender in very little water with a bay leaf and two cloves, remove the cloves and bay leaf and turn the rest into the sauce, season with pepper and salt. Turn the timbale out on a platter, fill the center with the sauce, garnish and serve. A few truffles are a great addition. The timbale may also be served with an olive sauce.

A MOULD OF SPAGHETTINA.

Put three-quarters of a cup of spaghettina, broken in small pieces, into a quart of boiling water with an even tablespoonful of salt. Boil half an hour. Drain the water off and add a cup of milk to the spaghettina, and cook nearly half an hour, until the milk is almost all absorbed. Then make a cream sauce as follows: One cup of milk in a saucepan, rub butter the size of an egg into a slightly heaping tablespoonful of flour, adding a little of the warm milk, then stir into the milk on the fire, season with salt and pepper, add two even tablespoonfuls of grated cheese—the American Edam cheese is nice for this—and when the sauce is thick turn the spaghettina into it, let it come to a boil, turn out on a dish, and when cool add one egg beaten light. Butter a border mould which holds a little more than a pint, sprinkle it with bread crumbs, turn the mixture into it and set the mould into a pan of hot water and bake in a moderate oven twenty-five minutes. Have a pint of nicely stewed tomatoes seasoned to taste and thickened with bread crumbs and a good tablespoonful of butter. Turn the spaghettina mould out on a platter, fill the center with the stewed tomatoes, garnish with parsley and serve. It makes a very pretty dish and is an excellent piece de resistance for dinner or luncheon.

SPINACH BORDER MOULD.

Prepare the spinach as in recipe for spinach pudding, butter a border mould, dust it with bread crumbs, and press the spinach mixture into it, put the mould into a pan of hot water in the oven, cover it to prevent browning, and bake about twenty minutes.

A FILLING FOR THE CENTER OF MOULD OF SPINACH.

Break two eggs in a bowl, add a little salt and four tablespoonfuls of cream and beat them slightly. Turn into a buttered tin cup and stand in a saucepan with a little boiling water in it on the stove, cover and cook until stiff—about three or four minutes—remove from the fire, turn out of the mould and cut in half-inch slices and then into stars or any fancy-shape preferred, or into dice. Make a cream sauce, turn the spinach mould out on a platter, put a little of the sauce in the center, then some of the egg stars, then the rest of the sauce, and finish with the egg stars.

MOCK COD FISH BALLS.

Six medium sized potatoes, washed, peeled and boiled for ten minutes in salted water. Drain and grate them while hot and stir in two heaping tablespoonfuls of butter; mix thoroughly. Season with salt, cayenne pepper to taste, and add a teaspoonful of grated onion and a saltspoonful of mace. Beat two egg yolks light and stir well into it with two heaping tablespoonfuls of cracker crumbs. Fry brown in small balls in boiling fat without crowding them in the basket, drain on kitchen paper and serve very hot on a platter, garnish with parsley.

MOCK FISH BALLS IN CURRY OR CREAM SAUCE.

Five ounces of plain boiled potatoes put through a patent vegetable strainer or mashed very fine. Add three ounces of butter and a slightly heaping tablespoonful of Groult's potato flour, two eggs slightly beaten and stirred in—a little at a time—a few drops of onion juice and salt and pepper to taste. Have a saucepan of boiling salted water over the fire, dip a tablespoon in cold water and then into the mixture and take out in oblong balls as nicely and uniformly shaped as possible, and drop them carefully into the boiling water, which must not boil too violently as the mixture is tender and would cook to pieces. Put them in without crowding and let them cook three minutes, taking them out one after another as they are done. Put in a colander to drain while preparing the curry sauce. Melt in a saucepan a heaping tablespoonful of butter and add to it a heaping teaspoonful of flour, an even teaspoonful of curry powder, stir well and add milk until of the consistency of cream sauce. Put the balls into the sauce and let it come to a boil, remove from the fire, and add a tablespoonful of good Madeira. Serve on a platter, garnish with parsley and serve. The curry powder and wine may be omitted if not liked, and the balls served in plain cream sauce.

MOCK FISH (a Norwegian dish).

Take three or four large white potatoes. Wash and peel them and boil until only half done. Grate them, and take only the part that has passed through the grater—that it may be light. Then weigh out half a pound. Beat the yolks of three eggs very light with a quarter of a cup of cream, mix with the potatoes and add three ounces of butter melted, half a teaspoonful of grated white onion, a dash of cayenne pepper, and salt to taste. Butter a mould well, sprinkle it with dried and sifted bread crumbs, put the mixture in it, and set the mould in a pan of boiling water in the oven, cover the mould and bake half an hour. Turn out carefully on a platter, pour a cream or Hollandaise sauce around it, and garnish with parsley. Serve very hot with a cucumber salad with French dressing, as a fish course.

MOCK MEAT.

Put three-quarters of a cup of milk and three ounces of butter in a saucepan on the fire. When it boils stir in three ounces of dried and rolled bread crumbs and a slightly heaping tablespoonful of flour, and half a teaspoonful of sugar. Let it cook until it no longer adheres to the pan, then remove from the fire. When it is cool, add three eggs, one at a time, beating until smooth, then add one heaping tablespoonful of chopped walnut meats, salt and pepper to taste, and a few drops of onion juice. Make into flat cakes, a little less than half an inch thick, like sausage cakes, dip them in flour, put them into a saucepan of boiling salted water and cook for three or four minutes. Take them up, drain them from the water, dip in flour again, and brown them in hot butter in a spider. Set them one side to keep hot. In another spider make a sauce. Put in a heaping tablespoonful of flour, a generous heaping tablespoonful of butter, and a heaping tablespoonful of chopped walnut meats, let them all brown nicely together, then stir in a vegetable stock that has been strained until the gravy is as thick as cream.

SPAGHETTINA CHOPS.

Spaghettina is finer than spaghetti, and for sale at Italian groceries. Half a cup of milk, half a cup of spaghettina, broken into bits, three tablespoonfuls of grated cheese, one tablespoonful of butter, half a tablespoonful of flour, and one egg. Put the spaghettina on in boiling salted water, boil for three-quarters of an hour, drain well in a colander. Make the sauce by melting the butter and stirring the flour into it until smooth, then add the cheese and milk and the spaghettina. Let it come to a boil and stir in quickly the beaten egg, let it thicken, remove at once from the fire, turn it out in a deep plate, and when cold form it into chops, dip them in beaten egg, then in bread crumbs and fry in boiling fat. They are very nice served with a tomato sauce, but good without it.

TOMATO CHOPS.

Measure three-quarters of a cup of tomatoes after the water has been drained off, put in a saucepan over the fire and stir into it a cupful of mashed potatoes, a heaping tablespoonful of butter, salt and pepper to taste, half a cup of grated bread crumbs. Mix thoroughly and add one egg beaten light. Remove from the fire, turn into a deep plate, let it get cold, then form in the shape of chops, dip in egg and roll in dried bread or cracker crumbs and fry a nice brown in boiling fat. Arrange on a platter and serve with tomato sauce, or place around a dish of stewed tomatoes.

SAVORY FRIED BREAD.

Cut slices of stale home-made bread about half an inch thick, shape them like chops, soak the slices in a rich, well seasoned vegetable stock until nearly saturated with it—don't allow them to become too soft—then dip in beaten egg mixed with a little milk and fry in butter in a spider until a nice brown. Serve with tomato sauce, or around a dish of stewed tomatoes.

MOCK FISH CHOPS.

Pare three good sized potatoes, cut fine and throw them into cold water to prevent them from turning dark. When all are cut drain them from the water and chop very fine—there must be two cupfuls. Have a cup of boiling milk in a saucepan and put the potatoes into it, cook until tender, but not soft, and be careful not to let them burn; when done add two generous heaping tablespoonfuls of butter, two heaping tablespoonfuls of French carrots, previously cooked in as little water as possible, and chopped very fine, one heaping teaspoonful of green pepper, one of parsley, one heaping teaspoonful of grated onion, a heaping saltspoonful of powdered mace, a dash of cayenne pepper and salt to taste. Measure two tablespoonfuls of tomatoes—after all the water has been pressed from them—chop fine and add to it one whole egg and one egg yolk beaten light, stir this into the potato mixture while on the stove, remove at once from the fire, add two heaping tablespoonfuls of cracker crumbs rolled fine, and two tablespoonfuls of fine Madeira or sherry. Turnout to cool and then form into chops, roll in egg and cracker crumbs and fry in boiling fat. Serve with cucumber salad.

FRICASSEE OF SPAGHETTINA.

Take a cupful of spaghettina, broken into small pieces, put in boiling salted water and cook for three-quarters of an hour. Drain well, have a cupful of cream sauce and stir the cooked spaghettina into it, let it come to a boil, season with salt and pepper, and add the well beaten yolk of an egg, stir well, remove at once, and turn into a hot vegetable dish and serve.

MUSHROOMS EN COQUILLE.

Wash half a pound of nice, fresh mushrooms, peel them and cut off the stems, cut the flaps into dice, and put the skins and stems in a saucepan with a cup of water, and cook for ten minutes. While these are cooking put a heaping tablespoonful of butter in a spider, when hot add the mushroom dice and let them cook until tender, then add a dessertspoonful of flour, and when it is cooked add the water the stems were boiled in, and salt and pepper to taste. If the sauce is too thick add a little more water. Stir in at the last a teaspoonful of finely minced parsley, a few drops of lemon juice and the well-beaten yolk of one egg, stir well, remove from the fire, fill the shells, sprinkle bread crumbs over the tops and a little melted butter, put in the oven for an instant to brown.

RAGOUT OF EGG PLANT.

Boil a small egg plant until tender. Peel it thinly and set aside to get cold. Cut in slices an inch thick and cover the bottom of a baking dish with them. Melt a generous tablespoonful of butter in a saucepan and stir into it two heaping tablespoonfuls of fresh mushrooms, a heaping teaspoonful of parsley, a heaping teaspoonful of onion, all chopped very fine, season with salt and pepper and pour over the egg plant. When it is time to put it in the oven sprinkle with Parmesan cheese and fine breadcrumbs and dot with small lumps of butter, and bake until brown in a quick oven. Serve in the dish in which it is baked with the following sauce in a sauce boat.

SAUCE.—Boil the skins and stems of the mushrooms in a cup of water; while they are cooking, brown together in a spider a slightly heaping tablespoonful of butter, a slightly heaping tablespoonful of flour, and a small slice of onion cut very fine. Strain the mushroom skins and stems and add the water they were cooked in to the browned butter and flour, and when the sauce is thick and smooth turn it into a saucepan and add to it a heaping tablespoonful of mushrooms, one small cucumber pickle and two large olives, all chopped very fine. Let all simmer together for a few minutes, season to taste with salt and pepper. If the sauce is too thick add a little water. It should be like thick cream.

PATTIES OF PUFF PASTE.

Roll out some puff paste an inch thick, cut with a patty-cutter as many rounds as are needed, then with a smaller cutter stamp each round about half an inch deep. Bake in a quick oven; when done lift the centers out carefully with a knife, remove a little of the inside. When wanted heat the patty shells and fill with spaghettina in tomato sauce, mushrooms or vegetables in a cream or savory sauce, or the filling as given for spinach border mould. A few truffles cut fine are a nice addition to tomato sauce. Lay the little tops on and serve.

SAVORY RICE (a Mexican Dish).

Wash half a cup of rice, drain from the water. Put a heaping tablespoonful of butter in a spider, when hot add a small leek or white onion and the rice, fry until the rice is a golden brown—do not let it get too dark. Have ready a vegetable stock, nearly fill the spider and cook twenty minutes until the rice is perfectly dry. Every grain should stand alone. Turn out on a platter and serve with tomato sauce.

RAGOUT OF ASPARAGUS WITH MOCK MEAT BALLS.

Scrape and wash a bunch of asparagus, cut in pieces about an inch long as far as the stalks are very tender, put the remainder of the stalks with an onion into a saucepan, cover with boiling water and let it cook until tender—about half an hour. Then mash them in the water in which they were boiled through a colander. Put over the fire again, and when it comes to a boil throw in the points and cook until tender. While that is cooking make some mock meat, as given in a previous recipe, form into balls as large as a walnut. Cook them in salted boiling water for five minutes, drain them from the water, also the asparagus points from the stock, put them together in a saucepan to keep hot while making a gravy. Melt a generous heaping tablespoonful of butter in a spider, add to it when it bubbles a large heaping tablespoonful of flour, stir well until it becomes a dark, rich brown, taking care that it does not burn, add the asparagus stock, season with salt and pepper—this gravy should be like thick cream—turn it over the asparagus and meat balls, stir in a good half tablespoonful of butter, let it come to a boil and serve on a platter. Garnish with parsley.

CURRIED RICE CROQUETTES.

Put three-quarters of a cup of milk in a saucepan with butter the size of an egg, let it come to a boil, and stir into it one large cup and a half of rice that has been boiled in salted water twenty minutes. Add a slightly heaping teaspoonful of curry powder, a few drops of onion juice and salt to taste. When it comes to a boil add a beaten egg to it, stir a minute and remove from the fire. Turn it out, let it cool, and then form into cylinders and fry as usual.

MOCK FISH CROQUETTES.

Slice three medium sized potatoes, boil until tender, but not soft, chop very fine an even teaspoonful of onion with three zepherettes or small square crackers, then add the hot potatoes and chop all together, season with a dash of cayenne pepper, a saltspoonful of mace, a little salt and pepper. Make a sauce with a large heaping tablespoonful of butter, a heaping teaspoonful of flour rubbed well together in a saucepan over the fire; when smooth add three-quarters of a cup of rich hot milk, when it boils add the potato mixture, let it get thoroughly hot and stir into it a well-beaten egg, remove from the fire, turn it out to get cool. Form into cylinders, dip in egg, roll in bread crumbs, fry in boiling fat, and serve with either Hollandaise or tartar sauce.

WALNUT CROQUETTES.

Put half a pint of bread crumbs and a gill of milk in a double boiler, place over the fire and stir until thick and smooth, add a pinch of salt, three-quarters of a cup of chopped nuts and a tablespoonful of sherry. When the mixture is hot stir into it the well-beaten yolks of two eggs and remove from the fire at once. Set the mixture away to get cold, then form in any shape preferred for croquettes; dip them in egg and then in dried bread or cracker crumbs, fry in boiling fat and serve with a sauce piquante.

RAGOUT OF MUSHROOMS.

Wash half a pound of fine, fresh mushrooms, skin, stem and cut them into dice. Put the stems and skins in water to cover and stew them for twenty minutes; strain and put the mushrooms into this broth with a generous tablespoonful of butter, a teaspoonful of finely chopped onion, season with salt and pepper, cook until tender; when done add two well-beaten yolks of eggs, stir briskly and remove at once from the fire, turn out on a platter, sprinkle with a little very finely minced parsley and serve very hot.

MOCK CHICKEN CROQUETTES.

Two cups of rye bread—home-made is the best—chopped fine, one cup of chopped English walnuts. Mix together and chop again with a tablespoonful of butter, an even tablespoonful of grated onion, a scant teaspoonful of ground mace. Melt a heaping tablespoonful of butter in a saucepan with half a tablespoonful of flour and add gradually to it a cupful of rich milk; when this comes to a boil add the other ingredients, salt and pepper to taste, then stir in two well-beaten eggs, remove from the fire and add a tablespoonful of lemon juice; turn out on a platter to cool, form into cylinders, dip in egg and bread crumbs, as usual, and fry in boiling fat.



Vegetables.

Vegetables should be cooked in as little water as possible; the better way is to steam them. So much of the valuable salts are washed out by boiling in too much water.

All vegetables left over can be warmed again, either in a cream sauce, or put in a double boiler and steamed, adding a little more butter.

When pepper is used, it should always be white pepper, especially in white sauces and soups.

Never salt vegetables until they are nearly cooked; it hardens them.

The water vegetables are boiled in may be utilized in making sauces and soups; the best of the vegetables goes into it.

The water Jerusalem artichokes are boiled in becomes quite a thick jelly when cold, and makes an excellent foundation for sauces.

TO BOIL POTATOES.

Select potatoes of uniform size, wash and pare thinly, cover with boiling water and cook half an hour; when nearly done add salt. As soon as done drain from the water and set the saucepan where the potatoes can steam for a few minutes. They should be served immediately, and never allowed to remain in the water a moment after they are cooked. Potatoes are much better steamed with their skins on than boiled, as they then retain all the potashes. When they are old they should be washed, pared and covered with cold water, and allowed to stand for several hours before either boiling or frying.

POTATOES BAKED.

Select them of uniform size, wash and scrub well, cut a thin slice from each end to prevent their being soggy. They require nearly an hour to bake in a moderate oven.

TO MASH POTATOES.

Boil the potatoes carefully, drain from the water, mash fine, and to four good-sized potatoes add a heaping tablespoonful of butter, a tablespoonful or two of cream or rich milk and salt and pepper to taste. Serve at once. They must be freshly mashed and very hot to be eatable. The mashed potatoes maybe squeezed through a vegetable ricer, when they are called Potatoes a la Neige.

NEW POTATOES WITH CREAM SAUCE.

Select rather small potatoes of uniform size and boil. When done drain off the water, set them back on the stove to keep hot while making a cream sauce, then put them carefully in a vegetable dish, pour the sauce over them and sprinkle with a little finely minced parsley.

BROILED POTATOES.

Take some cold boiled potatoes and cut them in rather thick slices lengthwise, dust with white pepper and salt, dip each slice in melted butter, broil over a clear fire until a nice brown. Serve with melted butter and finely minced parsley poured over them.

POTATOES A LA CREME AU GRATIN.

Chop cold boiled potatoes, put them in a baking dish, pour over them a cupful of white sauce nicely seasoned, sprinkle with a tablespoonful of grated Parmesan cheese or Edam cheese grated, one tablespoonful of bread crumbs, and dot all over with tiny bits of butter. Put in a quick oven for a few minutes to brown. Do not leave it in too long, or it will become dry.

STUFFED POTATOES.

Bake some medium-sized potatoes; when done cut in half lengthwise, scoop out the inside, taking care not to break the skin. Mash the potato smooth and fine with butter and a little milk, season with salt and pepper to taste, heat thoroughly, fill the skins, brush the tops over with melted butter, brown in the oven and serve.

POTATO FRICASSEE.

Put in a spider a generous tablespoonful of butter and a cup of milk, when hot add some cold potatoes cut in dice, season with pepper, salt, a few drops of onion juice. Let them get thoroughly hot, then add the beaten yolks of two eggs, stir constantly until thick. Great care must be taken not to let it cook too long, or the sauce will curdle. Pour into a vegetable dish, sprinkle a little finely minced parsley over the top and serve.

POTATOES A LA DUCHESSE.

Take cold mashed potatoes that are nicely seasoned with salt and pepper, form into little round cakes, put them on a tin, glaze over with beaten egg and brown in the oven. Arrange on a platter, garnish with parsley and serve.

SARATOGA CHIPS.

Peel some medium-sized white potatoes, and slice them very thin. It is better to have a potato slicer for these, if possible, as it cuts them so quickly and perfectly. Wash the potatoes in one or two waters, then cover with fresh water and lay a lump of ice on the top of them. Let them stand an hour, if convenient, drain in a colander, wipe dry with a towel, and fry in boiling fat—not too many at a time in the basket or they will stick together, and will not brown. Have a quick fire, and fry until brown and crisp, drain on paper, sprinkle with salt and serve.

FRENCH FRIED POTATOES.

Peel some potatoes and cut in finger lengths, not too thick, cover with ice water, and if they are old it is better to let them stand two hours. Drain, wipe dry, and fry in boiling fat as Saratoga chips—not too many at a time. When they are a nice brown lift the basket from the fat, sprinkle with salt, shake the grease from them and remove with a skimming spoon, drain on paper and serve at once.

POTATOES A LA MAITRE D'HOTEL.

Cut cold boiled potatoes in round slices, not too thick, put in a saucepan with some melted butter, pepper and salt. When they are hot add some lemon juice and a little minced parsley and serve.

POTATOES LYONNAISE.

Fry a little onion cut in thin slices in plenty of butter; when a delicate brown add some cold boiled potatoes cut in slices of medium thickness, mixing them with the onion by tossing them together rather than stirring, as this breaks them. Cook until a nice color, drain them, put in a dish and sprinkle a little minced parsley over them.

POTATOES A LA PARISIENNE.

Peel and wash some potatoes, scoop out into little balls with a potato scoop, which is made for the purpose. Boil for five minutes, put in melted butter in a saucepan until each potato is well covered with the butter, turn them into a pan, and brown in the oven. Turn out on a dish and sprinkle with minced parsley and a little salt.

POTATOES CREAMED AND BROWNED.

Take a pint of cold boiled potatoes, cut into dice of uniform size. Have ready a pint of cream sauce, toss the potatoes in this, season with salt and white pepper to taste, put in a baking dish, sprinkle with dried bread crumbs and a tablespoonful of American Edam cheese. A few drops of onion juice, if liked, may be added before putting the potatoes into the dish. Set it in the oven a few minutes, until it becomes a golden brown and serve. Do not let it stand in the oven long or it will dry.

POTATO PUFF.

Two cupfuls of smoothly mashed boiled or baked potatoes, two tablespoonfuls of melted butter, two well-beaten whites of eggs, a cupful of sweet cream or rich milk. Stir the melted butter into the potato, then add the eggs and cream, season with salt and pepper, turn into a buttered baking dish, bake in a quick oven and serve in the dish in which it is baked.

WHITE POTATO CROQUETTES.

Boil and mash very fine four medium sized potatoes. Put half a cup of rich milk and a generous heaping tablespoonful of butter in a saucepan over the fire. When the milk comes to a boil, stir in the mashed potatoes, season with pepper and salt to taste, mix thoroughly and add the white of an egg beaten to a stiff froth, remove from the fire, turn out on a plate to cool, then make up in small cylinders, dip in beaten egg, roll in cracker crumbs and fry a delicate brown in boiling fat.

POTATO PAPA (a Mexican Dish).

Wash, pare and boil one dozen small white potatoes, mash while hot and add to them half a cup of raisins stoned and chopped very fine, twenty large Queen olives stoned and chopped fine, one tablespoonful of parsley finely minced, an even teaspoonful of sugar, and salt and pepper to taste. Mix all well together, form into an oblong shape, leaving the top rough. Brown a little butter in a spider, put the papa into it, and after a few moments' frying scatter little lumps of butter over the top and set in the oven to brown. Garnish with parsley and hard-boiled eggs cut in quarters lengthwise.

SWEET POTATOES FRIED RAW.

Peel two or three medium-sized potatoes and cut in slices about a quarter of an inch thick, fry in boiling fat—when they are a nice brown they are done—drain on paper for a moment before serving.

COOKED SWEET POTATOES FRIED.

Take several sweet potatoes cut in slices lengthwise, not too thin. Dip each slice in melted butter and then in brown sugar, and fry in a little butter.

SWEET POTATOES MASHED AND BROWNED.

Boil three sweet potatoes of medium size until done. Peel and squeeze through the patent vegetable strainer, add a heaping tablespoonful of butter, salt and pepper to taste, and enough milk to make very soft. Put in a baking dish, dot it over with tiny bits of butter and bake until brown. Serve in the dish in which it is baked. If any is left over remove the thin brown skin, make the potato into small, flat cakes and brown on both sides in a little butter in a spider.

SWEET POTATO CROQUETTES.

Three medium-sized potatoes baked and mashed very fine and beaten to a cream with one generous tablespoonful of butter, three tablespoonfuls of cream, one teaspoonful of sugar, a little salt, one teaspoonful of lemon juice, a saltspoonful of cinnamon and one egg yolk beaten very light, and add at the last the white of egg whipped to a stiff froth. Form into cones or cylinders, dip in beaten egg and bread crumbs and fry in boiling fat. Drain on kitchen paper, sift a little sugar over them and serve at once.

BRUSSELS SPROUTS.

Pick off any leaves that may be discolored and wash well a quart of Brussels sprouts, put into a saucepan with two quarts of boiling water and a saltspoonful of soda. Boil rapidly until tender—about half an hour—just before they are done add a tablespoonful of salt. Drain them in a colander, and if it is not time to serve them stand the colander over steam to keep them hot. Do not let them remain in the water. When ready to serve put the sprouts in a vegetable dish and pour over them a pint of rich cream sauce.

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