HotFreeBooks.com
Tintinnalogia, or, the Art of Ringing - Wherein is laid down plain and easie Rules for Ringing all - sorts of Plain Changes
by Richard Duckworth and Fabian Stedman
1  2     Next Part
Home - Random Browse

TINTINNALOGIA:

OR,

THE ART OF RINGING.

Wherein Is laid down plain and easie Rules for Ringing all sorts of Plain Changes.

Together with Directions for Pricking and Ringing all Cross Peals; with a full Discovery of the Mystery and Grounds of each Peal.

As Also Instructions for Hanging of Bells, with all things belonging thereunto.

by a Lover of that ART.

A. Persii Sat. V. Disce: sed ira cadat naso, rugosaque sanna,

LONDON, Printed for F.S. and are to be Sold by Tho. Archer, at his Shop under the Dyal of St. Dunstan's Church in Fleet-street, 1671.



TO THE NOBLE SOCIETY OF COLLEDGE-YOUTHS.

GENTLEMEN,

I have seen a Treatise intituled, de Tintinnabulis—that is, of little Bells, the Language Latin, but pen'd by a Dutchman, being a Discourse of striking tunes on little Bells with traps under the feet, with several Books on several Instruments of Music, and Tunes prick't for the same; Then considering that the Well-wishers to either of them, took great pains to make plain the use of them, I thought it worth a Dayes labour, to write something on this Art or Science, that the Rules thereof might not be lost and obscured to some, as the Chronicles before William the Conqueror, being given only by Tradition from Father to Son. Wherefore I humbly intreat you favourably to accept this small Treatise, as a foundation whereon may be raised a famous Structure; and if any one objects a fault, excuse it with the Ringing term—He was Over-bell'd—So you will much oblige him that is a Well-wisher to your Recreation,

CAMPANISTA.



On the Ingenious Art of RINGING.

What Musick is there that compar'd may be To well-tun'd Bells enchanting melody! Breaking with their sweet sound the willing Air, And in the listning ear the Soul ensnare; The ravisht Air such pleasure loth to lose, With thousand Echoes still prolongs each close; And gliding streams which in the Vallies trills, Assists its speed unto the neighbouring Hills; Where in the rocks & caves, with hollow gounds, The warbling lightsome Element rebounds. This for the Musick: In the Action's Health, And every Bell is a Wit's Common-wealth For here by them we plainly may discern, How that Civility we are to learn. The Treble to the Tenor doth give place, And goes before him for the better grace: But when they chance to change, 'tis as a dance, They foot A Galliard, a la mode de France. An Eighteenscore's a figure dance, but Grandsire Hath the Jig-steps! & Tendrings Peal doth answer The manner of Corants: A plain Six-score, Is like a Saraband, the motion slower. When Bells Ring round, and in their Order be, They do denote how Neighbours should agree; But if they Clam, the harsh sound spoils the sport, And 'tis like Women keeping Dover Court For when all talk, there's none can lend an ear The others story, and her own to hear; But pull and hall, straining for to sputter What they can hardly afford time to utter. Like as a valiant Captain in the Field, By his Conduct, doth make the Foe to yield; Ev'n so, the leading Bell keeping true time, The rest do follow, none commits a Crime: But if one Souldier runs, perhaps a Troop Seeing him gone, their hearts begin to droop; Ev'n so the fault of one Bell spoils a Ring, (And now my Pegasus has taken Wing.)



Upon the Presentation of GRANDSIRE BOB To the COLLEDGE-YOUTHS, By the AUTHOR of that PEAL.

Gentlemen of the Noble Crew Of Colledge-Youths, there lately blew A wind, which to my Noddle flew (upon a day when as it Snew;) Which to my Brains the Vapors drew And there began to work and brew, 'Till in my Pericranium grew Conundrums, how some Peal that's New Might be compos'd? and to pursue These thoughts (which did so whet and hew My flat Invention) and to shew What might be done, I strait withdrew Myself to ponder—whence did accrue This Grandsire Bob, which unto you I Dedicate, as being due Most properly; for there's but few Besides, so ready at their Q—— (Especially at the first View) To apprehend a thing that's New; Though they'l pretend, and make a shew, As if the intricat'st they knew; What Bob doth mean, and Grandsire True, And read the course without a Clue Of this new Peal: Yet though they screw Their shallow Brains, they'l ne're unglue The Method on't (and I'm a Jew) If I don't think this to be true, They see no more on't than blind Hugh. Well, let their tongues run Titere tu, Drink muddy Ale, or else French Lieve, Whil'st we our Sport and Art renew, And drink good Sack till Sky looks blew, So Grandsire bids you All adieu.

R.R.



THE ART OF RINGING.



Of the Beginning of Changes.

It is an ancient Proverb with us in England (That Rome was not built in a day) by which expression is declared, That difficult things are not immediately done, or in a short time accomplished: But for the Art of Ringing, it is admirable to conceive in how short a time it hath increased, that the very depth of its intricacy is found out; for within these Fifty or Sixty years last past, Changes were not known, or thought possible to be Rang: Then were invented the Sixes, being the very ground of a Six score: Then the Twenty, and Twenty-four, with several other Changes. But Cambridge Forty-eight, for many years, was the greatest Peal that was Rang or invented; but now, neither Forty-eight, nor a Hundred, nor Seven-hundred and twenty, nor any Number can confine us; for we can Ring Changes, Ad infinitum. Although Philosophers say, No Number is infinite, because it can be numbred; for infinite is a quantity that cannot be taken or assigned, but there is (infinitum quoad hos) as they term it, that is infinite in respect of our apprehension: Therefore a Ringers knowledge may seem infinite to dive so infinitely into such an infinite Subject; but least my Discourse should be infinite, I will conclude it, and proceed to the Peals following.

Before I Treat of the method and diversity of Peals, I think it not impertinent to speak something of the Properties wherewith a Young Ringer ought to be qualified, and then proceed to the Peals. First then, before he is entred into a Company, it is presupposed, that he is able to Set a Bell Fore-stroke and Back-stroke, as the terms are: Next, that he know how to Ring Round, or Under-sally: Then, that he may be complete, it is convenient, that he understand the Tuning of Bells; for what is a Musician, unless he can Tune his Instrument, although he plays never so well? To do which, let him learn on some Instrument, or Wyer-Bells, to know a Third, Fifth, and Eighth, which are the principal Concords: Or otherwise, let him get a Pipe called a Pitch-pipe, which may be made by any Organ-maker, to contain eight Notes, or more, (according to his pleasure) with their Flatts and Sharps, which will be very useful in the Tuning of Bells. And then this is a general Rule, begin at the Tenor, or biggest Bell, and count 3 whole Notes, then a half Note, or Sharp, 3 whole Notes, then a half Note, or Sharp; and so on, until you come to the least Bell or Treble. For example on four Bells, 1:234, here the 432 are whole Notes, and the half Note or Sharp is between 1 and 2. On Five Bells, 12:345 the 543 are whole Notes; and the half Note or Sharp is between 2 and 3. On Six, 123:456 the half Note or Sharp is between 3 and 4. On Eight Bells, 1:2345:678, one half Note or Sharp is between 5 and 6, and the other between 1 and 2. On Ten, 123:4567:8910; here one half Note is between 7 and 8, and the next between 3 and 4. On Twelve Bells, 12:345:6789:10 11 12. Here one half Note or Sharp is between 9 and 10, the next between 5 and 6, and the other between 2 and 3, which last is made contrary to the former Rule, it being but two whole Notes from the next half Note to it; the reason is this, the Ninth is one whole Note below the Eighth, therefore the 2 must be a whole Note below the Treble, otherwise they would not be a true Eighth, therefore the half Note is put between 2 and 3. Now he that hath these Rules, and a good ear to judge of the Concords, may at any time cast his Verdict (as to Bells, whether they are well in Tune or not) amongst the chief of the Company.



Of the Changes.

A Change is made between two Bells that strikes next to each other, by removing into each others places, as in these two Figures 1, 2. make a Change between them, and they will stand 2, 1. which is called a Change; make another Change between them, and they will stand in their right places, as at first, 1, 2. These two Changes are all that can be made on two Bells.



The Changes on three Bells.

On three Bells there are six several Changes to be made; in Ringing of which, there is one Bell to be observed, which is called the Hunt, and the other two are Extream Bells (but they cannot properly be so called, because every Bell hunts in the six Changes; yet because 'tis commonly Rang by observing a Hunt and two Extream Bells, I will therefore proceed in that course.) The name of Hunt is properly given to it, because of its continual motion up and down amongst the other Bells, which motion is called Hunting, and the other two are called Extream Bells, because when the Hunt is either before or behind them, that is at the Extream, or utmost place, there is a Change then to be made between them, called an Extream Change. There are two several wayes to Ring the six Changes. One whereof is to make the Treble the Hunt, and the other way is to make the Tenor the Hunt. I will give an Example in hunting the Treble, the Bells are supposed to stand thus.—

123

Now the Treble must be hunted up over the Second and Third, which is to be done, by making a Change between the Treble, and each of those two Bells in order; therefore first I remove the Treble up over the Second, into the seconds place, by making a Change between the Treble and Second, thus.—

213

The Treble being removed up over the Second, it must next be removed up over the Third, as in this Change.—

231

Alwayes observe, that when the Hunt moves from the foremost Bell toward the hindmost, then it hunts up, as in the Changes next before; but when it moves or hunts from the hindmost Bell, toward the Bell that leads, then it hunts down, as appears by the Changes following. The Treble being hunted up behind the Extream Bells, an Extream Change is next to be made between them.—

321

Here you may observe, that if the Hunt had been hunted down without an Extream Change first made, those Changes in hunting it down, would have been the same with those that were made in hunting it up.

The Extream Change being made, the Treble must be hunted down again before the Bells thus.—

312 132

The Treble being now hunted down, the next is to be an Extream Change.—

123

which is the last Change of the six.

The other way to Ring the six Changes, is, to make the Tenor the Hunt, which being behind already, it must first be hunted down, as in these Changes.—

123 132 312

The Third, which is the Hunt, being hunted down before the Bells, the Extream Change must next be made between the 2, and 1. Which are the Extream Bells, thus.—

321

The Extream Change being made, the Third must be hunted up again.—

231 213

The Third being hunted up, another Extream must be made, which brings the Bells round in their right places.—

123



The Plain Changes on four Bells.

On four Bells, there are Twenty four several Changes, in Ringing of which, there is one Bell called the Hunt, and the other three are Extream Bells; the Hunt moves, and hunts up and down continually, and lies but once in one place, except only when it comes before or behind the Bells, at which time it lies there twice together; it has the same course here, as in the six Changes before set down; two of the Extream Bells makes a Change every time the Hunt comes before or behind them. An Example I will here give, making the Treble the Hunt, and the Extream Changes I make between the two farthest Extream Bells from the Hunt. I set down the four Figures, representing the four Bells, thus.—

1234

The Treble must now be hunted up behind the Bells, where it is to lie twice together, and then to hunt down before them, where it must lie twice, and then hunt up again as before. The Hunt is alwayes one of the two Bells which makes every Change, except only when it comes before or behind the Bells, and it moves only over one Bell at a time; 'tis to be hunted up after this manner.—

2134 2314 2341

The Treble being hunted up behind the Bells, as appears by the last Changes, the next is to be an Extream Change between the two farthest Extream Bells from the Hunt, which are the Second and Third, thus.—

3241

The Extream being made, the Treble must be hunted down again, as in these Changes.—

3214 3124 1324

The Treble being hunted down, there is another Extream Change to be made between the two farthest Bells from it, which are the Second and Fourth.—

1342

The Extream being made, the Treble must be hunted as before, and so to the end of the Peal, making an Extream Change every time the Hunt comes before and behind the Bells.—

3142 3412 3421 4321 4312 4132 1432 1423 4123 4213 4231 2431 2413 2143 1243 1234

The Twenty-four Changes are to be Rang another way, in hunting up the Treble, which is, by making every Extream Change between the two nearest Bells to the Hunt, as in these Changes, first I hunt the Treble up.—

1234 2134 2314 2341

The Treble being hunted up, the Extream Change is to be made between the 3 and 4, which are the two nearest Bells to it, as in this Change,

2431

and so to the end of the Peal, making every Extream between the two nearest Bells to the Hunt all the way.

These two wayes in Ringing the Twenty-four, differs only in making the Extream Changes, one whereof is to make them between the two farthest Extream Bells from the Hunt, and the other to make them between the two nearest Bells to it.

The Twenty-four Changes are to be Rang two wayes more in hunting down the Treble; one way, is to make the Extreams between the two farthest Bells from the Hunt; and the other, is to make them between the two nearest, as before. A short Example I will set down, the Bells stand thus.—

1234

The Treble should now be hunted down, but it being already before the Bells, insomuch that it can be removed no lower; therefore the first must be an Extream Change, either between the two nearest, or two farthest Bells from the Hunt at pleasure; the Extream being made, the Treble is to hunt up, and so to the end of the Peal, in the same course as before.

1243 2143 2413 2431 4231 4213 4123 1423 1432 4132 4312 4321 3421 3412 3142

In hunting the Second, Third, or Fourth, there is to be observed the same course, as in hunting the Treble: A short Example I will set down, in hunting the Third up, and making the Extream Changes between the two farthest Bells from it.—

1234 1243 2143 2134 2314 3214

First, I hunt up the third over the fourth; the Hunt being up, I make an extream between the treble and second, and then hunt down the third again, as in these changes, which course is to be observed to the end of the Peal.

I have insisted the longer upon the directions to the Twenty-four changes, because it is the ground and method in Ringing all plain changes; and by understanding this aright, the Learner will more easily apprehend the course of all plain and single changes whatsoever.

The Twenty-four plain changes are to be Rang sixteen several wayes; in hunting one Bell, it is to be Rang four ways; that is, two wayes in hunting it up, and the other two wayes in hunting it down, (as appears in my directions before in hunting the treble:) so that in hunting the 4 Bells, 'tis to be Rang 4 times 4 wayes, which makes 16, some of which I have here set down.

Treble Hunt up, Extream between the 2 farthest Bells from it.

1234 2134 2314 2341 3241 3214 3124 1324 1342 3142 3412 3421 4321 4312 4132 1432 1423 4123 4213 4231 2431 2413 2143 1243 1234

Second up, extream between the 2 nearest to it.

1234 1324 1342 1432 1423 1243 2143 2413 4213 4123 4132 4312 4321 4231 2431 2341 3241 3421 3412 3142 3124 3214 2314 2134 1234

Fourth down, Extream between the two farthest Bells from it.

1234 1243 1423 4123 4132 1432 1342 1324 3124 3142 3412 4312 4321 3421 3241 3214 2314 2341 2431 4231 4213 2413 2143 2134 1234

Some persons do observe to Ring the Twenty-four changes with a whole Hunt, and half Hunt; but that is an imperfect course; for there cannot be one half hunt only, but there will unavoidably be three half Hunts in one and the same Twenty-four; therefore I have set down the other way to ring it, by observing a hunt, and three extream Bells, which course is much more easie and true.

In the Twenty-four Changes are contained the six Changes; the three Extream Bells in the Twenty-four makes the six Changes in course, every extream change being one of the six, and the Hunt hunting through each of the six Changes, makes Twenty-four: For Example, take the three Extream Bells in the first Twenty-four set down before, which are 234, and set down the six Changes on them, thus.—

234 324 342 432 423 243 234

Now take the first Change, which is 234, set the Treble before it, and hunt it through, thus.—

1234 2134 2314 2341

The Treble being hunted up behinde, take the next Change of the six, which is 324, set it directly under the First, and hunt the Treble down through it, thus.—

3241 3214 3124 1324

And so take each of the other six Changes, and hunt the Treble through them, it will make Twenty-four.

I will here insert two or three old Peals on five Bells, which (though rejected in these dayes, yet) in former times were much in use, which for Antiquity sake, I here set down. And first,



The Twenty all over.

The course is this—every Bell hunts in order once through the Bells, until it comes behind them; and first the Treble hunts up, next the Second, and then the 3, 4 and 5, which brings the Bells round in their right places again, at the end of the Twenty Changes, as in this following Peal.—

12345 21345 23145 23415 23451 32451 34251 34521 34512 43512 45312 45132 45123 54123 51423 51243 51234 15234 12534 12354 12345

This Peal is to be Rang, by hunting the Bells down, beginning with the Tenor, next the fourth, and so the third, second, and treble, which will bring the Bells round in course as before.



An Eight and Forty.

In this Peal, the Fifth and Fourth are both whole Hunts, each of which does hunt down before the Bells by turns, and lies there twice together and then hunts up again: The 1, 2 and 3 goes the six changes, one of which is made every time, either of the whole Hunts lies before the Bells, as in the following Changes, where the fifth hunts down the first; and lying before the Bells, there is a change made between the 1 & 2, which is one of the six changes; and then the fifth hunts up again into its place, and the fourth hunts down, which lying before the Bells, there is another of the six changes made between the 1 and 3, and then the fourth hunts up again, and the fifth hunts down next; in which course it continues to the end of the Peal, each of the whole Hunts lying but twice at one time before the Bells, as in these following changes.

12345 12354 12534 15234 51234 52134 25134 21534 21354 21345 21435 24135 42135 42315 24315 23415 23145 23154 23514 25314 52314 53214 35214 32514 32154 32145 32415 34215 43215 43125 34125 31425 31245 31254 31524 35124 53124 51324 15324 13524 13254 13245 13425 14325 41325 41235 14235 12435 12345



Cambridge Eight and Forty.

Wherein it is observed, that the Treble and Second does never come behind, neither does the Fifth and Fourth come before, as in the following Changes.

12345 21345 21354 21534 25134 25314 23514 23154 32154 32514 35214 35124 31524 31254 31245 31425 34125 34215 32415 32145 23145 23415 24315 24135 21435 21453 24153 24513 25413 25143 21543 12543 15243 15423 14523 14253 12453 12435 14235 14325 13425 13245 13254 13524 15324 15234 12534 12354 12345



The Plain Changes on five Bells.

There are Six-score Changes to be Rang on five Bells, which are to be Rang, by observing a whole Hunt, a half Hunt, and three Extream Bells; the course of the whole Hunt, is the same with the Hunt in the Twenty-four Changes, and hunts up and down in the same manner. The half Hunt moves once, that is, over one Bell every time, the whole Hunt comes before and behind the Bells; but when the half Hunt is removed either before or behind the Extream Bells, then there is an Extream Change to be made. For Example, I make the Treble the whole Hunt, and hunt it up; and the Second the half Hunt and half hunt it up, making every Extream Change between the two farthest Extream Bells from the half Hunt; the Extream Bells are the Third, Fourth, Fifth: Now observe, that whereas in the Twenty-four Changes, an Extream Change was alwayes made, when the whole Hunt came before or behind the Bells, in these Six-score Changes an Extream is alwayes to be made, when the Half Hunt comes before or behind the Extream Bells; first the Treble is to be hunted up, as in these Changes.—

12345 21345 23145 23415 23451

The whole Hunt being hunted up, the Second, which is the half Hunt, must be hunted up over one Bell, as in this Change.—

32451

The half Hunt being removed up over one Bell, the whole Hunt must be hunted down again, as in these Changes.—

32415 32145 31245 13245

The whole Hunt being hunted down, the half Hunt is to be removed up over the Fourth, which is the next Bell to it.—

13425

The whole Hunt is to hunt up as before.—

31425 34125 34215 34251

Now the half Hunt is to be hunted up over the Fifth, which is the next Bell to it, thus.—

34521

Here the Second, which is the half Hunt, is removed quite up behind the Extream Bells; yet the Extream Change is not to be made, until the whole Hunt has removed down through the Bells, as in these Changes.—

34512 34152 31452 13452

And it is a constant Rule, that whensoever the half Hunt has removed up behind the Extream Bells, or down before them, the whole Hunt must hunt through the Bells, before the Extream Change is made, as in the last Change but four, which is 3, 4, 5, 2, 1. the Second being the half Hunt, is removed up behind the 3, 4, and 5. which are the Extream Bells; and then the whole Hunt being behind, hunts immediately down; and now the Extreame Change is to be made between the 3, and 4. which are the two farthest Extream Bells from the half Hunt, as in this Change.—

14352

The Extream being made, the whole Hunt and half Hunt are to remove again; and first the whole Hunt must be hunted up.—

41352 43152 43512 43521

Now the half Hunt is to be hunted down under one Bell, thus.—

43251

The half Hunt being removed, the whole Hunt is to be hunted down.—

43215 43125 41325 14325

The half Hunt is to be removed down under another Bell, as in this Change.—

14235

Now I hunt up the Treble.—

41235 42135 42315 42351

The Treble being hunted up, I hunt down the Second before the Extream Bells.—

24351

Now I hunt down the Treble again, and then make the Extream Change, as in these Changes.—

24315 24135 21435 12435 12453

The last is the Extream Change, which is made between the Third and Fifth; and this course is to be observed to the end of the Six-score Changes, which is set down at large at the end of the directions to this Peal.

Another short Example I will insert, which is Second down, and Fourth up, (for that is the common Phrase amongst Ringers) whereby 'tis alwayes to be observed, that the first Bell which is named, is the whole Hunt, and the second that is named, is the half Hunt, as herein you may perceive; where Second down, is meant, that the Second Bell is the whole Hunt, and to hunt down the first Change; and the Fourth Bell is the half Hunt, and to half hunt up, that is, to move up towards the hindmost Bell the first time it moves at the beginning of the Peal; which are only directions in making the first Changes, for one whole Hunt and half Hunt may be hunted several wayes, either up or down at pleasure. First, I hunt down the Second.—

12345 21345

The Second being hunted down, the Fourth, which is the half Hunt, must be removed up over one Bell, thus.—

21354

The half Hunt being removed, I must hunt up the Second, as in these Changes.—

12354 13254 13524 13542 31542 31524 31254 32154 23154 23145

Now the Fourth, which is the half Hunt, being behind the Extream Bells, the next is to be an Extream Change, which may be made either between the two farthest Bells from the half Hunt, or the two nearest to it; and after the Extream Change is made, the whole Hunt and half Hunt must be hunted as before. These Six-score Changes of Second and Fourth, I have set down at large, at the end of my directions to these Changes on five Bells.

In every Six-score, the Extream Changes may be made either between the two farthest Extream Bells from the half Hunt, or between the two nearest to it, observing to make all the Extreams in one Six-score alike; that is, if you make the first Extream Change between the two farthest Extream Bells from the half Hunt, you must make all the following Extreams in the same Six score between the two farthest Extream Bells also; or if you make the first Extream in any Six-score between the two nearest to the half Hunt, you must make all the following Extreams in the same Six-score between the two nearest also.

The Six-score plain and single Changes, are to be Rang Eight-score several wayes; for although there are but Six-score several Changes on five Bells, yet by altering the whole Hunt, the half Hunt, and Extreams, the course of the Changes are so altered, that the same Changes doe not come all along together in any two of those Eight-score wayes.

With one whole Hunt and half Hunt, the Six-score Changes are to be Rang, or set down eight several wayes; one way, is by hunting the whole Hunt, and half Hunt both up; the second way, is by hunting the whole Hunt and half Hunt both down; the third way, is in hunting the whole Hunt up, and the half Hunt down; the fourth way, is by hunting the whole Hunt down, and the half Hunt up; each of these four wayes is to be Rang two wayes more; one is, in making the Extreams between the two farthest Extream Bells from the half Hunt, and the other way is in making them between the two nearest; for Example, in making the treble the whole Hunt, and second the half Hunt, the Six-score are to be Rang eight several wayes (viz.)

Extream Changes to be made between the 2 farthest Extream Bells from the half Hunt.

Treble and second both up Treble and second both down Treble down, and second up Treble up, and second down

Extream Changes to be made between the two nearest Extream Bells to the half Hunt, which is called Mediums.

Treble and second both up Treble and second both down Treble down, and second up Treble up, and second down

On five Bells there are 20 Hunts, (i.e.) a whole Hunt, and half Hunt twenty times, and not one; and the same whole Hunt, and half Hunt twice, as appears by the following Figures, where they stand two and two together; one of which is the whole Hunt, and the other the half Hunt: for Example, the 2 highest Figures are 1.2 where the treble is the whole Hunt, and the second the half Hunt. The two next Figures are 1.3 where the treble is the whole Hunt, and the third the half Hunt; and likewise the two last, or lowest Figures, are 5.4 the fifth is the whole Hunt, and the fourth the half Hunt; and so of all the rest, the first Figure representing the whole Hunt, and the next to it the half Hunt.

1.2 2.1 3.1 4.1 5.1 1.3 2.3 3.2 4.2 5.2 1.4 2.4 3.4 4.3 5.3 1.5 2.5 3.5 4.5 5.4

So that there being twenty Hunts, and every one making eight Six-scores (as in the Example of treble and second) that is twenty (which are the number of Hunts;) multiplied by eight (which are the number of Six-scores made by each Hunt) does produce Eight-score several wayes to Ring the Six-score Changes.

In the Six-score Changes are comprehended the Twenty-four, and the Six Changes: The Twenty-four Changes are made between the half Hunt, and the three Extream Bells; and the Six are made between the Extream Bells alone: The half Hunt in the Six-score, is the whole Hunt in the Twenty-four; and there is one Change in the Twenty-four made every time the whole Hunt comes before and behind the Bells; and one Change in the Six made every Extream: So that the Six-score rightly understood, is nothing else but hunting the half Hunt through every Change of the Six, which makes Twenty-four Changes: and then hunting the whole Hunt through each Change of the Twenty-four, which makes Six-score; for instance, in the first Six-score before set down, where the treble is the whole Hunt, the second the half Hunt, and the 345 the Extream Bells.

I take the Extream Bells, and set down the six Changes on them thus.—

345 435 453 543 534 354 345

Now I take the first of the six, which is 345, and set the second (which was the half Hunt in the Six-score) to it, and hunt it up behind thus.—

2345 3245 3425 3452

Now I take the second Change of the six, which is 435, and set it directly under 345, and the second Bell to it, and hunt it down thus.—

4352 4325 4235 2435

The second being hunted through the Change, I take the third Change in the six, which is 453, and hunt the second Bell through it, as before.—

2453 4253 4523 4532

And in the same course, the second being hunted through each Change of the six, will make Twenty-four, one Change of the six, hunting the second Bell through it, makes four Changes; so that the six Changes by hunting the second through each of them, will make six times four Changes (i.e.) Twenty-four. And now hunt the Treble through each of the Twenty-four Changes, and 'twill make Six-score; the first of the Twenty-four is 2345, take the Treble, and hunt it through it thus.—

12345 21345 23145 23415 23451

Now take the next Change of the Twenty-four, which is 3245, set it under the other Change, and hunt the Treble through it thus.—

32451 32415 32145 31245 13245

And in the same manner, hunting the Treble through each Change of the Twenty-four, will produce Twenty-four times five Changes, which makes Six-score; one Change of the Twenty-four (in hunting the Treble through it) makes five Changes.

In every Six-score on 5 Bells, there are 6 Extream Changes, there being twenty Changes from one Extream to another.

It would be an endless undertaking to set down all these Peals at large, but for the convenience of the Learner, I have set down some part of several of them, which may with ease be prickt out to the end of each Peal, as the Learner pleases.

Note, That in the following Peals there is a Line drawn at each Extream Change between the Figures, to shew where the Extreams are made; as in the next Peal there is a Line drawn between the Figures just 20 Changes from the beginning of the Peal, the change next after the Line is the Extream Change, which is 14352, and so of the rest; the Change next following each Line is the Extream.

Treble and second both up, Extream between the two farthest Extream Bells from the half Hunt.

12345 21345 23145 23415 23451 32451 32415 32145 31245 13245 13425 31425 34125 34215 34251 34521 34512 34152 31452 13452 ——- 14352 41352 43152 43512 43521 43251 43215 43125 41325 14325 14235 41235 42135 42315 42351 24351 24315 24135 21435 12435 ——- 12453 21453 24153 24513 24531 42531 42513 42153 41253 14253 14523 41523 45123 45213 45231 45321 45312 45132 41532 14532 ——- 15432 51432 54132 54312 54321 54231 54213 54123 51423 15423 15243 51243 52143 52413 52431 25431 25413 25143 21543 12543 ——- 12534 21534 25134 25314 25341 52341 52314 52134 51234 15234 15324 51324 53124 53214 53241 53421 53412 53142 51342 15342 ——- 13542 31542 35142 35412 35421 35241 35214 35124 31524 13524 13254 31254 32154 32514 32541 23541 23514 23154 21354 12354 ——- 12345

Treble up, fifth down, Extreams between the two farthest Extream Bells from the half Hunt.

12345 21345 23145 23415 23451 23541 23514 23154 21354 12354 12534 21534 25134 25314 25341 52341 52314 52134 51234 15234 ——- 15243 51243 52143 52413 52431 25431 25413 25143 21543 12543 12453 21453 24153 24513 24531 24351 24315 24135 21435 12435 ——- 14235 41235 42135 42315 42351 42531 42513 42153 41253 14253 14523 41523 45123 45213 45231 54231 54213 54123 51423 15423 ——- 15432 51432 54132 54312 54321 45321 45312 45132 41532 14532 14352 41352 43152 43512 43521 43251 43215 43125 41325 14325 ——- 13425 31425 34125 34215 34251 34521 34512 34152 31452 13452 13542 31542 35142 35412 35421 53421 53412 53142 51342 15342 ——- 15324 51324 53124 53214 53241 35241 35214 35124 31524 13524 13254 31254 32154 32514 32541 32451 32415 32145 31245 13245 ——- 12345

Second down, and fourth up, Extream between the two farthest Bells from the half Hunt.

12345 21345 21354 12354 13254 13524 13542 ——- 31542 31524 31254 32154 23154 23145 32145 31245 31425 31452 34152 34125 34215 32415 23415 24315 42315 43215 43125 43152 ——- 43512 43521 43251 42351 24351 23451

Second and third both down, Extream between the two farthest Extream Bells from the half Hunt.

12345 21345 23145 32145 31245 31425 31452 ——- 31542 31524 31254 32154 23154 21354 12354 13254 13524 13542 15342 15324 15234 12534 21534 21543 12543 15243 15423 15432 51432 51423 51243 52143

Third and fifth both up, Extream between the two farthest Extream Bells from the half Hunt.

12345 12435 12453 ——- 21453 21435 21345 23145 32145 32154 23154 21354 21534 21543 25143 25134 25314 23514 32514 35214 53214 52314 52134 52143 ——- 52413 52431

Fourth down, Treble up, Extream between the two nearest Extream Bells to the half Hunt.

12345 12435 14235 41235 42135 24135 21435 21345 21354 23154 23145 23415 24315 42315 42351 24351 23451 23541 23514 ——- 25314 25341 25431 24531 42531 42513 24513 25413 25143 25134 21534 21543 21453 24153 42153 41253 14253 12453 12543 12534 ——- 15234 15243 15423 14523 41523 45123 54123 51423 51243 51234 52134 52143 52413 54213 45213 45231 54231 52431 52341 52314 ——- 53214 53241

Fifth down, treble up, Extream Changes between the two farthest Extream Bells from the Half Hunt.

12345 12354 12534 15234 51234 52134 25134 21534 21354 21345 23145 23154 23514 25314 52314 52341 25341 23541 23451 23415 32415 32451 32541 35241 53241 53214 35214 32514 32154 32145 31245 31254

Treble & second both down.

12345 12354 21354 23154 23514 23541 32541 32514 32154 31254 13254 13524 31524 35124 35214 35241 35421

Second & treble both down.

12345 21345 21354 12354 13254 13524 13542 31542 31524 31254 32154 23154 23514 32514 35214 35124 35142 35412



The Changes on six Bells.

On six Bells there are Seven-hundred and twenty Changes to be made; but there are Peals of Six-score and Twelve-score Changes to be Rang on them. The Six-score Changes are to be made, by observing a whole Hunt and half Hunt, which are to be hunted in the same course, as in the Six-score on five Bells, and the Extream Changes to be made by the same Rule as they were on five Bells. The only difference between the Six-score on six Bells, and those on five, are this; whereas on five there are but three Extream Bells, on six there are four Extream Bells. And on five Bells, there are six Extream Changes in every Six-score; but on six, there are but four Extream Changes. And moreover, whereas in every Six-score on five Bells, the Changes were the same in each, although altered in course; but the Changes on six Bells are not the same in each, for several Six-scores has several Changes, one Six-score having many Changes which another has not, as in this Peal, treble and second both up, which is,

123456 213456 231456 234156 234516 234561 324561 324516 324156 321456 312456 132456 134256 314256 341256 342156 342516 342561 345261 345216 345126 341526 314526 134526 134562 314562 341562 345162 345612 345621 ——— 435621 435612 435162 431562 413562 143562 143526 413526 431526 435126 435216 435261 432561 432516 432156 431256 413256 143256 142356 412356 421356 423156 423516 423561 243561 243516 243156 241356 214356 124356 ——— 124365 214365 241365 243165 243615 243651 423651 423615 423165 421365 412365 142365 143265 413265 431265 432165 432615 432651 436251 436215 436125 431625 413625 143625 143652 413652 431652 436152 436512 436521 ——— 346521 346512 346152 341652 314652 134652 134625 314625 341625 346125 346215 346251 342651 342615 342165 341265 314265 134265 132465 312465 321465 324165 324615 324651 234651 234615 234165 231465 213465 123465 ——— 123456

There are other Peals to be Rang on six Bells, as Six-scores on the five smallest, the tenor lying behind all the way. Treble and second, or treble and fifth, with the tenor lying behind, makes very good Musick: Of which Peals I need not give you any Example, these Six-scores being the same with those on five Bells set down before.

The Twelve-score Changes being only part of the Seven-hundred and twenty, and consequently the course of each being one and the same, I will therefore shew the course and method of the Seven-hundred and twenty, wherein the Twelve-score Changes are also included.

In Ringing the Seven-hundred and Twenty, there is a whole Hunt, a half Hunt, a quarter Hunt, and three Extream Bells; the whole Hunt and half Hunt does hunt in the same course and method, as they did in the Six-score on five Bells, and in the last Six-score; and the quarter Hunt removes in the same course under the half Hunt, as the half Hunt does under the whole Hunt: for instance, when the whole Hunt is hunted either before or behind the Bells, then the half Hunt removes over one Bell; and when the half Hunt is removed before or behind the quarter Hunt and Extream Bells (at which time in a Six-score the Extream is made) then the quarter Hunt removes over one Bell, in the same course as the half hunt moves, when the whole Hunt is before or behind. An Example I will set down, which is 1, 2 and 3 all up, that is to say, treble the whole Hunt, and to hunt up, second the half Hunt, and to half hunt up, and third the quarter Hunt, and to quarter hunt up 4, 5 and 6 are Extream Bells; there is alwayes an Extream Change to be made when the quarter Hunt comes before or behind the Extream Bells, there are two wayes to make the Extreams, which are the same here, as in the Six-score on five, and made by the same Rule, I will here make it between the two farthest Extream Bells from the quarter Hunt. Now the treble and second being the whole Hunt and half Hunt, must be hunted in the same course, as in the Six-score on five Bells, after this manner.

123456 213456 231456 234156 234516 234561 324561 324516 324156 321456 312456 132456 134256 314256 341256 342156 342516 342561 345261 345216 345126 341526 314526 134526 134562 314562 341562 345162 345612 345621

The half Hunt being hunted up, the third is to remove up over one Bell, and then the whole Hunt and half Hunt to remove again thus.

435621 435612 435162 431562 413562 143562 143526 413526 431526 435126 435216 435261 432561 432516 432156 431256 413256 143256 142356 412356 421356 423156 423516 423561 243561 243516 243156 241356 214356 124356

The whole Hunt and half Hunt being hunted down, the quarter Hunt must remove up over the fifth, and then the whole Hunt and half Hunt must hunt up again, as in the following Changes.

124536 214536 241536 245136 245316 245361 425361 425316 425136 421536 412536 142536 145236 415236 451236 452136 452316 452361 453261 453216 453126 451326 415326 145326 145362 415362 451362 453162 453612 453621

The whole Hunt and half Hunt being hunted up, the quarter Hunt must be removed quite up over the sixth, as in this Change

456321

the quarter Hunt being hunted up behind the Extream Bells, yet the Extream Change is not to be made, until the whole Hunt and half Hunt have both removed thorough the Bells, as in these Changes.

456312 456132 451632 415632 145632 145623 415623 451623 456123 456213 456231 452631 452613 452163 451263 415263 145263 142563 412563 421563 425163 425613 425631 245631 245613 245163 241563 214563 124563

It is to be observed for a constant Rule, that when the quarter Hunt removes either quite up behind the Extream Bells, or down before them, the whole Hunt and half Hunt must hunt through the Bells before the Extream Change is to be made, as appears by the last Changes.

The Extream Change is now to be made between the 4 and 5, being the two farthest Extream Bells from the third, which is the quarter Hunt, thus.—

125463

The Extream being made, the whole Hunt, half Hunt, and quarter Hunt must be hunted as before; and first the whole Hunt and half Hunt are to be hunted up, as in these Changes.

215463 251463 254163 254613 254631 524631 524613 524163 521463 512463 152463 154263 514263 541263 542163 542613 542631 546231 546213 546123 541623 514623 154623 154632 514632 541632 546132 546312 546321

The whole Hunt and half Hunt being hunted up, the quarter Hunt must hunt down under the sixth, which is the next Bell to it, and then the whole Hunt and half Hunt must hunt down again, as in the Changes following.

543621 543612 543162 541362 514362 154362 154326 514326 541326 543126 543216 543261 542361 542316 542136 541236 514236 154236 152436 512436 521436 524136 524316 524361 254361 254316 254136 251436 215436 125436

The quarter Hunt must be hunted down under the Fourth, and then the whole Hunt and half Hunt are to hunt up again, as appears by these changes.

125346 215346 251346 253146 253416 253461 523461 523416 523146 521346 512346 152346 153246 513246 531246 532146 532416 532461 534261 534216 534126 531426 513426 153426 153462 513462 531462 534162 534612 534621

Now the quarter hunt is to be hunted down before the Extream Bells, and then the whole Hunt and half Hunt to hunt again before the Extream Change is made.

354621 354612 354162 351462 315462 135462 135426 315426 351426 354126 354216 354261 352461 352416 352146 351246 315246 135246 132546 312546 321546 325146 325416 325461 235461 235416 235146 231546 213546 123546

The quarter Hunt being before the Extream Bells, the Extream Change is to be made:

Here are just Twelve-score Changes already set down, and the Bells may either be brought round, and so make an end at the Twelve-score, or else proceed forward to the end of the Seven hundred and twenty. If the bells are not brought round here, they cannot come round, until the Seven-hundred and twenty Changes are all made, and then they come round in course. To bring the Bells round at the end of these Twelve-score Changes, the Extream is to be made between the 5 and 4, which were the two Bells that made the last Extream Change, and brings them round in their right places again, as appears by these figures

123456.

There are but two Extream Changes in every Twelve-score, wherein 'tis constantly observed, that the last Extream Change is to be made between those two Bells which made the first Extream, otherwise the Bells would not come round at the end of the Twelve-score.

Here I have somewhat deviated from my directions before, in making the Extream Changes; for in the last Change, which is 123456, I made the Extream between the two nearest Extream Bells to the quarter Hunt; but the Twelve-score Changes are an imperfect Peal, being only a third part of the Changes which are to be made on six Bells, and therefore not to be brought round, unless the last Extream Change is made out of course. To have proceeded forward in the 720, the last Extream should have been made between the 4 and 6, which are the two farthest Extream Bells from the quarter Hunt, the Change next before the Extream, is 123546; now the 4 and 6 making an Extream Change, the Bells stand thus, 123564; the Extream being made, the whole hunt, half hunt, and quarter hunt are to be hunted as before, and the Extream Changes to be made between the two farthest Extream Bells from the quarter hunt, which course will bring the Bells round in their right places at the end of the 720. In every 720, there are six Extream Changes, there being Six-score Changes between each. The Twelve-score Changes are to be Rang with any whole hunt, half hunt, and quarter hunt, observing to make the last Extream Change between those two Bells which made the first.

The 720 plain Changes are to be rang or set down One thousand four hundred and forty several wayes, by altering the whole hunt, half hunt, quarter hunt, and Extream Bells (but the course of each is the same with that which is before set down) which I thus demonstrate. On 6 Bells, there are 120 several hunts, (viz.) a whole hunt, half hunt, and quarter hunt Six-score several times, and not one and the same whole hunt, half hunt, and quarter hunt twice, as appears by these Figures.—

123 213 312 412 512 612 124 214 314 413 513 613 125 215 315 415 514 614 126 216 316 416 516 615 132 231 321 421 521 621 134 234 324 423 523 623 135 235 325 425 524 624 136 236 326 426 526 625 142 241 341 431 531 631 143 243 342 432 532 632 145 245 345 435 534 634 146 246 346 436 536 635 152 251 351 451 541 641 153 253 352 452 542 642 154 254 354 453 543 643 156 256 356 456 546 645 162 261 361 461 561 651 163 263 362 462 562 652 164 264 364 463 563 653 165 265 365 465 564 654 —- —- —- —- —- —-

These Figures stand three and three together, each three represents the three Hunts; that is, the first is the whole Hunt, the second Figure the half Hunt, and the third the quarter Hunt; for Example, the first three are 123, the treble is the whole Hunt, the second the half Hunt, and the third the quarter Hunt: The next three Figures are 124, there the treble is the whole Hunt, the second the half Hunt, and the fourth the quarter Hunt; and the last three Figures are 654, where the sixth is the whole Hunt, the fifth the half Hunt, and the fourth the quarter Hunt, and so of all the rest.

With one whole Hunt, half Hunt, and quarter Hunt, the Seven-hundred and twenty Changes are to be Rang, or set down twelve several wayes; for instance, take the first three Hunts in these Figures, which are 123, where the treble is the whole Hunt, the second the half Hunt, and the third the quarter Hunt, which may be hunted six several wayes, as followeth.

Treble, second and third, all up. Treble and second up, third down. Treble up, second and third down. Treble, second and third, all down. Treble and second down, third up. Treble down, second and third up.

Each of these are to be Rang two wayes, one is to make the Extreams between the two farthest Extream Bells from the quarter Hunt, and the other way is to make the Extream between the two next Bells to the quarter Hunt.

By treble, second and third all up, is meant, that the treble is the whole hunt, and to hunt up the first Change at the beginning of the Peal; the second is the half hunt, and to half hunt up; that is, to move up towards the hindmost Bells the first time it moves at the beginning of the Peal; and the third is the quarter hunt, and to move likewise toward the hindmost Bells the first time it removes. And by treble and second up, and third down, is meant, that the treble and second are to move up towards the hindmost Bell, the first time each removes at the beginning of the Peal; and the third being the quarter hunt, is to move down the first time, which are only directions for moving the hunts at first, because they may be hunted either up or down.

Sometimes it happens, that the hunts cannot be hunted that way which is proposed, as in the 720, treble, second and third all down.—

123456

The whole hunt which is the treble, should now be hunted down; but it being already before the Bells, insomuch that it can be removed no lower; I should therefore remove the half hunt down, but that being also down as low as it can go, I should move the quarter hunt; and that being also down before the Extream Bells, I can move it no lower, unless I should move it down under the second, which is the half hunt, which must not be done; for when the quarter hunt is down next before the Extream Bell, it must be removed no lower; and when it is up next behind Extream Bell, it is to be removed up no higher; therefore it being now before the Extream Bell, the Extream Change is to be made the first of all; and when that is done, the treble, second and third must be hunted up in course. Or if you make treble and second down, and third up, then the first Change is to be made, by moving the quarter Hunt up over one Bell. And again, if you make Treble and Tenor both up, and Third down, first hunt up the Treble, and then the Tenor, which is the half Hunt, should be moved up; but it being already behind, the quarter Hunt, which is the Third, must move under one Bell, and then the whole Hunt and half are to hunt in course after each other: Many Examples of this Nature I could set down, which for brevity sake I omit.

I might demonstrate how the 720 are to be Rang twelve wayes, with each of the Six-score Hunts, as I did that of treble, second and third; but I think that altogether needless, since that Example makes it most plain and easie to be understood: But I will give a general Rule for hunting any whole Hunt, half Hunt, and quarter Hunt, so as to produce six several wayes to Ring the 720 Changes, which is this:

Whole Hunt, half Hunt, and quarter Hunt, all hunted up. Whole Hunt, and half Hunt hunted up, and quarter Hunt down. Whole Hunt hunted up, half Hunt and quarter Hunt down. Whole Hunt, half Hunt, and quarter Hunt hunted down. Whole Hunt and half Hunt hunted down, and quarter Hunt up. Whole Hunt hunted down, half Hunt and quarter Hunt hunted up.

Which is a general Rule to Ring the 720 six wayes on any one of the Six-score Hunts; each of which six wayes, may be Rang two wayes more, by altering the Extream Changes, one of which is to make the Extream Changes between the two next Extream Bells to the quarter Hunt, and the other way is to make the Extreams between the two farthest Extream Bells from it.

The 720 Changes are to be Rang 12 wayes with one whole Hunt, half Hunt, and quarter Hunt; so that with the Six-score Hunts, it is to be Rang Six-score times twelve wayes, which makes One thousand four hundred and forty several wayes to Ring this 720 plain Changes.

In the 720, the half Hunt, the quarter Hunt, and the three Extream Bells, makes the Six-score Changes on 5 Bells in a perfect course, the half Hunt and quarter hunt in the 720, being the whole Hunt and half Hunt in the Six-score; for Example, take the 23456, and set down the Six-score Changes on them, making the second the whole hunt, and the third the half hunt; which when you have set down, then take the Treble, and hunt it through every Change of that Six-score, and it will make 720 Changes, the same with those which I have set down before, The Twenty-four Changes on four Bells, and the six changes on three Bells, have also a perfect course in the 720, in the same manner as I told you they had in the Six-scores on five Bells. There is always one change in the Six-score made every time the whole hunt comes before or behind the bells, which is every sixth change; and there's one change of the Twenty-four made, every time the whole hunt and half hunt comes before or behind the bells, which is once in thirty changes; and one change of the six made every extream, that is once in six-score changes. You may take the six-score changes on five bells, treble the whole, and second the half hunt, before set down; and hunt the sixth bell through every change of that six score, which will make the 720 changes; Tenor the whole hunt, Treble the half hunt, and Second the quarter hunt.

This is not material for a Learner to know, it being only for the instructions of those that know how to Ring it, but yet are ignorant of the true grounds thereof; therefore I have dissected it, and shewed the grounds of each part of it.

In this place, I will add a word or two to those that practise to Ring the Changes.

They that Ring the extream bells in the Twenty-four changes, must mind and observe the motion of the hunt, that they may the better know when to make the extream changes; and likewise in a six-score on five bells, he that Rings the half hunt, must observe the motion of the whole hunt; and they that Ring the extream bells, must observe the motions both of the whole hunt, and half hunt, that they may know when the half hunt is to move, and also when to make the extream changes; or else he that does Ring the half hunt, may give notice of the extream changes (by saying Extream) the change next before the extream is to be made. The same is to be observed in the changes on six bells. The whole hunt is the easiest bell to Ring in any changes, the half hunt is more plain and easie to Ring, than an extream bell. All changes are to be Rang either by walking them (as the term is) or else Whole-pulls, or Half-pulls. By walking them, is meant, that the bells go round, four, six, eight times, or more, in one change, which is commonly used by young Practisers; it may be sometimes on five bells, Ringing the Twenty-four changes on the treble, second, third, and fourth, the fifth bell striking behind every change; and many other changes of the like nature may be practised this way by young Ringers. Whole-pulls, is to Ring two Rounds in one change, that is, Fore-stroke and Back-stroke, and in a change; so that every time you pull down the bells at Sally, you make a new change differing from that at the Back-stroke next before; this Whole-pulls was altogether practised in former time, but of late there is a more quick and ready way practised, called Half-pulls, which is—only one round in a change, that is, one change made at the Fore-stroke, and another at the Back-stroke, which way is now altogether in use (unless it be at some great bells, which are too weighty to be managed up so high a Compass at the Back-stroke, as Half-pulls requires) it being now a common thing in London to Ring the 720 Changes, Trebles and Doubles, and Grandsire Bob, Half-pulls, (which is commonly Rang with so round and quick a Compass, that in the space of half an hour, or little more, the 720 Changes are Rang out from the beginning to the end.) And also the Six-scores Doubles and Singles, Old Doubles, Grandsire, and many other cross Peals on five bells, are commonly Rang Half-pulls.

In Ringing Half-pulls some Peals do cut Compass, that is—the whole hunt comes to lead at the Back-stroke, to remedy which, make the first change of the Peal at the Back-stroke.

By these following Rules, you shall know what Peals do cut Compass, and what not (i.e.) of plain and single changes. On six Bells,

In hunting either the treble, the third, or the fifth bells down, cuts Compass; hunting them up, does not cut Compass.

In hunting the second, fourth, or sixth bells up, cuts Compass; but hunting them down, does not cut Compass.

These Rules (leaving out the Tenor) serves for five bells; and leaving out the fifth and Tenor, they serve for four bells.



The Twelve score LONG HUNTS: Or the ESQUIRE'S Twelve-score.

This Peal is to be Rang on six bells, having two whole hunts, and one half hunt; the common way of Ringing, it is to make the fifth and Tenor the whole hunts, and the Treble the half hunt. The Tenor and fifth does each hunt down by turns, and when either of them comes down before the bells, it leads twice, and then hunts up again.

The Treble, second, third, and fourth, makes the Twenty-four changes, one of which is made every time either of the whole hunts leads: For instance, the Tenor is first to be hunted down, thus.—

123456 123465 123645 126345 162345 612345

The tenor being hunted down, and lying before the bells, there is one change in the Twenty-four now to be made between treble and second, thus.—

621345

The tenor is to be hunted up into its place, and the fifth hunts down.—

261345 216345 213645 213465 213456 213546 215346 251346 521346

The fifth being now before the bells, there is another change in the Twenty-four to be made between the treble and third, as in this change.—

523146

The fifth is now to hunt up, and the tenor to hunt down again, in which course they continue to the end of the Peal, observing to make an extream change, when the treble (which is the hunt in the Twenty-four) comes before or behind the extream bells.

253146 235146 231546 231456 231465 231645

This Peal may be Rang by making the Twenty-four changes Doubles and Singles, in the place of the Twenty-four plain Changes, and many other wayes, which I leave to the Learner to practise.



The Variety of Changes on any Number of Bells.

The changes on bells do multiply infinitely. On two bells there are two changes. On three bells are three times as many changes as there are on two; that is—three times two changes, which makes six. On four bells there are four times as many changes as on three; that is—four times six changes, which makes Twenty-four. On five bells there are five times as many changes as there are on four bells; that is—five times Twenty-four changes, which makes Six-score. On six bells are six times as many changes as there are on five; that is—six times Six-score changes, which makes Seven-hundred and twenty: And in the same manner, by increasing the number of bells, they multiply innumerably, as in the Table of Figures next following; where each of the Figures in the Column of the left hand, standing directly under one another (which are 1.2.3.4.5.6.7.8.9.10.11.12.) do represent the number of bells; and the Figures going along towards the right hand, directly from each of those twelve Figures, are the number of changes to be rung on that number of bells which the Figure represents: For Example, the uppermost Figure on the left hand is 2, which stands for two bells; and the Figure next to it on the right hand is also 2, which stands for two changes; that is to say, on two bells there are two changes. The next Figure below in the left Column is 3, which stands for three Bells; and the Figure next to it on the right hand is 6, which stands for six changes; that is—on three bells are six changes, and so of the rest as follows.

bells changes

2 2 3 6 4 24 5 120 6 720 7 5040 8 40320 9 362880 10 3628800 11 39916800 12 479001600

The lowest of these figures are 479001600, that is, Four hundred seventy nine Millions, one thousand six hundred, which are all the changes that can be made on twelve bells: And supposing that twelve men should take 12 bells with intent to ring the changes on them, they would be Seventy five Years, ten Months, one Week and three Dayes in ringing them, according to the proportion of ringing 720 changes in an hour; reckoning 24 hours to the day, and 365 dayes in the Year.

Having given Directions for all sorts of plain and single Changes, I will now proceed to Cross-peals, and first to Doubles and Singles on four Bells.



Doubles And Singles on four Bells.

On four bells there are 24 changes to be made Doubles and Singles, wherein are twelve double changes, and 12 single; next to every double change, there is a single; so that 2 double changes do not come together in any place throughout the Peal, neither does two single changes at any time come together; but one change is double, and the next is single, to the end of the Peal. Every double change is made between the four bells; that is—there are two changes made at one time, between the bells in treble and seconds places, and the bells in third and fourths places. Every single change is made between the two bells in the middle (i.e.) in seconds and thirds places; excepting the extream changes, which are single, and made between the two farthest extream bells from the Hunt. An Example I here set down, making the treble the Hunt, and I hunt it up at the beginning of the Peal (for it may be hunted either up or down at pleasure) and I make an extream change every time the whole Hunt comes before the bells. In ringing it, 'tis observed, that every bell hunts in course, and lies twice before, and twice behind, except only when the extream is to be made, and then the two farthest extream bells from the Hunt, does make a dodge, and then moves in their former course, as in these changes.—

1234 2143 2413 4231 4321 3412 3142 1324

Now the hunt is before the bells, there is an extream change made between the two farthest bells from it, which are the 2 and 4, thus.—

1342

The extream change being made, the bells are to move, as before, observing to make an extream change every time the whole hunt comes before the bells.

3124 3214 2341 2431 4213 4123 1432 1423 4132 4312 3421 3241 2314 2134 1243 1234

In this last Twenty-four, the treble is hunted up at the beginning; it may be rang by hunting it down, which is to be down, by making the first a single change, and then hunt it up as before.

With one hunt this Peal may be rang six wayes (viz.) three wayes in hunting it up at the beginning of each Peal, and the other three wayes by hunting it down; the three wayes in hunting it up, differs only in making the extream changes; in one of the three wayes you must make an extream change every time the hunt comes before the bells to lead, as in the Twenty-four changes before set down. Another way is to make an extream every time the hunt comes behind. And the third way, is to make an extream every time the hunt comes before and behind the bells. The three wayes in hunting it down, are to be rang by making the extream changes, as in the three wayes before; in hunting one bell, there are six wayes to ring this Peal; therefore with the four bells (in making each of them to hunt) there are four times six wayes to ring it, which makes Twenty-four several wayes. And for the benefit of the Learner, I have set down certain Rules, shewing how to begin any of the aforesaid Peals (viz.)

In hunting either the treble or third up, the first change is double; but in hunting either of them down, the first is single.

In hunting the second or the fourth up, the first change is single; but in hunting either of them down, the first change in each Peal must be double.



Doubles and Singles on five Bells.

There is a Peal to be rang on five bells, called Doubles and Singles, wherein are Six-score several changes, sixty of which are double changes, and sixty are single; the double and single changes are so intermixt, that two double changes does not at any time come together in the Six-score; neither are two single changes made next to each other in any part of this Peal, but one change is double, and the next single, in which course they are made to the end. Every double change is made between the four foremost bells (i.e.) in treble, second, third, and fourth places. When the whole hunt is hunting up, each single change is made between the whole hunt, and the next bell above it. In hunting down the single changes are made between the whole hunt, and the next bell below it, the whole hunt being alwayes one of the two bells which makes every single change, except only when it leads, and then the single change is made in third and fourths places; but the extream is also a single change, and made (when the whole hunt leads) between the two farthest extream bells from the half hunt; the half hunt is to lie either before or behind the extream bells, when the extream changes are made, of which I shall shew you more anon.

In this Peal there is a whole hunt, a half hunt, and three extream Bells; the whole hunt in a direct course does hunt up and down, and lies twice before, and twice behind all the way; every other bell leads twice together throughout the Peal.

And when the whole hunt leaves the thirds place, hunting up, then every bell that comes into second and thirds places, does lie in each of those places twice together, until the whole hunt comes down again into thirds place, at which time the bell in fourths place lies there twice, and then makes a dodge with the bell in thirds place (unless an extream change is to be made) and so removes directly down before the bells. And that bell which comes into the tenors place (when the whole hunt leaves that place hunting down) lies still there, until the whole hunt removes up into that place again, except only when the extream is made behind, and then the bell in fourths place moves into tenors place, and lies there until the whole hunt moves up into that place.

With one whole hunt, and half hunt, this Peal may be rang six wayes, in three of which the whole hunt is to be hunted up at the beginning of each Peal, which three wayes differs only in making the extream changes. One way, is to make an extream change every time the half hunt comes before the extream bells, as in the following Six-score. The second way, is to make an extream change every time the half hunt comes behind the extream bells. And the third way, is to make an extream every time, the half hunt comes before and behind the extream bells. In this last way there are six extreams in each Peal, but in the other two ways there are but three extreams in each Peal.

The three wayes aforesaid, are to be rang, by hunting up the whole hunt; but it may be rang three wayes more, in hunting down the same whole hunt, in which three ways the extreams are to be made, as I shewed you before. The whole hunt is alwayes to lead when every extream change is made.

This Peal I have set down at large, making the treble the whole hunt, the second the half hunt; and an extream change every time the half hunt comes before the extream bells, as in the following changes. I have drawn a Line between the figures at the extream changes, that next below the Line is the extream.

12345 21435 24135 42315 42351 24531 24513 42153 41253 14523 14253 41523 45123 54213 54231 45321 45312 54132 51432 15342 15432 51342 53142 35412 35421 53241 53214 35124 31524 13254 13524 31254 32154 23514 23541 32451 32415 23145 21345 12435 ——- 12453 21543 25143 52413 52431 25341 25314 52134 51234 15324 15234 51324 53124 35214 35241 53421 53412 35142 31542 13452 13542 31452 34152 43512 43521 34251 34215 43125 41325 14235 14325 41235 42135 24315 24351 42531 42513 24153 21453 12543 ——- 12534 21354 23154 32514 32541 23451 23415 32145 31245 13425 13245 31425 34125 43215 43251 34521 34512 43152 41352 14532 14352 41532 45132 54312 54321 45231 45213 54123 51423 15243 15423 51243 52143 25413 25431 52341 52314 25134 21534 12354 ——- 12345

This Peal may be rang Six-score several wayes; there being twenty hunts on five bells (that is—a whole hunt, and half hunt twenty times on five bells, and not one and the same whole hunt and half hunt twice, as I shewed more at large in the plain changes on five bells before set down) and with each hunt, that is, with one whole hunt and half hunt, it may be rang six wayes; so that multiply twenty, (which are the number of hunts) by six, (which are the number of Peals to be rung on each hunt) and it will produce Six-score several wayes to ring it.

It may be prick't, or rang Six-score several wayes more, by making the extream changes when the whole hunt lies behind the bells, but those wayes are never practised; neither do I think it material to say any thing more of them in this place, having only inserted this, to shew the great variety there is in this Peal. It being somewhat difficult to know the true way of beginning each Peal, I have therefore set down certain Rules, shewing how the first changes in each are to be made.

In hunting the treble, the third, or the fifth bells up, the first change in each Peal is to be made double.

In hunting the treble down, the first change is single in third and fourths places, unless the half hunt lies so, as that the extream is to be made.

In hunting the third or fifth down, the first change is to be made single, between the whole hunt, and the next bell below it.

In hunting up the second or fourth, the first change in each Peal is single, between the whole hunt, and the next bell above it.

In hunting down the second or fourth, the first change is to be made double.

Every double change in all the Peals of Doubles and Singles, is made between the four foremost bells; that is—in treble, second, third and fourths places.



Tendring's Six-score on five Bells.

In this Peal are contained Six-score changes, which are Doubles and Singles, there being sixty double changes in it, and sixty single, which are so intermixt, that two double changes does not come together in any part of the Peal; neither are there 2 single changes at any time made together, but one change is double, and the next to it is single; in which course the changes are all made to the end of the Peal. Every single change is made between the 2 hindmost bells. There is a whole hunt and half hunt in it. The observation in ringing it, is this: When the whole hunt lies before the bells, and is to hunt up, first it moves up into seconds place, where it lies twice; then into thirds place, where it lies also twice; then into the fourths place, where it lies once; and in the tenors place once: Then it makes a dodge with the bell in fourths place, after which it lies twice behind; then it moves down into fourths place, and makes a dodge with the bell in tenors place, and then moves down into thirds place, where it lies twice, and in the seconds place twice, and then it leads four times; after which, it hunts again, as before. The course of the other four bells are exactly the same with that of the whole hunt, in moving up and down, except only when the Bob changes are made, and then they differ; but after the Bobs are made, their course is the same as before; every bell lies four times together before the bells, and twice in the seconds place without any alteration. In this Peal are two sorts of Bobs; one of which is called a double Bob, and the other a single Bob. The Rule for making the double Bob is this, when the whole hunt is hunting down, and lies in the seconds place, and the half hunt lies behind, then there's a double Bob; that is, two Bob-changes; one of which is made the next change, wherein the whole hunt moves down to lead; where having led four times, there is then another Bob-change to be made, in which the whole hunt moves up into the seconds place. The Rule for making the single Bob, is this, when the whole hunt has led four times, and the half hunt lies in thirds place; then the next change following is a single Bob, that is—one Bob-change, in which the whole hunt moves out of the trebles place up into the seconds place, every Bob is a double change, and made between the two first, and two last bells, the bell in thirds place lying still when each Bob is made, where it lies four times together, and then moves down; every time the whole hunt comes before the bells, there is either a single Bob, or a double Bob made. At every double Bob, those two bells that do dodge behind at the first Bob-change, continues dodging until the whole hunt moves up, and parts them: And likewise at the single Bob, those 2 bells which do dodge behind at the Bob-change, continue dodging until the whole hunt moves up, and parts them, as in the following changes, where the treble is the whole hunt, the tenor the half hunt, and the first is a Bob-change, being supposed to be the second Bob-change of a double Bob.

12345 21354 21345 23154 23145 32415 32451 34215 34251 43521 43512 45321 45312 54132 54123 51432 51423 15243 15234 12543 12534 21543 21534 25143 25134 52314 52341 53214 53241 35421 35412 34521 34512 43152 43125 41352 41325 14352 14325 13452 13425 31452 31425 34152 34125 43215 43251 42315 42351 24531 24513 25431 25413 52143 52134 51243 51234 15324 15342 13524 13542 31524 31542 35124 35142 53412 53421 54312 54321 45231 45213 42531 42513 24153 24135 21453 21435 12453 12435 14253 14235 41253 41235 42153 42135 24315 24351 23415 23451 32541 32514 35241 35214 53124 53142 51324 51342 15432 15423 14532 14523 41532 41523 45132 45123 54213 54231 52413 52431 25341 25314 23541 23514 32154 32145 31254 31245 13254 13245 12354 12345

This Peal was made out of Grandsire on five bells, the Bob-changes in this, being the same with those in Grandsire, and made by the same Rule.



Paradox on five Bells.

This Peal of Paradox is to be rang on five bells, wherein are Six-score changes, they are Doubles and Singles; that is—one change double, and another single; in which course they are made to the end of the Peal. Every single change is made in second and thirds places, except only when the whole Hunt leads, and then 'tis made in third and fourths places; but the extream Changes are (also single) and made between the two farthest extream bells from the half Hunt; the whole Hunt lies before the bells, when every extream change is made. Every bell lies four times together before, and four times behind, except only when the extream changes are made behind. There is a whole Hunt, a half Hunt, and three extream bells; the course of the whole Hunt is this, it being before the bells, first it moves up into the second and thirds places, then it makes a dodge with the bell in seconds place, and moves out of the thirds place up into fourths, where it lies alwayes twice, then moves up behind, where it lies four times, and then moves down into fourths place, where having lay twice, it hunts down into seconds place, and makes a dodge with the bell in thirds place, and then moves down before the bells, where having lay twice, it hunts as before; each of the other bells has the same course (in hunting up and down) as the whole Hunt until the whole Hunt leads, at which time every bell that comes into seconds place lies there twice together, unless the extream change is to be made in second and thirds places.

In this following Peal the treble is the whole Hunt, and the second the half Hunt; the extream changes are made, when the half Hunt lies before the extream bells.

12435 21435 24135 21453 24153 42513 45213 42531 45231 54321 53421 54312 53412 35142 31542 35124 31524 13254 13524 15342 15432 51342 53142 51324 53124 35214 32514 35241 32541 23451 24351 23415 24315 42135 41235 42153 41253 14523 14253 12435 ——- 12453 21543 25143 21534 25134 52314 53214 52341 53241 35421 34521 35412 34512 43152 41352 43125 41325 14235 14325 13452 13542 31452 34152 31425 34125 43215 42315 43251 42351 24531 25431 24513 25413 52143 51243 52134 51234 15324 15234 12543 ——- 12534 21354 23154 21345 23145 32415 34215 32451 34251 43521 45321 43512 45312 54132 51432 54123 51423 15243 15423 14532 14352 41532 45132 41523 45123 54213 52413 54231 52431 25341 23541 25314 23514 32154 31254 32145 31245 13425 13245 12354 ——- 12345

I have drawn a Line between the Figures at the extream changes, that next below each Line is the extream; the first extream is Forty changes from the beginning.

This Peal is grounded on the Twenty-four changes Doubles and Singles on four bells. The half Hunt, and three extream bells in this Peal, makes the Twenty four changes in a perfect course. There are four changes made in the Twenty-four every time the whole Hunt leads, which coming before the bells six times in the Six-score, and each time lying there four times together, makes six times four changes, which is Twenty four. 'Tis easily made out, if you take every change that is made when the whole Hunt is before the bells in the Six-score before, and set the changes down by themselves (leaving out the treble) where you will find, that the second, third, fourth and fifth, make the Twenty-four changes Doubles and Singles, in a perfect course; second is the Hunt, and the extreams are made when the Hunt is before.

Paradox may be rang Six-score several wayes. With one whole Hunt, and half Hunt, it may be rang six wayes, in three of which the whole Hunt is to be hunted up; and in the other three wayes it is to be hunted down, in which six wayes the extream changes are to be made by the same Rules, and in the same manner, as I shewed before in the Six-score Doubles and Singles on five bells; so that with the twenty Hunts, it may be prick't or rang twenty times six wayes, which makes Six-score.

This Peal may be prick't Six-score wayes more, by making the extreams when the whole Hunt lies behind the bells, but that being never practised, I will say no more of it. I have here set down some general Rules for beginning the several Peals of Paradox by the former course (i.e.) in making the extreams when the whole Hunt is before the bells.

In hunting the treble up, the first change is double between the four first bells, thus.—

12345 21435

In hunting the treble down, the first change is single in third and fourths places

(thus.—12345 12435)

unless the half Hunt lies so, that the extreams may be made.

Second up, the first change is single in second and thirds places, thus.—

12345 13245

Second down, the first change is double between the four first bells.

Third up, the first change is double between the four first bells.

Third down, the first change is single in second and thirds places.

Fourth up, the first change is double between the four hindmost bells, thus.—

12345 13254

Fourth down, the first change is double between the four first bells.

Fifth up, the first change is single in second and thirds places.

Fifth down, the first change is double between the four hindmost bells.

If you observe these Rules aright, together with my former directions, you may with much ease prick down any Peal of Paradox.



PHOENIX. On five Bells.

This Peal has Six score changes in it, which are Doubles and Singles; the tenor is the whole Hunt, and the fourth the half Hunt. Every bell lies twice before, and four times behind; every single change is made in second and thirds places, and every bell that comes into fourths place, lies there twice together, until the tenor comes behind; at which time, the fourth lying in the seconds place, the next single change is made in third and fourths places; but the tenor lying behind, and the fourth in thirds place, then the two next following single changes are in third and fourths places.

12345 21354 23154 32514 35214 53241 52341 25431 24531 42513 45213 54123 51423 15432 14532 41352 43152 34125 34215 43125 41325 14352 13452 31542 35142 53124 51324 15234 12534 21543 25143 52413 54213 45231 42531 24351 23451 32415 32145 23415 23145 32154 31254 13524 15324 51342 53142 35412 34512 43521 45321 54231 52431 25413 24513 42153 41253 14235 14325 41235 42135 24153 21453 12543 15243 51234 52134 25314 23514 32541 35241 53421 54321 45312 43512 34152 31452 13425 13245 31425 31245 13254 12354 21534 25134 52143 51243 15423 14523 41532 45132 54312 53412 35421 34521 43251 42351 24315 24135 42315 43215 34251 32451 23541 25341 52314 53214 35124 31524 13542 15342 51432 54132 45123 41523 14253 12453 21435 21345 12435 12345



London Pleasure on five Bells.

In this Peal called London Pleasure, are Six-score changes, which are all single. It being a confused Peal to ring, I shall say nothing more of it, but expose it to view, as in the following changes.

12345 21345 21354 12354 12534 21534 25134 25314 23514 23154 23145 23415 23451 23541 25341 52341 52314 52134 51234 15234 15243 51243 52143 25143 21543 12543 12453 21453 24153 24513 25413 52413 52431 25431 24531 24351 24315 24135 21435 12435 14235 41235 41253 14253 14523 41523 45123 45213 42513 42153 42135 42315 42351 42531 45231 54231 54213 54123 51423 15423 ——- 15432 ——- 51432 54132 45132 41532 14532 14352 41352 43152 43512 45312 54312 54321 45321 43521 43251 43215 43125 41325 14325 13425 31425 31452 13452 13542 31542 35142 35412 34512 34152 34125 34215 34251 34521 35421 53421 53412 53142 51342 15342 15324 51324 53124 35124 31524 13524 13254 31254 32154 32514 35214 53214 53241 35241 32541 32451 32415 32145 31245 13245 ——- 12345



What you please. Doubles and Singles on 5 Bells.

Every bell leads four times, and lies behind twice, except when the extream is made behind, and twice in the seconds place, except when the extream is before; and note, when the treble is before the fourth stroke, the single is in second and third, the next time the single is behind; but at other times, the single is in third and fourths places. When any bell leaves leading, the double change is on the two first, and two last, and the extreams are made by turns, first behind, then before, and so on to the end, for there are six extreams.

12345 21354 21534 25143 25413 52431 52341 53214 53124 35142 35412 34521 34251 43215 43125 41352 41532 14523 14253 12435 ——- 12453 21435 21345 23154 23514 32541 32451 34215 34125 43152 43512 45321 45231 54213 54123 51432 51342 15324 15234 12543 ——- 15243 51234 51324 53142 53412 35421 35241 32514 32154 23145 23415 24351 24531 42513 42153 41235 41325 14352 14532 15423 ——- 15432 51423 51243 52134 52314 25341 25431 24513 24153 42135 42315 43251 43521 34512 34152 31425 31245 13254 13524 15342 ——- 13542 31524 31254 32145 32415 23451 23541 25314 25134 52143 52413 54231 54321 45312 45132 41523 41253 14235 14325 13452 ——- 13425 31452 31542 35124 35214 53241 53421 54312 54132 45123 45213 42531 42351 24315 24135 21453 21543 12534 12354 13245 ——- 12345



Reading Doubles. On five Bells.

In this Peal are Six-score changes, the treble is a Hunt; and note when treble is in thirds place hunting up, the two foremost bells dodge until it comes into the same place hunting downwards; and alwayes when the treble is going to lead, the four first bells makes the double change, if the third be behind; but if it be before, the double is on the two first and two last; every bell lieth twice behind, except when the treble goes to lead, if the third be before; and note, when it is 1, 3, 2, there is a single in second and thirds places, which is twice, once at the Three-score end, and Six-score end.

12345 21435 24153 42513 24531 42351 24315 42135 41253 14523 15432 51342 53124 35214 53241 35421 53412 35142 31524 13542 15324 51234 52143 25413 52431 25341 52314 25134 21543 12453 14235 41325 43152 34512 43521 34251 43215 34125 31452 13425 14352 41532 45123 54213 45231 54321 45312 54132 51423 15243 12534 21354 23145 32415 23451 32541 23514 32154 31245 13254 12354 21534 25143 52413 25431 52341 25314 52134 51243 15423 14532 41352 43125 34215 43251 34521 43512 34152 31425 13452 14325 41235 42153 24513 42531 24351 42315 24135 21453 12543 15234 51324 53142 35412 53421 35241 53214 35124 31542 13524 15342 51432 54123 45213 54231 45321 54312 45132 41523 14253 12435 21345 23154 32514 23541 32451 23415 32145 31254 13245 12345



Old Doubles. On five Bells.

This Peal call'd Old Doubles, is to be rang on five bells, wherein are Six-score changes, which are all Doubles, except only when the whole Hunt leads, and then there is always a single change made. It has a whole Hunt, a half Hunt, and three extream bells; every bell leads twice together all the way, and lies twice behind, except only when the whole Hunt leads, and then the bell behind lies there four times together, unless the extream is made behind, and then but twice. Every bell hunts in a perfect course, until the whole Hunt leads, and then the single is to be made, at which time the bell in seconds place lies there twice (unless the extream is made in second and thirds place) and every single change is made in third and fourths places, except the extreams which are (in this Peal) made by the same rule and after the same manner, as I shewed before in the Six-score call'd Doubles and Singles on five bells. In making the single changes in third and fourths places, it is observed, that the bell which lies in fourths place (the change next before the single) is hunting up; and in making the single change, it does dodge with the bell in thirds place, and so hunts up behind; and likewise the bell that lies in thirds place (in the change next before the single) is hunting down, and in making the single it does dodge with the bell in fourths place, and then hunts directly down.

In this following Peal, the treble is the whole Hunt, the second the half Hunt, and an extream change is alwayes made, when the half Hunt lies before the extream bells next to the whole Hunt; every extream is made between the two farthest extream bells from the half Hunt, as in the following changes.

12345 21435 24153 42513 45231 54321 53412 35142 31524 13254 13524 31254 32145 23415 24351 42531 45213 54123 51432 15342 15432 51342 53124 35214 32541 23451 24315 42135 41253 14523 14253 41523 45132 54312 53421 35241 32514 23154 21345 12435 12453 21543 25134 52314 53241 35421 34512 43152 41325 14235 14325 41235 42153 24513 25431 52341 53214 35124 31542 13452 13542 31452 34125 43215 42351 24531 25413 52143 51234 15324 15234 51324 53142 35412 34521 43251 42315 24135 21453 12543 12534 21354 23145 32415 34251 43521 45312 54132 51423 15243 15423 51243 52134 25314 23541 32451 34215 43125 41352 14532 14352 41532 45123 54213 52431 25341 23514 32154 31245 13425 13245 31425 34152 43512 45321 54231 52413 25143 21534 12354 12345

This Peal of Old Doubles, is grounded on the Twenty-four changes Doubles and Singles on four bells, which are made in a perfect course herein; every time the whole Hunt leads, there are two changes made in the Twenty-four; the half Hunt, and three extream bells, makes the Twenty-four changes, and every single change in this Peal, is a single change in the Twenty-four.

This Peal may be rang Six-score several wayes; with one whole Hunt, and half Hunt, it is to be rang six wayes (i.e.) three wayes in hunting up the whole Hunt at the beginning of the Peal, and the other wayes in hunting it down; in which six wayes, the Extream Changes are to be made by the same rule, and in the same manner, as those in the Six-score Doubles and Singles on five Bells, and Paradox before set down; so that with the twenty Hunts, it may be rang twenty times six wayes, which makes Six-score.

In these Six-score wayes, the whole Hunt is before the Bells when every single Change is made; but it may be rang Six-score several wayes more, by making the single Changes when the whole Hunt lies behind them, which being never practised, I will say no more of it.

For the convenience and benefit of the Practitioner, I have set down certain rules, shewing how to begin each Peal of Old Doubles (with any Hunt) by the former course (i.e.) in making the single Changes, when the whole Hunt lies before the Bells, these Rules serving only for moving the whole Hunt at the beginning of each Peal, for it may be hunted either up or down.

In hunting either the treble, third, or fifth Bells up, the first change is made between the four foremost Bells, thus.—

12345 21435

—The treble down, the first change is single in third and fourths places, unless the half Hunt lies so, as that the Extream is to be made.

—The third or fifth down, the first change is between the four hindmost Bells, thus.—

12345 13254

—The second or fourth up, the first change is between the four hindmost Bells.

—The second or fourth down, the first change between the four foremost Bells.

In ringing any of these Peals, where the first change is made between the four hindmost Bells, it must be made at the Back-stroke, otherwise the Bells will cut Compass all the way; every double change is made either between the four foremost, or four hindmost bells.



New Doubles. On five Bells.

In this Peal of New Doubles, there are Six-score Changes, which are all double, except only when the whole Hunt leads, and then there is alwayes a single Change made; it has a whole Hunt, a half Hunt, and three Extream Bells. The whole Hunt has a perfect course in hunting up and down, and lies twice before, and twice behind. When the whole Hunt leaves the thirds place hunting up, then each Bell that comes into that place, lies there twice, and then moves up behind; and the Bells in treble and seconds places, does continue dodging from the time that the whole Hunt hunts up out of thirds place, until it comes into that place again hunting down; and that Bell which comes into thirds place (when the whole Hunt leaves it hunting down, lies there twice, and then moves up behind) and the next Bell that comes into that place, lies there twice also, and then moves down before the Bells. But note, that Bell which lies in the thirds place (in the Change next before the Extream) continues there, until the whole Hunt hunts up into that place, and then it moves down; when the whole Hunt leads the Bell in seconds place, lies there twice together, and then moves down before the Bells; and every Bell that comes behind, lies there twice, except only in the Change next before, and that next after the whole Hunt leads; every single Change is made in third and fourths places, except the Extreams, which are also single Changes, and made between the two hindmost Bells, when the half Hunt lies before the Extream Bells next to the whole Hunt.

These directions are only for Ringing this Peal next following; but it may be Rang many other wayes, by making the Extream Changes in other places, of which I shall speak more anon.

12345 21354 23145 32415 23451 32541 23514 32154 31245 13254 13524 31542 35124 53214 35241 53421 35412 53142 51324 15342 15432 51423 54132 45312 54321 45231 54213 45123 41532 14523 14253 41235 42153 24513 42531 24351 42315 24135 21453 12435 ——- 12453 21435 24153 42513 24531 42351 24315 42135 41253 14235 14325 41352 43125 34215 43251 34521 43512 34152 31425 13452 13542 31524 35142 53412 35421 53241 35214 53124 51342 15324 15234 51243 52134 25314 52341 25431 52413 25143 21534 12543 ——- 12534 21543 25134 52314 25341 52431 25413 52143 51234 15243 15423 51432 54123 45213 54231 45321 54312 45132 41523 14532 14352 41325 43152 34512 43521 34251 43215 34125 31452 13425 13245 31254 32145 23415 32451 23541 32514 23154 21345 12354 ——- 12345

This Peal may be Rang Six-score several wayes. With one whole Hunt, and half Hunt, it may be Rang six wayes; in three of which, the whole Hunt is to be hunted up, and in the other three wayes it is to be hunted down; which six wayes are to be Rang, by making the Extream changes by the same rules, and in the same manner, as in Doubles and Singles on five Bells, Old Doubles, and Paradox, before set down; so that with the twenty Hunts, it may be Rang twenty times six wayes; which makes Six-score.

This Peal is grounded on the Twenty-four Changes, Doubles and Singles on four Bells, the half Hunt and three Extream Bells makes the Twenty-four Changes in perfect course; and in the same manner, as I shewed you in Paradox, and Old Doubles.

These following rules shews how to begin any Peal of New Doubles.

In hunting either the treble or fourth up, the first change must be double between the two first, and two last Bells, thus.—

12345 21354

In hunting the treble down, the first change is single in third and fourths places, unless the extream is to be made.

—The fourth down, the first change is between the four first Bells.

Second up, first change double between the four hindmost Bells.

Second down, the first change is double between the two first, and two last Bells.

Third up, first change double between the four foremost Bells.

Third down, first change double between the four hindmost Bells.

Fifth up, double between the four first Bells.

Fifth down, first change double, two first and two last Bells.



Grandsire on five Bells.

Grandsire is the best and most ingenious Peal that ever was composed, to be rang on five bells, it having no dependance on the course of any other Peal. There are Sixscore changes in it, in pricking of which, there is the greatest variety of any other Peal whatsoever; for it may be prick't or rang some thousands of wayes. The common way of ringing it, is to make the Bobs and single changes when the whole Hunt leads, which course and method I will first set down, and afterward say something of the other wayes in ringing it. It has a whole hunt and half hunt, the changes are all double except two, which are single. The whole hunt has a perfect course in hunting up and down, and lies twice together before, and twice behind all the way; every other bell has the same course as the whole hunt, in moving and hunting up and down; and each bell lead twice together all the way, and lie twice together behind, except only at the Bobs. Every Bob-change is made between the two first and two last bells, the bell in thirds place lies full when every Bob-change is made, and then moves down; and every other double change is made between the four bells that stand together (viz.) either the four first, or four last bells. There are two sorts of Bobs, one of which is call'd a single Bob, and the other a double. The Rule for making the single Bob is this—When the whole hunt leads, and the half hunt lies in thirds place, the next is a Bob-change; in making of which, the whole hunt moves out of the trebles place up into the seconds place hunting up, and the bell which lies behind in the change next before the Bob, makes a dodge with the bell in fourths place, and then lies twice behind; and that bell which did dodge with the bell in tenors place, moves directly down; this is a single Bob, that is, one Bob-change. The Rule for making the double Bob is this—When the whole hunt lies in the seconds place hunting down, and the half hunt behind, then there is a double Bob, that is, two Bob-changes, one of which is made the next change wherein the whole Hunt moves out of the seconds place down before the bells, and the other bob is made the next change but one to it, in which the whole Hunt moves from before the bells up into the seconds place; the bell which lies in the thirds place when every Bob-change is made, lies there twice, and then moves down. And at every double Bob, the two hindmost bells continue dodging until the whole Hunt moves up into the seconds place, and parts them. Every time the whole Hunt comes before the bells, there is either a single Bob, or double Bob made, which comes by turns, one single, and the next double throughout the Peal.

The greatest variety of this Peal consists in making the single changes. In this way of Ringing it (with any whole Hunt and half Hunt) the first single change may be made either at the first, second, third, fourth, fifth, or sixth Bobs, at the single or double Bobs at pleasure; observing for a constant Rule, that the half Hunt is alwayes one of the two bells which makes every single change; for the single changes are so contrived, that (in making them) the whole Hunt and half Hunt are to continue their constant course as at other times. At the single Bob, the single change is made in seconds and thirds places; and at the double Bob, 'tis made in fourth and fifths places, the other three bells lying still in their places, whil'st each single change is made; the next change to each single, is a Bob-change; every single change is made when the whole hunt lies before the bells; there being alwayes sixty changes, from the first single change to the second; if the first single change is made at a single bob, then the second single change must be made at the third single bob from it; or if the first single change is made at a double bob, the second single change must be made at the third double bob from that where the first was made.

This Peal may be rang without making any single change therein, which is done by making a double change to supply the place of it. There are two of these double changes in each Peal; the first of them may be made at any bob within sixty changes from the beginning of the Peal, and the second is to be made just sixty changes from the first. At a double bob, it may be made at either of the two bob-changes; at the first of them, 'tis made by moving the whole Hunt down, and the bell in thirds place up over two bells at once into the tenors place, thus:—

41325 14253

In making it at the second bob change of the double bob, 'tis the same as at the first, only in that the whole Hunt moved down to lead; but in this it must move up from before the bells into the seconds place, as in this change:—

12435 21354

The changes next following these, are the same as at other times. At the single bob, 'tis to be made when the whole Hunt lies in the seconds place hunting down; in which place it may be made two wayes, in one of which the bell in thirds place is to be moved up behind, in the same manner as I showed you at the double bob: The other way, is to move the bell in tenors place down into the thirds place, thus:—

51423 15342

Now the reason wherefore at this place it may be made two wayes, and at each of the double bob changes but one way, is this; At the double bob, the half Hunt lies behind, which cannot be moved into thirds place, for that would put it out of its course; but in the single bob, the half Hunt lying before the bells, and the whole Hunt in seconds place, so that neither of those bells are concerned therein; therefore it may be made either by moving the bell in thirds place up behind, or else by moving the hindmost bell down into thirds place, both which are to one effect, though different changes; for these changes are so continued, that (in making them) the whole Hunt and half Hunt are to continue their constant course, as at other times.

1  2     Next Part
Home - Random Browse