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Desserts and Salads
by Gesine Lemcke
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DESSERTS AND SALADS

BY

GESINE LEMCKE

AUTHOR OF THE EUROPEAN AND AMERICAN CUISINE, AND CHAFING-DISH RECIPES PRINCIPAL AND OWNER OF THE BROOKLYN AND NEW YORK COOKING COLLEGES

"Eating is a Necessity, But Cooking is an Art."

NEW YORK AND LONDON

D. APPLETON AND COMPANY

1920



Copyright, 1892, 1896, 1918 By GESINE LEMCKE.

Printed in the United States of America



PREFACE.

I ask every one who may become possessed of this book to read the recipes herein contained carefully and thoughtfully before attempting the making of any of them, and also to observe the following instructions:

Weigh and measure all ingredients exactly, and have everything ready to mix before you commence.

If you measure your ingredients by means of a cup be sure you use one which holds half a pint.

Use neither more nor less of anything than the recipe instructs you, and be sure to have your fire just right, as also instructed by the recipe.

If at first success does not come to you do not despair, but persist in following the advice of the old adage: "Try, try again."

You should always bear in mind that honest work is never lost and that reward must come in the end.



Desserts and Salads.

SAUCES.

1. Wine Chaudeau.— Into a lined saucepan put 1/2 bottle Rhine wine, 4 tablespoonfuls sugar, 1 teaspoonful cornstarch, the peel of 1/2 lemon and the yolks of 6 eggs; place the saucepan over a medium hot fire and beat the contents with an egg beater until just at boiling point; then instantly remove from the fire, beat a minute longer, pour into a sauce bowl and serve with boiled or baked pudding.

2. White Wine Sauce.— Over the fire place a saucepan containing 2 cups white wine, 4 tablespoonfuls sugar, 3 whole eggs, the yolks of 4 eggs and the peel and juice of 1 lemon; beat the contents of saucepan with an egg beater until nearly boiling; then instantly remove and serve.

3. Wine Cream Sauce.— 1/2 bottle white wine, 1/2 teaspoonful cornstarch, 3 eggs (yolks and whites beaten separately), 4 tablespoonfuls sugar and the peel and juice of 1/2 lemon; put all the ingredients except the whites of eggs in saucepan; beat with an egg beater until just about to boil; then remove from fire; have the whites beaten to a stiff froth; add them to the sauce, beat for a minute longer and then serve.

4. Claret Sauce.— Over the fire place a lined saucepan containing 1/2 bottle claret, 3 or 4 tablespoonfuls sugar, 1 lemon cut into slices and freed of the pits, a piece of cinnamon and 1 small tablespoonful cornstarch mixed with water or wine; stir constantly until it comes to a boil; then strain and serve. Or boil 1 tablespoonful cornstarch in 1-1/2 cups water, with piece of cinnamon and a few slices of lemon, for a few minutes; then remove from the fire; add 1/2 pint claret and sugar to taste.

5. Bishop Sauce.— Boil 2 ounces of sago in 2 cups water, with 1 tablespoonful fine minced or ground bitter almonds, a piece of cinnamon and the peel of 1 lemon; when sago is done strain it through a sieve, add 1-1/2 cups claret, 1/4 pound sugar and 1 teaspoonful of bishop essence.

6. Madeira Sauce, No. 1.— Set a small saucepan on the stove with the yolks of 3 eggs, 1 cup Madeira and 2 tablespoonfuls sugar; stir until it comes to a boil; then remove from fire and add by degrees 4 tablespoonfuls sweet cream, stirring constantly, and serve.

7. Madeira Sauce, No. 2.— Mix 1 tablespoonful flour with 1-1/2 spoonfuls butter; add 1-1/2 cups boiling water; boil 3 minutes, stirring constantly; remove from the fire, add 1/2 cup Madeira and 3 tablespoonfuls sugar.

8. Butter Sauce.— In a small saucepan mix 1 tablespoonful flour with a little cold water; add by degrees 1 cup of boiling water, stirring constantly; set the saucepan over the fire, add 1 heaping tablespoonful butter in small pieces; continue stirring and boil for a few minutes.

9. Sherry Wine Sauce, No. 1.— Add to the Butter Sauce 1/2 cup sugar and 1/2 pint sherry wine.

10. Sherry Wine Sauce, No. 2.— 1 cup sherry wine, 1/2 cup water, the yolks of 3 eggs, 2 tablespoonfuls sugar and the grated rind of 1/2 lemon; put all the ingredients in a small saucepan over the fire and keep stirring until the sauce begins to thicken; then take it off; if allowed to boil it will be spoiled, as it will immediately curdle; beat the whites to a stiff froth, stir them into the sauce and serve.

11. Sherry Wine Sauce, No. 3.— Melt in a small saucepan 1 tablespoonful butter; add 1 teaspoonful flour; when well mixed add 1 cup sherry wine, 2 tablespoonfuls sugar and the yolks of 4 eggs; stir briskly until the sauce is on the point of boiling; then instantly remove and serve with plum or bread pudding.

12. Wine or Brandy Sauce.— Prepare 1 cup Butter Sauce, sweeten it with sugar, add 1 glass brandy, port or sherry wine, a little lemon juice and nutmeg.

13. Arrack Sauce (Allemande).— Mix 2 tablespoonfuls flour with some white wine; add in small pieces 2 tablespoonfuls butter, peel and juice of 1/2 lemon and 2 cups white wine; place a saucepan containing the ingredients over the fire and stir until it comes to a boil; remove from the fire, add 1 cup arrack and 1 cup sugar.

14. Arrack Sauce (English).— Put in a small saucepan 1 tablespoonful flour mixed with a little cold water, the yolks of 3 eggs, 1 tablespoonful butter, a piece of cinnamon, a little lemon peel, 2 tablespoonfuls sugar and 1-1/2 cups water; set saucepan over the fire, stir constantly until it commences to boil; then instantly remove from the stove, add a little lemon juice and 1/2 cup arrack. This sauce can be made with any kind of wine or brandy.

15. Brandy Sauce (with Milk, "English Style").— Put in a small saucepan 1 cup milk, the yolks of 2 eggs, 1 tablespoonful sugar and a little grated lemon peel; stir over the fire till the sauce is at boiling point; instantly remove and add 3 tablespoonfuls brandy; serve with plum pudding.

16. Brandy Sauce (American), No. 1.— Stir 4 tablespoonfuls powdered sugar with 1-1/2 spoonfuls butter to a cream; add by degrees the yolks of 2 eggs, 1/2 cup boiling water and 1/2 cup brandy; put all the ingredients in a tin cup and set it in a saucepan of hot water; stir until the sauce is boiling hot; flavor with nutmeg and vanilla. This sauce may be made of wine in the same manner.

17. Brandy Sauce, No. 2.— Beat 1 tablespoonful butter with 6 tablespoonfuls powdered sugar to a cream; add by degrees 1 wine-glassful of brandy, 3 tablespoonfuls boiling water and a little nutmeg; put the sauce into a tin cup, set in saucepan of boiling water and stir until the sauce is hot; but do not allow it to boil.

18. Punch Sauce.— Place a small vessel on the stove with 1 cup of rum, 2 tablespoonfuls powdered sugar, the grated rind of 1/2 an orange and 1 teaspoonful vanilla essence; let it remain over the fire until the liquor catches a light flame; put on the lid for 1 minute; then remove it from the fire, add the juice of 1 orange and serve hot. This sauce is usually poured over the pudding.

19. Rum Sauce.— Mix 1/2 tablespoonful flour with a piece of butter the size of an egg; add 1 cup boiling water; when well mixed together add 1/2 cup Rhine wine, the peel and juice of 1/2 lemon, 4 tablespoonfuls sugar, a piece of cinnamon and the yolks of 3 eggs; place in a saucepan over the fire and beat with an egg beater till the sauce comes to a boil; instantly remove and add 1/2 cup rum. In place of rum, brandy may be used. NOTE.—The eggs may be omitted and 1 tablespoonful flour used instead of 1/2.

20. Sauce a la Diaz.— Place a tin pan over the fire with 1 cup rum, 1/2 cup Marella wine, 3 tablespoonfuls sugar, the grated rind of 1 orange and 1 teaspoonful vanilla; leave the pan on the stove until the liquor takes fire; then cover quickly; boil 1 minute; draw it from the fire to the side of the stove; let it stand a few minutes; then strain into a bowl; cover tightly and when cold pour it over the pudding.

21. Wine Chaudeau (with Rum).— Place a saucepan on the stove with 1 teaspoonful cornstarch mixed with a little cold water; add 2 whole eggs, the yolks of 2 eggs, 4 tablespoonfuls sugar, a little lemon juice, some grated orange peel, 1/2 bottle Rhine wine and 2 glasses of rum; stir with an egg beater until just about to boil; then instantly remove from the fire, stir for a few minutes longer and serve. Any other kind of liquor may be used instead of rum.

22. Wine Sauce (with Almonds and Raisins).— Put a small vessel over the fire with 1/2 bottle claret, 3 tablespoonfuls ground almonds, 3 tablespoonfuls raisins, a piece of cinnamon, 4 tablespoonfuls sugar and the peel of 1 lemon; stir until it boils; then remove from the fire, take out cinnamon and lemon peel and serve.

23. Hard Sauce.— Stir 1/4 pound butter with 8 tablespoonfuls powdered sugar to a cream until it looks white; add by degrees 1 small glass of brandy (and, if liked, a little nutmeg); the yolks of 2 eggs may also be beaten through the sauce.

24. Hard Sauce (with Cherries).— Make a hard sauce with the yolks of 2 eggs and put some nice, ripe cherries (without the pits) into it; stir the whole well together and serve with suet pudding or dumplings. Blackberries, peaches or plums may be used instead of cherries.

25. Strawberry Sauce.— Boil in a saucepan 2 teaspoonfuls cornstarch in 1-1/2 cups water with the rind of 1 lemon; take it from the fire, add 1 cup strawberry juice, a little Rhine wine or claret and sweeten with sugar.

26. Sauce of Apricots.— Boil 3 tablespoonfuls apricot marmalade with 1 tablespoonful butter and 1/2 cup water 5 minutes; add 2 tablespoonfuls brandy and serve with boiled suet, batter pudding or apple dumplings.

27. Sauce of Cherries, No. 1.— Place in a saucepan 1 cup sugar, 1 cup water and 1/2 cup claret; when this boils add 1 pint of ripe cherries (without the pits); boil them 10 minutes; then take out the cherries and mix 1 teaspoonful cornstarch with a little water; add it to the sauce, boil a minute, strain and put cherries back into the sauce; serve cold.

28. Sauce of Cherries, No. 2.— Remove the pits from 1/2 pound ripe cherries; put the stones into a mortar and pound them fine; put them, with the cherries, 1 pint water and a piece of cinnamon, in a saucepan; add 3/4 cup sugar and boil slowly 1/2 hour; strain and thicken the sauce with 2 teaspoonfuls cornstarch; boil a minute, add 1/2 cup claret and serve.

29. Strawberry Hard Sauce.— Stir 2 tablespoonfuls butter to a cream with 1 cup powdered sugar; add the yolks of 2 eggs; beat until very light and stir 1 cup nice, ripe strawberries through it; put the sauce in a glass dish, cover with the beaten whites of 2 eggs and put some nice strawberries on top of the sauce. Any other kind of fruit may be used instead of strawberries. Or stir 1/2 cup butter with 1 cup powdered sugar to a cream; add the beaten white of 1 egg and 1 cup thoroughly mashed strawberries.

30. Raspberry Sauce, No. 1.— Put in a small saucepan the peel of 1 lemon, a little piece of cinnamon, 1 cup water and 1 spoonful sugar; boil 5 minutes; mix 2 teaspoonfuls cornstarch with some cold water; add it to the contents of saucepan; boil a minute; add 1 cup raspberry juice or syrup and serve either hot or cold.

31. Raspberry Sauce, No. 2.— Set a saucepan on the stove with 1-1/2 cups raspberry juice, 1/2 cup water, the juice and peel of 1 lemon, sugar to taste, 1 teaspoonful cornstarch and the yolks of 3 eggs; beat constantly with an egg beater until it comes to a boil; quickly remove it from the fire; beat for a few minutes longer; beat the whites of the 3 eggs to a stiff froth and stir them into the sauce.

32. Huckleberry Sauce.— Put the huckleberries with a little water in a saucepan over the fire; boil slowly for 1/2 hour; then strain through a sieve, sweeten with sugar and thicken with a little cornstarch; add a few tablespoonfuls port wine or a little lemon juice and claret; serve cold.

33. Sauce of Dried Cherries.— Wash 1 pound dried cherries; put them into a mortar and pound fine; place them in a saucepan with 3 or 4 cups water over the fire; add a few zwiebacks, a piece of cinnamon and boil 1 hour; strain through a sieve, add a little claret and lemon juice and sweeten with sugar.

34. Nut Sauce.— Stir 1 tablespoonful butter with 5 tablespoonfuls powdered sugar to a cream; add the yolks of 2 eggs and a few spoonfuls of water; put it in a tin pail; set in a vessel of hot water; stir until hot; remove the sauce from the fire, add 1/2 cup fine, minced almonds and flavor with vanilla. Fine, chopped, stoned raisins may be used instead of almonds.

35. Hard Sauce (with Nuts).— Prepare a hard sauce of 1 tablespoonful butter and 5 tablespoonfuls powdered sugar; beat this until white; add by degrees the yolks of 2 eggs; beat the whites of 2 eggs to a stiff froth; add the sauce gradually to the whites; beat constantly with an egg beater; and lastly add 1 cup pounded or ground nuts, almonds, walnuts, hazel or hickory nuts. The nuts may be finely chopped if more convenient. This sauce may be prepared in the same manner with peaches, apricots (peeled and cut into pieces) or preserved pineapple.

36. Strawberry Custard Sauce.— Place a small saucepan on the stove with 1 pint milk, the yolks of 2 eggs and 2 tablespoonfuls sugar; stir constantly until it comes to a boil; instantly remove from the fire, flavor with vanilla and set it away to cool; then stir 1 cup strawberries into it; beat the whites of the 2 eggs to a stiff froth and put it on top of the sauce. This sauce is excellent with strawberry shortcake. NOTE.—Any kind of fruit may be substituted for strawberries.

37. Fruit Sauce (not boiled).— Stir 1 cup raspberry juice and 1 of currants with 8 tablespoonfuls sugar for 20 minutes; serve with cold puddings. Or boil 2 teaspoonfuls cornstarch in water for a few minutes; sweeten with sugar; thin it with raspberry, currant or cherry juice; add a little Rhine wine and serve with cold pudding. This sauce is exceedingly nice when made of strawberries with the addition of the juice of 1 orange and a little grated skin.

38. Peach Sauce, No. 1.— To be served cold. Pare and cut in halves 1/2 dozen peaches; stew them in sugar syrup; press them through a sieve; thicken them with a little arrowroot or cornstarch; boil a minute, add a little white wine and serve. Or boil the peaches (after they are peeled and free from the stones) in sugar syrup until tender; then take them out, put in a dish, cut each half into 4 pieces and pour the liquor over them; then serve with tapioca pudding.

39. Peach Sauce, No. 2.— Beat 1 tablespoonful butter with 4 tablespoonfuls powdered sugar to a cream; add the yolks of 2 eggs; beat until very light and creamy; then beat the whites of the 2 eggs to a stiff froth; add the sauce to them by degrees; keep on beating with an egg beater until all is well mixed together and stir 1 cup of fine, cut peaches through it; serve with boiled pudding.

40. Sauce of Currants and Raspberries.— Wash 1/2 pound red currants and raspberries; sprinkle with sugar and let them stand 1/2 hour; prepare a sauce the same as for Peach Sauce and stir the fruit through it.

41. Cream Sauce (with Jelly), No. 1.— Stir 1 cup currant jelly until smooth; add 1 cup rich, sweet cream and beat with an egg beater to a froth; add a little arrack rum or Cognac and serve with cold pudding.

42. Cream Sauce (with Jelly), No. 2.— Beat 1/2 cup fruit jelly and the whites of 2 eggs to a stiff froth and serve with cold pudding.

43. Lemon Sauce, No. 1.— Stir 1 tablespoonful butter with 4 tablespoonfuls powdered sugar to a cream; add by degrees 1 beaten egg, the juice and grated rind of 1/2 lemon, a little nutmeg and 4 tablespoonfuls boiling water; beat the sauce thoroughly for 5 minutes; put in a tin pail and set in saucepan of hot water; stir constantly until very hot, but do not allow it to boil.

44. Lemon Custard Sauce.— Place a saucepan with 1 pint milk, 3 whole eggs and 3 tablespoonfuls sugar over the fire and stir until it just comes to the boiling point; quickly remove, pour sauce into a dish, flavor with lemon essence and serve cold with cold pudding.

45. Lemon Sauce (with Liquor).— Melt in a saucepan 1 tablespoonful butter; add 1/2 tablespoonful flour; when well mixed pour in 1 cup boiling water; boil 2 minutes; remove from the fire, pour sauce into a bowl; add the juice of 1/2 lemon, a little nutmeg and a glass of brandy; sweeten with sugar and serve hot. Very nice with rolly-poly pudding or apple dumplings. Sherry or Madeira wine may be used instead of brandy.

46. Sauce a l'Orange.— Stir the yolks of 4 eggs with 2 tablespoonfuls powdered sugar to a cream; add by degrees 1 cup sweet cream and stir constantly; add the grated rind of 1 orange; put the whole in a tin cup or pail, set in a vessel of hot water and stir all the time until it is on the point of boiling; then instantly remove from the fire, strain through a sieve over the pudding and serve hot.

47. Sauce au Kirsch.— Boil 1 teaspoonful cornstarch in 1 cup water; sweeten with 2 tablespoonfuls sugar; add 2 tablespoonfuls kirsch and serve.

48. Lemon Sauce, No. 2.— Mix 2 teaspoonfuls flour with a little cold water; put it in a saucepan; add 1 pint boiling water, 1 tablespoonful butter and 1/2 cup sugar; stir until the sauce boils; then remove from the fire, add the juice of 1 lemon and a little of the grated rind and nutmeg.

49. Lemon Cream Sauce.— Put in a tin pail or cup 1-1/2 cups milk, the yolks of 2 eggs and 2 tablespoonfuls sugar; set in a vessel of hot water; beat with an egg beater until the sauce comes to a boil; remove from the fire; add 1/2 teaspoonful lemon essence; beat the whites to a stiff froth and stir them into the sauce.

50. Almond Sauce.— Remove the brown skin of 2 ounces of almonds, ground or chopped fine; put them in a saucepan with 2 cups milk, 2 tablespoonfuls sugar, the yolks of 3 eggs and 1 teaspoonful of arrowroot; put the saucepan in a vessel of hot water; keep stirring until the sauce comes to a boil. Instead of almonds almond essence may be used; a little brandy may also be added if liked.

51. Chocolate Sauce.— Boil 1/4 pound grated chocolate with 1 cup water and 3 tablespoonfuls sugar for 5 minutes; beat up the yolks of 3 eggs with 1-1/2 cups cold milk; add it to the chocolate; keep stirring until the sauce comes to a boil; instantly take it from the fire, beat for a few minutes longer and pour it into a sauce bowl; serve cold with cold pudding.

52. Chocolate Cream Sauce.— Boil 1/4 pound grated chocolate with 1 cup water for 5 minutes; add sugar to taste; beat up the yolks of 3 eggs with 1-1/2 cups sweet cream; add it to the chocolate; keep stirring until nearly boiling; remove from fire, add some vanilla essence and the beaten whites of the 3 eggs.

53. Vanilla Cream Sauce.— Put in a saucepan 2 cups sweet cream, 2 or 3 tablespoonfuls sugar, 2 whole eggs and the yolks of 2 eggs; set the saucepan in a vessel of hot water; beat with an egg beater till the sauce just comes to the boiling point; then instantly remove from the fire; do not allow the sauce to boil; flavor with vanilla extract and serve cold.

54. Vanilla Sauce.— Put in a tin cup or pail 2 cups milk and 1 teaspoonful cornstarch; add the yolks of 3 eggs and 2 tablespoonfuls sugar; place the cup in a vessel of hot water; beat with an egg beater until it comes to a boil; instantly remove; pour the sauce into a sauciere; flavor with 1 teaspoonful vanilla and serve cold. Do not allow the sauce to boil or it will curdle.

55. Sauce a la Cream (sweet).— Put in a tin pail 2 cups milk, the yolks of 2 eggs, 2 tablespoonfuls sugar and 1 teaspoonful cornstarch; set in a vessel of hot water; stir constantly until it comes to a boil; instantly remove; flavor with vanilla; beat the whites of the eggs to a stiff froth; pour the sauce into a glass dish, spread the beaten whites over it and dust some powdered sugar over all.

56. White Sauce.— Boil 2 teaspoonfuls arrowroot in 1 pint milk; add 2 tablespoonfuls sugar and 1 teaspoonful lemon essence; beat the white of 1 egg to a froth and stir it through the sauce when cold.

57. Cream Sauce (plain).— Stir 1/2 tablespoonful butter with 4 tablespoonfuls powdered sugar to a cream; boil 1 tablespoonful flour in 1 cup of water; pour it slowly into the creamed butter; keep on beating until the whole is well mixed; flavor with 1 teaspoonful lemon essence and serve hot.

58. Vanilla Sauce (plain).— Put in a saucepan 1 pint milk, 1-1/2 teaspoonfuls cornstarch, sugar to taste and stir over the fire until it boils; flavor with 1 teaspoonful vanilla essence and serve when cold.

59. Vanilla Sauce (with Cognac).— Stir 2 tablespoonfuls butter with 6 tablespoonfuls powdered sugar to a cream; add by degrees 3 tablespoonfuls Cognac, sherry or Madeira wine and 1/2 cup boiling water; keep beating all the time; put this in a tin pail and set in a vessel of hot water; keep stirring until hot, but do not allow it to boil; remove from the fire and add 2 teaspoonfuls vanilla essence.

60. Caramel Sauce.— Put 2 tablespoonfuls sugar in a saucepan over the fire; let it get light brown; add a little water; boil for a minute or two; then pour it into a small saucepan; add 1-1/2 cups of milk or cream and the yolks of 2 eggs; set the saucepan in a vessel of hot water; stir until it comes to a boil; remove from the fire and flavor with 1 teaspoonful vanilla.

61. Coffee Cream Sauce.— Pour 2 cups boiling hot cream over 2 tablespoonfuls freshly ground coffee; cover tightly and let it stand 10 minutes; then strain the cream through a fine sieve; put the cream in a small saucepan; add the yolks of 2 eggs, 1 teaspoonful cornstarch and 2 tablespoonfuls sugar; put this over a moderate fire and stir until it comes to a boil; remove from the stove, pour it into a sauce bowl and stir the beaten whites of the eggs through it; serve cold.

62. Nutmeg Sauce.— Mix 1 tablespoonful butter with 1 tablespoonful flour; add 2 cups boiling water and boil 5 minutes; sweeten with sugar and flavor with grated nutmeg.

63. Orange Cream Sauce.— Stir the yolks of 4 eggs with 1-1/2 tablespoonfuls sugar to a cream; add 1 teaspoonful butter, a little grated orange peel and 1/2 pint sweet cream or milk; put the ingredients in a small saucepan over the fire and stir till boiling hot; when cold mix it with a few spoonfuls whipped cream. Lemon Sauce is made in the same manner. This sauce may also be flavored with vanilla or lemon extract.

64. Sabayon Sauce.— Put the yolks of 4 eggs and 1 whole egg in a lined saucepan and beat them with an egg beater to a froth; add 4 tablespoonfuls sugar, a small piece of lemon peel, the juice of 1 lemon and 1/2 bottle of Rhine wine; 5 minutes before serving put the saucepan over the fire and beat constantly till boiling hot; but do not allow it to boil; serve at once. Sabayon of Madeira or Malaga wine without lemon juice is made the same way. If rum is added in place of wine it is then called Rum Sabayon Sauce.

65. Strawberry Chaudeau Sauce.— Put 1 cup strawberry juice or syrup in a saucepan; sweeten to taste; add 1/2 cup white wine and the yolks of 2 eggs; beat this over the fire with an egg beater till it foams and rises up; remove from the fire and mix it with the beaten whites of 2 eggs; serve with vanilla koch or souflee.

66. Pineapple Chaudeau Sauce.— Put 1 cup pineapple juice or syrup in a saucepan; sweeten to taste; add 1/2 cup white wine and the yolks of 2 eggs; beat this over the fire with an egg beater till it foams and rises up; remove from the fire and mix it with the beaten whites of 2 eggs; serve with vanilla koch or souflee.

67. Raspberry Chaudeau Sauce is made the same as Strawberry Chaudeau Sauce.

68. Cocoanut Snow Sauce.— Beat the whites of 3 eggs to a stiff froth and boil 1 cup sugar with 1/2 cup water till it forms a thread between 2 fingers; then gradually pour it into the beaten whites, stirring constantly; next add 1 cup freshly grated cocoanut.

69. Cocoanut Sauce (another way).— Stir 2 tablespoonfuls butter with 1 cup powdered sugar to a cream; add by degrees the yolks of 2 eggs; then beat the whites to a stiff froth; mix them with the sauce; add 3/4 cup freshly grated cocoanut and serve with boiled pudding.

70. Snow Sauce (with orange flavor).— Beat the whites of 2 eggs to a stiff froth; boil a small cup of sugar with 1/2 cup water till it forms a thread between two fingers; remove it from the fire; add the juice of 1 orange and gradually pour it while hot into the beaten whites, stirring constantly; add last a little grated rind of orange and serve. Snow Sauce with lemon flavor is made the same way.

71. Pistachio Sauce.— Stir the yolks of 4 eggs with 1 pint sweet cream and 2 tablespoonfuls sugar over the fire till nearly boiling; remove from fire; add 2 ounces finely pounded pistachio nuts; serve when ice cold with frozen pudding.

72. Cold Pineapple Sauce.— Pare and grate a small, ripe pineapple; press it through a sieve; add 1 cup sugar and a glass of Rhine wine; let it stand on ice for 1 hour and serve with frozen pudding.

SYRUPS.

73. Plain or Sugar Syrup.— Dissolve 4 pounds white sugar, 1 quart cold water and the beaten white of 1 egg; stir until sugar is dissolved; simmer for 3 minutes; skim well, strain through a fine flannel bag and bottle in well corked bottles.

74. Pineapple Syrup.— Pare and cut some large, ripe pineapples into small pieces; put them in a stone jar or large bowl; sprinkle a little sugar between and let the pineapples stand covered with a cloth in cellar for 36 hours, or until they have bubbles on top; then strain through a sieve or coarse bag, and if not clear enough strain again through a flannel bag; add to each pint of juice 1 pound of sugar; stir until the sugar is melted; then put it over the fire and simmer 3 minutes; skim and put the syrup in bottles; cork well and keep them in cool place. This syrup may be thinned with 2 parts plain syrup.

75. Strawberry Syrup.— Choose none but fine, ripe berries if you wish your syrup to be good; mash the strawberries in a stone jar or bowl; cover with a thin white cloth and let them stand 24 hours at a temperature of 70deg to 80deg F.; then inclose in a flannel bag and press them; add to each pint of juice 1 pound sugar; stir until the sugar is dissolved; then put it over the fire, let it boil up, skim well, remove from fire and bottle while hot.

75a. Raspberry Syrup is made the same as strawberry.

76. Raspberry and Currant Syrup.— Take equal quantities of raspberries and currants; free the latter from stems; put the fruit together into a stone jar or bowl, mash it up, cover with a cloth and let stand for 24 hours; then inclose the fruit in a coarse bag, press out the juice and to each pint add 1 pound sugar; let it boil up and bottle.

77. Raspberry Syrup (without fruit).— To make 8 gallons of syrup prepare a plain syrup of 18 pounds sugar with 5 gallons of water and put it in a clean mixing barrel; next dissolve 2 ounces tataric acid in 1 pint cold water and add it to the syrup; then pour 1 quart boiling water over 4 ounces powdered orrisroot; let it get cold; then filter; add it also to the syrup and stir up well. Color it with the following mixture: Take 1/2 pound mallow or malva flowers and soak them in 1/2 gallon water for 6 hours; then mash in a mortar 2 ounces cochineal and 2 ounces alum and pour over these 2 quarts boiling water, and when cold filter; next mix both colors together, add them to the syrup and stir for 15-20 minutes. This is an excellent recipe for imitation of raspberry syrup.

78. Raspberry Syrup (without boiling).— Mash some ripe berries in a stone jar or bowl and set the paste for 3 days (covered with a linen cloth) in a cool cellar; then press out the juice through a coarse bag; let it stand for 6 hours; drain off the clear juice and leave the sediment; add to 1 pint juice 1 pound sugar, stir for 1 hour and bottle; cork bottles loosely and set them for 4 days in the sun; then filter through a fine flannel bag; re-bottle the syrup in small bottles, cork well and cover corks with beeswax. Syrup made in this way is excellent for sauces. Strawberry and Currant Syrup without boiling is made in the same manner.

79. Blackberry Syrup.— Mash the blackberries in a stone jar, cover and let them stand for 48 hours; then strain them through a bag; add to each pint of juice 1 pound sugar; stir until dissolved; put it over the fire to boil 3 minutes; skim well; add to each quart of syrup 1/2 gill of French brandy and bottle. Or take nice, ripe berries, mash and strain them; add to each pint of juice 1 pound sugar, 1/2 teaspoonful ground cloves and the same of cinnamon and mace; boil 5 minutes; add to 1 gallon of syrup 1/2 pint brandy and bottle.

80. Peach Syrup.— Pare and cut the peaches into small pieces; put them in a preserving kettle with a little water; crack some of the peach stones, add them to the peaches and let boil slowly for 15 minutes; then strain through a flannel bag; add to 1 pint juice 1 pound sugar and boil a few minutes; skim well and bottle.

81. Apricot Syrup the same way. Or pare and cut the peaches into pieces, crack a few of the stones, add them to the fruit and let it stand 24 hours; then strain; allow for 1 pint juice 1 pound sugar; let it come to a boil; skim well and bottle.

82. Cherry Syrup.— Pound a sufficient quantity of ripe cherries (with the pits) in a porcelain or stone mortar; let it stand for 3 days; inclose them in a bag, press out the juice, add to each pint 1 pound sugar; let it boil up once, skim and put the syrup in bottles; cork and set away for use.

83. Wild Cherry Syrup is made in the same manner as the above.

84. Wild Cherry Bark Syrup.— Pour 1 pint cold water over 4 ounces well bruised wild cherry bark; let it stand for 36 hours; press out and let the liquid stand till clear; add 1-1/2 pounds white sugar; stir until dissolved and strain through fine flannel bag; set away in well corked bottles.

85. Vanilla Syrup.— Add 1/2 ounce fluid extract of vanilla to 1 gallon plain syrup. Another recipe: Rub 1/2 ounce citric acid with a little plain syrup; add 1 fluid ounce extract of vanilla and 1 gallon plain syrup.

86. Vanilla Cream Syrup.— Add to 3 pints plain syrup 1 ounce extract of vanilla, 1 quart rich, sweet cream or condensed milk.

87. Cream Syrup.— 1 cup sweet cream, 1 cup milk and 1 pound sugar are well mixed together, and if it is to be kept for several days add a little bicarbonate of sodium.

88. Lemon Syrup.— Grate the rind of 16 large, fresh lemons over 8 pounds granulated sugar; add 2 quarts cold water and the juice of the lemons; stir until the sugar is melted; then strain through a fine flannel bag and put the syrup in well corked pint bottles. Be careful to grate off only the yellow part of the rind of the lemons; the white part will give the syrup a bitter taste. There is no better lemon syrup made than this. 2 to 3 tablespoonfuls of this syrup in a glass of cold water makes fine lemonade and is also excellent for mineral waters and sauces.

89. Lemon Syrup (with Oil of Lemon).— Add to 1 gallon plain syrup 25 drops oil of lemon and 10 drams citric acid; mix the oil and acid together gradually; then add the syrup slowly, and when well mixed bottle syrup and keep in a cool place for use.

90. Another Recipe:—Add to 1 gallon plain syrup 6 drams tartaric acid dissolved in a little warm water, 1 ounce gumarabic dissolved in 1 ounce warm water and 1/2 dram of the best lemon oil, or a sufficient quantity of lemon extract to flavor the syrup.

91. Lemon Syrup (plain).— Make of 8 pounds sugar and 2 quarts water a plain syrup; when nearly cold add 1 quart pure lemon juice; filter through a Canton flannel filter and bottle.

92. Orange Syrup.— Grate the rind of 12 oranges over 7 pounds granulated sugar; squeeze out the juice, strain and pour it over the sugar; add 1/2 gallon cold water; stir until sugar is dissolved; then strain through a fine flannel bag and bottle. Care should be taken to grate only the yellow part of the rind of the oranges, as the least particle of white will make the syrup bitter.

93. Orange Flower Syrup.— Add to 1 pint orange flower water 1-3/4 pounds sugar; stir until the sugar is dissolved; then bottle.



EXTRACTS AND ESSENCES.

94. Essence of Lemon.— Grate the rind of 12 lemons; put this in a bottle with 1 pint alcohol and 1 teaspoonful lemon oil; cork bottle tightly; set in a warm place; shake every day and after 2 weeks it will be ready for use.

95. Essence of Vanilla.— Take 1 ounce vanilla beans; split each bean in two (lengthwise); then cut into small pieces; put these into a large bottle with 1 pint alcohol and 1 pint water; cork the bottle, not too tightly; set in a warm place for 3 weeks and shake it once every day; it will them be ready for use.

96. Bischof Essence.— Pare off the peel of 12 green oranges; put them with 1 bottle of good rum in a glass jar that is used for preserving fruit; let it stand 24 hours; then pour the essence into small bottles and set in a cool place for further use; 2 tablespoonfuls to 1 bottle of claret are sufficient.

97. Essence of Oranges.— Pare off the peel of 8 yellow and 4 green oranges; put them in a large bottle or glass jar with 1 quart arrack; set in a warm place for 2 weeks; then strain through filtering paper, put into small bottles and set them in a cool place for further use; 2 tablespoonfuls essence are sufficient for 1 bottle wine.

98. Peach Essence.— Dissolve 1 fluid dram oil of bitter almonds in 7 pints rectified spirits of 90 per cent.; allow the solution to stand for a few days and then filter it; put away in well corked bottles.

99. Bitter Almond Essence.— Dissolve 1 fluid dram oil of bitter almonds in 3 quarts rectified spirits of 90 per cent. and store the fluid for some time before using it.

100. Coffee Essence.— Pour 3 pints rectified spirits of 90 per cent. over 5-1/4 ounces finely roasted and ground coffee; let it stand for several days, draw off the fluid and filter.

101. Cherry Essence.— Press out the flesh of ripe cherries; let the mass stand quietly in a moderately warm room until the pure juice has separated from the pulp; then place the mass in a bag, press the juice out, let it stand for a few hours longer and add an equal quantity of rectified spirits of 90 per cent.

102. Strawberry Essence.— Bruise 4-1/2 pounds wild strawberries; pour 3 quarts spirits of 90 per cent, over the mass; let it stand for some time and filter. The product will be about 1 gallon of strawberry essence.

103. Raspberry Essence.— Crush 2 pounds ripe raspberries; press them out and add 2 quarts rectified spirits of 90 per cent.

104. Rose Essence.— Dissolve 2 fluid drams rose oil in 1-1/3 quarts rectified spirits of 90 per cent. and filter the solution.

105. Orange Blossom Extract.— Pour 1-1/4 pints boiling milk over 10-1/2 ounces fresh orange blossoms; place same over the fire and let it boil up; then add 3 quarts rectified spirits of 90 per cent.; mix it thoroughly, add 2-1/2 pints champagne and filter.

106. Orange Peel Extract.— Crush in a stone mortar the rind of 12 oranges with some sugar; place the mass into a glass jar; add 1/3 gallon of rectified spirits of 90 per cent.; let it stand for 4 days; then decant the clear liquid and filter it; put away in well corked bottles.

107. Italian Meringue.— Whites of 5 eggs beaten to a stiff froth, 1 pound sugar, 1 teaspoonful vanilla extract, 3/4 cup water; put sugar and water over the fire in a saucepan (one of agateware is best); stir until sugar is dissolved; next put saucepan over the fire and boil till the sugar begins to foam; then take some of the boiling sugar in a spoon and blow it; if it flows off the spoon in large bubbles it is ready to use; wipe the rim of saucepan clean with a damp cloth and remove the sugar from fire; let it cool for 2 minutes; then pour it slowly into the beaten whites, stirring constantly.

108. Meringue.— 1/2 pound powdered sugar and the whites of 5 eggs; carefully separate the whites from the yolks; put the whites in a deep kettle for 15 minutes on ice; then whip it with an egg beater to a stiff froth; mix in slowly the sugar and use at once. This meringue is used for ornamenting puddings and cakes.

109. Spinach Green (for coloring).— Wash a few handfuls spinach, press it out and pound in a mortar to a pulp; then press out the juice in a cloth; put the spinach liquid in a small saucepan; put it for a few minutes over the fire; as soon as the liquid curdles pour it on a fine sieve; let the water run off and the green which remains press through a fine sieve and put it in a well covered glass till wanted. Spinach green is used for coloring creams or puddings.

110. Sugar Color.— Place a saucepan with 1 pound sugar and 1/2 pint water over the fire and boil till the sugar is dark brown and nearly black; then add 1 pint boiling water; stir until all the sugar is well dissolved; boil it for a few minutes; then remove from fire and put it into a well corked bottle. This color is used for coloring soups, sauces and sometimes jellies.

111. Lemon Sugar.— Grate the rind of 12 lemons; mix the grated lemon peel with 1 pound powdered sugar; put into well closed jars and set in a cool place; is used for cake sauces and puddings instead of freshly grated lemon peel.

112. Vanilla Sugar.— Split the vanilla bean, lengthwise, in two; put some granulated sugar on a plate and scrape the seed out of the vanilla bean; mix it with the sugar and put away in a well closed jar.

113. Red Sugar.— Sift out all the fine part of 1/2 pound granulated sugar; put the sugar on a piece of thick brown paper, drop a few drops of cochineal over the sugar and rub it with the hands till the sugar becomes a red color.

114. Green Sugar is prepared in the same manner as the foregoing, but care must be taken to use only green vegetable coloring.



FRENCH CREAMS.

115. Creme Francaise a la Vanille.— Put 1 quart sweet cream with the yolks of 8 eggs into a saucepan; add 3/4 cup sugar and stir the whole over the fire with an egg beater till nearly boiling; remove from fire, add 2 teaspoonfuls essence of vanilla and 1-1/2 ounces clarified gelatine (see Gelatine); continue stirring until the cream has cooled off; then set a plain form with tube in center into cracked ice, pour in the cream, cover and let it remain for 2 hours. If the form is oiled with fine almond oil the cream will turn out without dipping the form into hot water; the oiling is best done with a fine brush; the form is then turned upside down, so that all superfluous oil has a chance to run out.

116. Creme Francaise au Chocolat.— Melt 1/4 pound grated chocolate in the oven; then put it with 1 quart cream, 3/4 cup sugar and the yolks of 8 eggs over the fire; stir until nearly boiling; remove it from fire, add 1 teaspoonful essence of vanilla and 1 ounce clarified gelatine and finish same as in foregoing recipe.

117. Creme Francaise aux Amandes.— 1 quart cream, 1/4 pound blanched and finely pounded almonds, the yolks of 8 eggs, 1/2 cup sugar and 1/2 vanilla bean; boil the cream and pour it over the pounded almonds; cover and let it stand till cold; then strain the cream through a sieve; place a saucepan with the cream, yolks, vanilla and sugar over the fire; stir with an egg beater till nearly boiling; remove it from the fire and finish the same as Creme Francaise a la Vanille.

118. Creme Francaise au Cafe.— Pour 1 quart boiling cream over 4 tablespoonfuls fresh, ground coffee; cover and let it stand for 5 minutes; then strain through a fine sieve of cloth; place a saucepan over the fire with the coffee cream, yolks of 8 eggs and 5 tablespoonfuls sugar and stir till nearly boiling; finish the same as Creme Francaise a la Vanille.

119. Creme Francaise au The.— Pour 1 quart boiling cream over 2 tablespoonfuls of the best black tea; let it stand, well covered, for 5 minutes; then strain; put the tea cream with the yolks of 8 eggs and 5 tablespoonfuls sugar in saucepan over the fire and stir till nearly boiling; finish the same as Creme Francaise a la Vanille.

120. Creme Francaise au Marasquin.— Place a saucepan with 1 quart cream, the yolks of 8 eggs, 1/2 cup sugar and 1 teaspoonful vanilla over the fire and stir till nearly boiling; remove it from the fire and add 16 sheets of gelatine which has been soaked in cold water for 10 minutes and pressed out; add lastly 1/2 pint maraschino and finish the same as Creme Francaise a la Vanille.

121. Creme Francaise au Rhum is made the same as the foregoing, substituting rum for maraschino.

122. Petits Pots Creme a la Vanille.— Mix well together 1 quart cream, yolks of 8 eggs, 4 whole eggs and 5 tablespoonfuls sugar; fill the cream into buttered custard cups, set them in a pan of hot water on top of the stove, cover with a pan or paper and boil till contents are firm; remove from fire and set aside to cool; in serving turn the cream onto a dish and send whipped cream to table with it.

123. Creme au Bain-Marie au Caramel.— Boil 3/4 cup sugar to a caramel (see Boiling Sugar), add a little boiling water, remove from fire and stir for a few minutes; then place a saucepan with 1 quart cream or milk, 4 whole eggs and the yolks of 8 eggs over the fire; add the caramel sugar and stir till nearly boiling; fill the cream into a buttered form, cover it tightly and place the form into a vessel of hot water; let it stand for 1-1/2 hours on the hot stove; the water should be boiling hot, but must not boil; when done take it from the fire, set in cool place; when cold and ready to serve turn the cream onto a round dish and send to table without sauce.

124. Creme au Bain-Marie au Chocolat.— Melt 4 tablespoonfuls Baker's chocolate in the oven; mix it with 1 quart cream or milk, 5 tablespoonfuls sugar and boil 5 minutes, stirring constantly; remove it from the fire and when cold add 4 whole eggs, the yolks of 8 and 1 teaspoonful vanilla; beat these well together with an egg beater; butter a form with a tube in the center and sprinkle with fine zwieback crumbs; pour in the cream, cover the form and set in a vessel of hot water; let it boil slowly for an hour; remove it from the fire and set aside to cool; when ready to serve turn the cream onto a dish, garnish with fancy cake and send whipped cream a la vanilla to table with it.

125. Vienna Orange Cream.— Soak 1 ounce gelatine in 1/2 cup cold water 15 minutes, add 1/2 cup boiling water and stir over the fire till dissolved; stir the yolks of 12 eggs with 12 tablespoonfuls sugar to a cream; add by degrees the juice of 8 oranges and 3 lemons, and lastly the gelatine; continue stirring until it begins to thicken; then add the whites, beaten to a stiff froth; rinse out a mould with cold water and sprinkle with sugar, pour in the cream and set it on ice for 2 hours.

126. Vienna Lemon Cream.— Stir the yolks of 10 eggs with 1 cup sugar to a cream; add the juice of 4 lemons and the grated rind of 1/2 a one; lay 12 sheets of gelatine in cold water for 10 minutes, press out and dissolve it in 1/2 cup boiling water; add it by degrees to the cream and continue stirring till it begins to thicken; then add the whites, beaten to a stiff froth; rinse out a form with cold water and sprinkle with sugar, turn in the cream and set on ice till firm.

127. Milk Cream.— Soak 1 ounce gelatine in 1 cup of milk; place a saucepan with 3 cups milk, 3/4 cup sugar, 1-1/2 teaspoonfuls vanilla and the yolks of 6 eggs in a vessel of boiling water and stir with an egg beater till nearly boiling; remove from the fire, add the gelatine and stir till it becomes cold and begins to thicken; then add the whites, beaten to a stiff froth, turn the cream into a form and set on ice till firm; serve with cold pineapple or strawberry sauce; the form should be rinsed with cold water and sprinkled with sugar before the cream is put in.

128. Russian Cream.— Stir the yolks of 9 eggs with 9 tablespoonfuls sugar for 1/2 hour; add the juice and grated rind of 1 lemon and 1/2 pint best rum; lay 5 sheets of gelatine for 5 minutes in cold water, press out and put it in 1/2 cup boiling water; stir until dissolved; then mix it by degrees, stirring constantly, with the above mixture; when it begins to thicken add the whites, beaten to a stiff froth, rinse out a mould with cold water, sprinkle with sugar, fill in the cream and set in a cool place till firm.

129. Sabayon of Oranges.— Soak 12 sheets of gelatine in cold water for 10 minutes; in the meantime put the juice of 4 oranges, the thin peel of 1, 3/4 cup sugar, 1/2 bottle wine (white is best), 2 whole eggs and the yolks of 6 in a saucepan over the fire; beat this with an egg beater till nearly boiling; remove it from the fire and take out the peel, press out the gelatine, add it to the cream and continue the beating till cold; fill it into a cream form and place for 2 hours on ice.

130. Sabayon of Lemon.— Soak 12 sheets of gelatine in cold water; put in a saucepan 2 whole eggs and the yolks of 10; add 1 cup sugar, the juice of 3 lemons, the thin peel of 1 and 1/2 bottle Rhine wine; beat this with an egg beater till nearly boiling; remove at once, press out the gelatine, add it to the cream and continue beating till cold and beginning to thicken; fill it into a cream form and set on ice till wanted.

131. Whipped Cream.— Put 1 quart of rich, sweet cream into a deep vessel or stone jar and let it stand on ice for an hour; then beat it with an egg beater until stiff; then add sufficient powdered sugar to sweeten and any kind of flavor that may be liked.

132. Whipped Cream (with Strawberries).— Put 1 quart ripe strawberries in a colander and rinse with cold water; when well drained put the berries into a glass dish, sprinkle over them 1 cup powdered sugar and set for 1/2 hour on ice; whip 1 pint sweet cream to a froth, sweeten with powdered sugar and set on ice until wanted; when ready for use pour the cream over berries and serve at once, or send each in a separate dish to the table.

133. Cream (with Pineapple).— Prepare the cream in the same manner as the foregoing; pare a ripe sugar-loaf pineapple and break it from the stalk into pieces with a silver fork; put the fruit into a glass dish and sprinkle 1 cup sugar over it; set the dish on ice for 1 hour; when ready to serve pour the cream over pineapple and send to table at once.

134. Whipped Cream (with Chocolate).— Boil 1/4 pound grated chocolate in 1/2 cup water with 1/2 cup sugar and a little vanilla; when cold mix it with 1 pint whipped cream and set on ice till wanted.

135. Whipped Cream (with Oranges).— Pare 6 large oranges, cut them into pieces, remove the pits, put the fruit into a glass dish and sprinkle over it 1/2 cup powdered sugar; have 1 pint cream, beaten to a stiff froth, mixed with 3 or 4 tablespoonfuls powdered sugar and set fruit and cream on ice till wanted; when ready to serve pour cream over the oranges and send to table at once, or serve each in a separate dish.

136. Creme Fouettee a la Cobby.— Mix with whipped cream some fruit marmalade and put it in layers in a glass dish with some preserved cherries and macaroons between each layer; arrange the cream high up in the dish and garnish with lady fingers or fancy cake.

137. Whipped Cream (with Peaches).— Pare and cut 6 large, ripe peaches into quarters; put the fruit into a glass dish, sprinkle over it 1/2 cup powdered sugar and set the dish on ice for 1 hour; also have 1 pint of whipped and sweetened cream standing on ice; in serving cover the peaches with cream; break some lady fingers apart, stand them around the dish and serve at once. Or serve cream and fruit in separate dishes. Instead of fresh fruit preserved fruit may be used.

138. Whipped Cream (with Cherries).— Remove the pits from 1 pound of large cherries; put the fruit in a glass dish with 1/2 cup sugar; set the dish for an hour or two on ice; also have 1 pint of whipped cream on ice; when ready to serve spread the cream over the cherries, or serve each in a separate dish, and send sponge or fancy cake to the table with it. Canned cherries, apricots or peaches may be substituted for fresh fruit.



BOILED CREAMS.

139. Vanilla Cream.— Place a saucepan with 1 pint cream or milk over the fire, add 2 tablespoonfuls flour, the yolks of 4 eggs, 1 tablespoonful butter, 3 tablespoonfuls sugar, 1 teaspoonful vanilla extract and a sprinkle of salt; stir this until it comes to a boil; when cold mix cream with the yolk of 1 egg and a little sweet cream.

140. Chocolate Cream.— Mix 2 tablespoonfuls flour with 1 pint of milk or cream; add 1/2 teaspoonful vanilla extract, 1/4 pound grated chocolate, 3 or 4 tablespoonfuls sugar, 1/2 tablespoonful butter, a sprinkle of salt and the yolks of 4 eggs; place this in a saucepan over the fire and stir till it boils; then remove and set aside to cool.

141. Orange Cream.— Mix 2 tablespoonfuls flour with 1 pint milk or cream, add 1/2 tablespoonful butter, 3-1/2 tablespoonfuls sugar, the yolks of 3 or 4 eggs and the grated rind of 1/2 an orange and stir the cream over the fire till it boils; then set aside to cool.

142. Almond Cream.— Pound 6 ounces of blanched almonds with a little cream to a paste; mix them with 1 pint of sweet cream or milk, add 2 tablespoonfuls flour, 3-1/2 tablespoonfuls sugar, the yolks of 4 eggs, a little salt, 1/2 teaspoonful vanilla extract and 1/2 tablespoonful butter; stir this over the fire till it boils; then remove and set the cream aside to cool.

143. Coffee Cream.— Put 3 ounces fresh roasted Mocha coffee into 1 pint boiling cream; let it stand 15 minutes; then strain, add to the coffee cream 2 tablespoonfuls flour, 1/2 tablespoonful butter, 4 tablespoonfuls sugar, a sprinkle of salt and the yolks of 6 eggs; stir this over the fire till it boils; remove it and set the cream aside to cool.

144. Creme Frangipane a la Vanille.— Mix 1/2 cup flour with 2 cups cream, add 5 well beaten eggs, a sprinkle of salt, 4 tablespoonfuls sugar, 1 tablespoonful butter and 1 teaspoonful vanilla; stir this over the fire till it boils; remove it, add 8 well pounded macaroons and set aside to cool. Instead of vanilla a little orange or lemon peel may be substituted. Blanched almonds, raisins, currants, finely cut citron or any kind of fruit such as pineapples, strawberries or peaches may also be used.



JELLIES.

145. Jellies should be as clear as crystal, not too sweet and just firm enough to hold together. Jellies that have to stand any length of time on the buffets must, of course, be firmer. A good plan is to make a trial by putting a little in a tin cup and setting it on ice before the jelly is put into a form.

146. To Clarify Gelatine.— Put 2 ounces gelatine in a saucepan, add 1/2 pint cold water and let it stand 10 minutes; then add 1/2 pint boiling water, set the saucepan in a vessel of boiling water and stir until gelatine is dissolved; beat the whites of 2 eggs to a froth, add the juice of 1 large lemon and a little cold water; stir this into the gelatine, continue stirring until it boils, remove to side of stove and let it stand 5 minutes without boiling; then strain through a jelly bag and use as directed in following recipes.

147. To Clarify Sugar.— Put 1 pound sugar in 1 pint cold water and stir till sugar is dissolved; then strain through a napkin. A quicker way is to boil the sugar and water with the juice of 1 lemon for a few minutes and strain the same way.

148. To Clarify Fruit Juice.— Lay a few sheets of filtering paper in water and let them soak for 15 minutes, changing the water twice; then press them out, pick into small pieces, wet a little again with water and put the paper into a small sieve; pour the fruit juice onto the paper and let it run through into a dish. If not clear the first time pour back again and let it run through once more.

149. Jelly Bag.— Take 3/4 yard of white flannel and make a bias bag; this is done by taking the flannel on the bias, sewing the bottom and side together to a point; cut it even on top and hem; then sew a string on each end of hem. In using the bag lay a broom with one end on the back of a chair and the other end on a table; tie the bag onto the broom, in the center, so that it hangs between the table and chair; set a bowl underneath the bag; then pour in the jelly; pour that which runs through first back again into the bag; repeat this once or twice more until the jelly runs through clear. When all the jelly has run through fill it into a mould and set either on ice or in a cool place.

150. Orange Jelly.— Clarify 2 ounces of gelatine as directed (see Clarifying Gelatine), dissolve 1 pound sugar in 1 pint water, add the thin peel of 2 oranges and let it stand 1 hour; then remove orange peel and strain the sugar syrup through a napkin; remove the peel from 4 oranges, divide them into small quarters and remove the pits without breaking the fruit; next pour the juice of 8 oranges and 2 lemons through filtering paper (see Clarifying Fruit Juice); as soon as the gelatine, fruit juice and sugar are clarified mix the three together, place a jelly form into cracked ice, pour in a few spoonfuls jelly and when firm lay in one-third of the orange quarters, which should be wiped dry with a napkin; add sufficient jelly to cover the fruit and when hard lay over another third; cover again with jelly and continue until all is used up; cover the form, lay some ice on top and let it stand till firm; when ready to serve dip the form into hot water, wipe it dry, remove cover, turn the jelly into a dish and serve with vanilla sauce or sweet cream. NOTE.—If the inside of jelly mould is brushed with pure almond oil the form need not be dipped in hot water, as the jelly will slip out without any trouble. Fine olive oil may also be used, but care should be taken to use only the very best, as otherwise the flavor of the jelly will be spoiled.

151. Plain Orange Jelly.— Dissolve and clarify 1 ounce gelatine in 1/2 pint water as directed, dissolve 1 cup sugar in 1/2 pint water, add the thin peel of 1 orange and let it stand 1 hour; then strain through a napkin; let the juice of 5 oranges and 1 lemon run through filtering paper or a fine napkin; mix the gelatine, fruit juice and sugar syrup together, pour it into a jelly mould and set in a cool place to get firm; when ready to serve dip the form into hot water, turn the jelly onto a dish and serve with the following sauce:—Beat 1 egg to a froth, add by degrees 1 cup milk, 2 tablespoonfuls sugar and 1 teaspoonful vanilla extract.

152. Lemon Jelly.— Clarify 2 ounces gelatine as directed, dissolve 1-1/4 pounds sugar in 1 pint water, add the grated rind of 2 lemons and let it stand 1/2 hour; then strain through a napkin; let 1 pint of lemon juice run through filtering paper (see Clarifying Fruit Juice); when the three ingredients have been clarified mix them together, fill the jelly into a jelly mould, set it on ice or in a cold place to get firm and serve same as Orange Jelly.

153. Strawberry Jelly.— Put 1 quart ripe strawberries in a colander, rinse them off with cold water and when drained mash them well in a bowl with a silver spoon; dissolve 3/4 pound sugar in 1 pint cold water, add the juice of 1 lemon and put it over the fire to boil 5 minutes; strain through a napkin and when cold pour it over the strawberries; let them stand 3 hours; then strain the berries, first through a jelly bag and then through filtering paper; also let the juice of 2 oranges run through filtering paper; clarify 2 ounces gelatine as directed and when cold add it to the fruit juice; then make a trial by filling a few spoonfuls in a tin cup and set it on ice to form; if not firm enough add a little more dissolved gelatine; fill the jelly alternately with large strawberries in a jelly form and finish the same as Orange Jelly; serve with whipped cream.

154. Pineapple Jelly.— Pare and cut a large, ripe pineapple into quarters, remove the hard core from the center and cut the quarters of pineapple into fine slices; dissolve 1 pound sugar in 1 pint cold water and juice of 1 lemon, pour it over the pineapple pieces, cover and let it stand for 2 hours; chop the eyes and hard core of pineapple very fine, put them with 1 pint water in a saucepan over the fire and boil slowly 1/2 hour; when cold strain them and add the liquid to the pineapple; in the meantime clarify 2 ounces gelatine as directed; then drain the pineapple in a sieve, wipe the slices dry with a napkin and lay them on a plate; let the pineapple syrup run through filtering paper or napkin and mix it with the clarified gelatine; also let the juice of 2 oranges and 1 lemon run through filtering paper and add it to the jelly; then make a trial to see if firm enough; place jelly form in cracked ice, pour a few spoonfuls of jelly into the form and when hard put in a layer of pineapple; cover them with jelly and when firm put in another layer of pineapple; continue until all is used up; then cover the form, put some ice on top of form and let it remain till jelly is firm; serve with or without cream or vanilla sauce. This jelly may also be made of preserved pineapple.

155. Jelly of Peaches.— Pare 8 large, ripe peaches, cut them into halves, remove the stones and cut each half into 3 or 4 pieces; put the fruit into a bowl and pour over it 1 pint of sugar syrup; let them stand well covered for 2 hours; scald the pits, remove the brown skin and put them with the peaches; then let the syrup run through filtering paper, mix it with 2 ounces clarified gelatine, fill the jelly with the peaches and pits in alternate layers in a form and finish the same as Orange Jelly.

156. Raspberry Jelly.— Press the juice from 1 quart ripe raspberries, add the juice of 1 lemon and filter it through filtering paper (see Clarifying Fruit Juice); dissolve 3/4 pound sugar in 1 pint water, strain through a napkin and add it to the raspberry juice; add 2 ounces clarified gelatine; set a jelly form into cracked ice and fill the jelly alternately with large, ripe raspberries into the form and finish the same as Orange Jelly.

157. Wine Jelly.— Soak 2 ounces gelatine in 1/2 pint cold water for 10 minutes; then add 1/2 pint boiling water and stir the whole over the fire till gelatine is dissolved; add the rind and juice of 1 lemon, 2 whole cloves, a small piece of cinnamon and the well beaten whites of 2 eggs; stir this with an egg beater till it boils; then remove the saucepan with its contents to side of stove and let it remain for 5 minutes without boiling; then strain it through a flannel jelly bag; dissolve 3/4 pound sugar in 1 pint cold water, strain it through a napkin and add it with 1 pint Madeira to the gelatine; rinse out a jelly mould with cold water, pour in the jelly and set it on ice or in a cool place till firm. Instead of Madeira wine any other kind may be used.

158. Rhine Wine Jelly.— Dissolve and clarify 2 ounces gelatine and dissolve 1 pound sugar in 1 pint water; add the rind of 2 lemons and the juice of 1; let it stand 1 hour; then strain through a napkin; let the juice of 2 lemons run through filtering paper, add it with 1 pint Rhine wine and the sugar syrup to the clarified gelatine, fill the jelly in a form and set it on ice or in a cool place.

159. Champagne Jelly.— Dissolve and clarify 2 ounces gelatine (see Gelatine), dissolve 3/4 pound sugar in 1 pint cold water, strain it through a napkin, add to the gelatine with 1/2 bottle champagne and the filtered juice of 4 lemons, fill into a form and set it in a cool place or on ice.

160. Apple Jelly.— Grate 1 quart tart apples, put them in a bag and press out the juice, add the juice of 1 orange and let both run through a filtering paper; clarify 2 ounces gelatine, dissolve 3/4 pound sugar in 1 pint cold water, strain through a napkin and add it with the apple juice to the clarified gelatine; rinse a mould with cold water, pour in the jelly and set it in a cool place or on ice till firm. Another way is:—Pare, core and quarter some tart apples and boil them in sugar syrup to which the juice of 1 lemon has been added; when the apples are done remove carefully, so as not to break them, lay on a sieve to drain and when cold lay into the mould alternately with the jelly and finish like Orange Jelly.

161. Cider Jelly.— Soak 2 ounces gelatine in 1/2 pint cold water for 15 minutes; then add 1/2 pint boiling water, put it over the fire and stir till gelatine is dissolved; add the juice of 1 lemon and the beaten whites of 2 eggs; stir with an egg beater until it boils; then draw to side of stove and let it stand 5 minutes; then strain through a flannel jelly bag; dissolve 3/4 pound sugar in 1 quart sweet cider, strain through a jelly bag and add it to the gelatine; pour it into a jelly mould and set in a cool place until firm.

162. Rose Jelly.— Put 1 quart of freshly gathered rose leaves in a glass jar, squeeze the juice of 1 lemon over them, pour over the whole 1 cup boiling water, close the jar tightly and set aside till next day; then press out the juice (by putting the rose leaves in a coarse bag), let the liquid run through filtering paper (see Clarifying Fruit Juice), add 1 pint cold clarified sugar syrup, 1/2 pint white wine and 2 ounces clarified gelatine; next pour the jelly into a mould and set aside to cool.

163. Gelee Russe.— Clarify 1 ounce gelatine and dissolve 1/2 pound sugar in 1/2 pint water; add the grated peel of 2 lemons; let it stand 15 minutes; then strain through a napkin; let 1/2 pint lemon juice run through filtering paper; mix the clarified gelatine, sugar syrup and lemon juice together; put it in a deep kettle, set into cracked ice and whip the contents until it foams and begins to thicken; then fill it into a form and cover and pack with cracked ice till firm, which will take about 2 hours. Orange and Wine Jelly may be made in the same manner.

164. Macedoine de Fruit a la Russe.— Prepare a Rhine Wine Jelly, set a form into cracked ice, pour in a few spoonfuls jelly and let it get hard; lay over it a layer of fruit, such as strawberries, slices of pineapple or peaches, and pour over sufficient jelly to cover the fruit; put the remaining jelly into a deep kettle, set into cracked ice and beat with an egg beater till it foams and begins to thicken; then mix with 3 or 4 different kinds of fruit, either fresh or preserved, fill into the jelly form, cover closely and let it stand 2 hours; when ready to serve dip the form in hot water, wipe it dry, remove the cover, turn the jelly onto a dish and garnish with sugared fruit.

165. Calvesfoot Jelly.— Choose 4 calves' feet with the skin on (if without the skin 6 must be taken), crack and wash them well, put over the fire, cover with cold water and boil till they fall apart; strain the liquor through a fine sieve and let it stand in a cool place; next day skim off every particle of fat and remove the sediment; put the jelly over the fire and reduce it down to 2 quarts by boiling; beat up the whites of 4 eggs, add a little cold water, the juice of 2 lemons and the thin peel of one, 6 cloves and a piece of cinnamon; add this to the contents of saucepan, stirring constantly; boil for a few minutes; then move the saucepan to side of stove and let it stand for 5 minutes without boiling; then strain it through a double flannel bag; dissolve 2 cups sugar in 1 pint sherry or Madeira wine, strain through a napkin and add it to the strained jelly; rinse out the moulds with cold water, put in the jelly and set in a cool place. This jelly may be put into tightly corked bottles, and will keep for a long time. When wanted for use set the bottle in hot water until the jelly melts; then pour it into moulds and set in a cool place till firm.

166. Macedoine de Fruits au vin du Rhine.— Prepare a Rhine wine jelly a little stiffer than the ordinary jellies; take large, ripe raspberries, strawberries, currants, peaches (pared and cut into eighths) and pineapples cut into small slices; put them in a dish on ice; next set a form into cracked ice, pour in a few spoonfuls jelly and when hard lay in some of the fruit, either each kind by itself in small clusters or mixed one with the other; pour over this sufficient jelly to cover the fruit; let it get hard and again lay over some fruit; continue alternately with fruit and jelly till form is full; cover and let it remain in ice till firm; in serving dip the form into hot water, wipe it dry and turn the macedoine onto a round dish. In winter preserved fruit and apples and pears may be used. The apples and pears are to be cut into quarters and boiled for a few minutes in sugar syrup. The latter should be colored with a little cochineal.

167. Gelee a la Moscovite.— Any kind of fruit jelly may be used for this, using only half the quantity of gelatine as for jelly; put into a form, cover it, paste a strip of buttered paper around the edge of cover and pack the form in ice and rock salt for 2 hours; only freeze about an inch all around, leaving it soft in the center; preserved fruit may be mixed with the jelly before it is put into the form; serve the moscovite in a glass dish and garnish with fruit or fancy cake.

168. Orange Baskets (with Jelly).— Choose 1 dozen large oranges and cut them into the shape of small baskets with handles; this is done by holding the orange in the left hand and cutting with a penknife a small quarter from each side of the orange toward the top, so as to leave the skin for the handle 1/2 inch wide; then cut the skin evenly all around; next separate the inside from the outside skin with the penknife and completely hollow the orange out, so that only little more than half of the skin with the handle is left; cut the edges into small scallops with a scizzors and lay the baskets in cold water; press out the juice from the oranges and with it make a jelly (see Orange Jelly); take the baskets from the water, wipe dry and with a napkin under them set on a tray; have the jelly on ice and when it begins to thicken fill up the baskets and place them on ice; if there should be any small holes in the baskets paste them up from the outside with butter, which must be removed before serving; serve on a napkin and garnish with green leaves. These baskets may also be filled with Gelee Russe.

169. Orange Quarters Used for Garnishing Jellies and Other Dishes.— Take 6 large oranges, cut out a round piece on the side of stem and hollow out so that nothing is left but the outside skin; care must be taken to leave none of the white coating on the inside of skin; after preparing this way put them in a saucepan over the fire with boiling water and boil 5 minutes; rinse with cold water, wipe them dry and fill each one either with clear jelly of different colors or blanc-mange; set them on ice until hard; cut them into quarters and use for garnishing different dishes. Small patty forms filled with jelly are also used for the same purpose.

170. Almond Blanc-Mange.— Soak 1 ounce gelatine in 1 cup cold milk for 15 minutes; then add 3 cups boiling milk, 6 tablespoonfuls sugar, 1/4 pound blanched almonds (among the latter there should be a few bitter ones) and pound them in a mortar with a little water to a paste; set the saucepan with its contents into a vessel of boiling water and stir till it boils; remove from the fire and let it stand for 5 minutes; then strain through a muslin bag, add 1 teaspoonful extract of vanilla and set aside to cool; rinse out a quart mould with cold water and sprinkle with sugar; pour in the cold blanc-mange and set in a cool place till it becomes firm; when ready to serve loosen the blanc-mange around the edge on top and turn it over onto a dish; it may then be served either with or without fruit or vanilla sauce. Instead of almonds any other kind of flavoring may be used.

171. Chocolate Blanc-Mange.— Soak 1 ounce gelatine in 1 cup cold milk for 15 minutes; then add 2-1/2 cups boiling milk; mix 1/4 pound grated Baker's chocolate with 1/2 cup cold milk; add it to the gelatine with 6 tablespoonfuls sugar; place this in a saucepan over the fire and stir till it boils; remove from fire, add 1 teaspoonful vanilla extract and when cold pour it into the moulds, which have been rinsed out with cold water and sprinkled with sugar; set in a cool place till firm; this may be served with or without vanilla sauce.

172. Blanc-Mange Marbre au Chocolat.— Make half the quantity of both the Almond and Chocolate Blanc-Mange; rinse out a mould with cold water, sprinkle with sugar and place into cracked ice; pour in a few spoonfuls almond blanc-mange and let it get firm; then put in a few spoonfuls chocolate blanc-mange; when the latter is firm again put in some of the almond blanc-mange; continue in this way until all is used; let the form remain for 2 hours on ice and then serve with vanilla sauce.

173. Cream Blanc-Mange.— Soak in a small tin 1/2 ounce gelatine in 1/2 cup cold water for 15 minutes; set the tin in a saucepan of boiling water and stir until gelatine is dissolved; beat 1 pint rich, sweet cream to a stiff froth; add 4 tablespoonfuls powdered sugar and 1 teaspoonful vanilla or lemon flavoring; when this is well mixed add the gelatine by degrees, beating constantly; rinse out a mould with cold water, sprinkle with sugar, fill in the blanc-mange and set on ice an hour or two before serving.

174. Plain Blanc-Mange.— Boil 1 quart milk with 6 tablespoonfuls sugar; add 1 ounce gelatine which has been soaked in a little cold water for 15 minutes; stir this over the fire until gelatine is dissolved; remove it from fire and when cold add 2 teaspoonfuls vanilla; rinse out a form with cold water, sprinkle with sugar, pour in the blanc-mange and set it on ice; serve with vanilla sauce.

175. Cocoanut Blanc-Mange.— Stir into the plain blanc-mange when it begins to thicken 2 cups freshly grated cocoanut.

176. Neapolitan Blanc-Mange.— Prepare an almond blanc-mange, strain and divide it into 4 equal parts; add to first part 1 tablespoonful grated chocolate and let it boil for a few minutes; mix second part with the yolks of 2 eggs and stir it over the fire till just about to boil; add to third part a few drops of cochineal, to color it pink; leave fourth part uncolored; rinse out a mould with cold water, sprinkle with sugar and place it into cracked ice; as soon as the blanc-mange becomes cold and begins to thicken put in first the white; after 5 minutes put in the pink; again waiting 5 minutes, put in the yellow and after a few minutes put in the chocolate; let it remain on ice till firm; when ready to serve work top free from the edge with a few light touches of your finger and turn the blanc-mange onto a dish.

177. Nest with Eggs.— Prepare 1 quart almond blanc-mange; take 12 fresh eggs, make a small hole in one end of each and let the contents flow out; rinse each shell well with cold water; then fill them with blanc-mange and set in a pan of sugar or flour, the open end up; place them in a cool place till hard; boil 1 pound sugar to a crack and spin it into quite long threads (see Spinning Sugar); with these threads form a nest a little smaller than the dish it is to be served in; dip each egg into warm water, wipe dry, break shells from about the blanc-mange and lay the artificial eggs in the nest. Another way is to make 1-1/2 quarts orange or wine jelly; cut the rind of 3 oranges into long narrow strips and boil them for 20 minutes in water, changing the water 3 times; drain them on a sieve; put 1-1/2 cups sugar with 1 pint water over the fire and when it boils add the orange peel; boil 15 minutes; remove and drain them on a sieve; put half of the jelly into a glass dish and when firm lay the artificial eggs upon it; arrange them the same way that natural eggs are generally found in a nest; lay orange peel, which represents the straw, over and around the eggs; when the remaining jelly is cold and thick pour it over the eggs and set in a cool place to form.

178. Fromage Bavarois a la Vanille.— Soak 1 ounce gelatine in 1 cup cold water 20 minutes; place a saucepan with 1 pint cream, the yolks of 6 eggs, 1/2 cup sugar and 1 teaspoonful vanilla over the fire and stir till nearly boiling; remove it from the fire, add gelatine and stir till dissolved; set saucepan with its contents in a vessel of cold water and stir till it becomes cold and begins to thicken; then mix it with 1 pint whipped cream; rinse a form with cold water, sprinkle the inside with sugar, fill in the bavarois and set for 2 hours on ice; serve on a round dish garnished with fancy cakes.

179. Fromage Bavarois a la Vanille, No. 2.— Boil 6 tablespoonfuls sugar in 1 cup water 5 minutes and flavor with 1-1/2 teaspoonfuls vanilla; soak 1 ounce gelatine in 1 cup cold water 15 minutes, add it to the boiling sugar syrup and stir till melted; then set aside; when cold and beginning to thicken mix it with 1 pint whipped cream and finish the same as in foregoing recipe.

180. Fromage Bavarois aux Pistache.— Chop or pound 6 ounces pistachio nuts and 1/4 pound almonds as finely as possible, mix with 1 pint cold sugar syrup and let them stand 2 hours; then strain through a fine sieve, add a little spinach green (see Color) and 1 ounce dissolved gelatine; stir until it begins to thicken; then mix with 1 pint whipped cream; put this into a form and place on ice for 2 hours. This cream should have a delicate green color; it is served on a round dish.

181. Fromage Bavarois aux Amandes.— Scald 1/2 pound sweet and 10 bitter almonds with boiling water, remove the brown skin and pound or chop them fine; place a saucepan over the fire with 1 pint milk, 6 tablespoonfuls sugar, the yolks of 6 eggs, 1-1/2 teaspoonfuls vanilla and the pounded almonds; stir until nearly boiling; soak 1-1/4 ounces gelatine in 1 cup cold milk, add it to the hot milk and stir till dissolved; then strain through a sieve; when cold and beginning to thicken stir in 1 pint whipped cream, turn into a form and set for 2 hours in cracked ice.

182. Fromage Bavarois au Cafe.— Pour 1 pint boiling milk over 4 tablespoonfuls freshly ground coffee, cover and let it stand 5 minutes; strain through a fine cloth; soak 1 ounce gelatine in a little cold water 15 minutes and add it to the coffee milk with 6 tablespoonfuls sugar and the yolks of 6 eggs; stir this over the fire till it nearly boils; remove from the fire and when cold and beginning to thicken stir in 1 pint whipped cream, turn into a form and pack in cracked ice 2 hours.

183. Fromage Bavarois au The.— Pour 1 pint boiling milk over 2 tablespoonfuls of the best black or green tea, cover and let it stand 5 minutes; then strain and finish the same as Fromage Bavarois au Cafe.

184. Fromage Bavarois au Chocolat.— Boil 4 tablespoonfuls grated chocolate in 1/2 pint water, add 1/2 cup sugar and 1 teaspoonful vanilla; soak 1 ounce gelatine in 1 cup cold water 15 minutes, add it to the chocolate and boil a few minutes; remove from the fire and when cold mix it with 1 pint whipped cream, turn into a form and pack in cracked ice for 2 hours; then serve on a round dish with vanilla sauce.

185. Lemon Fromage.— Dissolve 1 cup sugar in 1/2 pint water, add the thin peel of 1 lemon, the juice of 3 and boil 5 minutes; add 1 ounce gelatine which has been soaked in 1/2 pint cold water and stir it until dissolved; then strain and when cold and beginning to thicken add 1 pint whipped cream; fill this into a form and place it on ice for 2 hours.

186. Orange Fromage.— Soak 1 ounce gelatine in 1 cup cold water 15 minutes; dissolve 1 cup sugar in 1 cup water, add the thin peel of 1 orange and boil 5 minutes; add gelatine and stir till melted; mix it with the juice of 6 oranges, strain and when cold and beginning to thicken add 1 pint whipped cream; turn into a form and pack in ice for 2 hours.

187. Pineapple Fromage.— Soak 1-1/2 ounces gelatine in 1 cup cold water 15 minutes and stir it over the fire till dissolved; take 1 can preserved pineapple, drain off the liquor and add it to the gelatine; when cold and beginning to thicken cut the pineapple into small dice; stir the fruit with 1 pint whipped cream into the gelatine, turn into a form and pack it in cracked ice for 2 hours. Or peel a large, ripe pineapple, remove the eyes and hard core, cut into small square pieces, put them in a dish, sprinkle over with 1 cup sugar and let them stand for 2 hours; chop the eyes and core fine and put them in a dish; boil 1/2 cup sugar with 1 cup water, pour it boiling hot over the chopped pineapple and let it stand till cold; soak 1-1/2 ounces gelatine in 1/2 pint cold water, put it over the fire and stir till dissolved; strain the chopped pineapple through a fine sieve, drain off liquid from the pieces and add them together to the gelatine; set in ice and stir till it begins to thicken; then stir in the pineapple pieces and 1 pint whipped cream; fill it into a plain form with tube in center and pack in cracked ice and a little rock salt for 2 hours.

188. Peach Fromage.— Pare and cut into quarters 1-1/2 dozen ripe peaches, put with 1 cup powdered sugar into a dish and let them stand 2 hours; also add the peach pits (after they have been scalded and freed from their brown skin); soak 1-1/2 ounces gelatine in 3/4 cup cold water for 15 minutes, add 3/4 cup boiling water and stir over the fire till melted; strain and set aside to cool; press the peaches through a sieve, add gelatine and pits and stir till it begins to thicken; then carefully stir in 1 pint whipped cream, turn into a form and place for 2 hours on ice.

189. Strawberry Fromage.— Soak 1 ounce gelatine in 1/2 pint cold water 15 minutes; then stir it over the fire till dissolved; wash and press 1 quart fresh strawberries through a sieve, add 1 cup powdered sugar, the gelatine and a few drops cochineal; stir until it begins to thicken; then add 1 pint whipped cream, turn into a form and pack for 2 hours in cracked ice and rock salt.

190. Rum Bavarois.— Soak 1-1/4 ounces gelatine in 3/4 cup cold water 15 minutes, add 3/4 cup boiling water, stir over the fire till dissolved, strain and set aside; place a saucepan with the yolks of 6 eggs, 3/4 cup sugar and 1 pint milk over the fire and stir till nearly boiling; remove from the fire, add 1/2 pint rum and the gelatine and continue stirring until it begins to thicken; then stir in carefully 1 pint whipped cream, turn into a form and pack in cracked ice for 2 hours.

191. Fromage Bavarois Cardinal.— Soak 3/4 ounce gelatine in 1/2 cup water 15 minutes; boil 1/4 pound unsweetened grated chocolate in 1 cup water with 2 tablespoonfuls sugar; add the gelatine and stir till dissolved; lay a plain form into cracked ice, pour the chocolate in by degrees and keep turning so that chocolate may form a complete lining inside of form; then set the form straight and pour in the bottom the remaining chocolate; as soon as this is hard fill the form with Bavarois of Vanilla, No. 2, and let it remain buried in ice for 2 hours.

192. Bavarois may be made of different colors—such as pistachio cream outside and bavarois of almonds inside; or strawberries outside and vanilla bavarois inside.

193. Fromage Bavarois au Pain Noir.— Cut a small pumpernickel into slices, lay on a tin in the oven to dry and roll them fine; take 1 cup of these crumbs and stir them into a bavarois of almond or vanilla; after the cream has been added turn into a form and pack in ice for 2 hours. For all bavarois the forms may be lined first with jelly and decorated with fruits, nuts, currants, etc. In order to do this place a form into cracked ice and pour in a few spoonfuls fruit jelly; when firm take whatever is going to be used onto a larding needle, dip each piece into jelly and lay them into the form in fancy patterns; pour in a little more jelly and when firm lay the form over on its side; pour in a little jelly at a time; keep turning form, so that the whole inside may be covered with jelly; then decorate the same as bottom and fill with Fromage Bavarois a la Vanille or any other kind.

194. Snow Pudding.— Soak 1 ounce gelatine in 1 pint cold water 20 minutes, add 1 pint boiling water, 1 cup sugar, the juice of 2 lemons and the thin peel of 1; set it over the fire, stir and boil a few minutes, strain through a sieve and when it begins to thicken add the beaten whites of 6 eggs; rinse out a form with cold water, sprinkle with granulated sugar, fill in the mixture and set in a cool place; when ready to serve turn the pudding onto a dish and serve with vanilla sauce made of the yolks of 6 eggs (see Sauce). Milk or cream may be substituted for water; then the lemon juice is omitted and lemon extract used for flavoring.

195. Wine Pudding.— Soak 1 ounce gelatine for 10 minutes in 1 pint cold water, add 1/4 pound sugar, 1/2 pint red wine and 1/2 pint raspberry juice; stir over the fire till boiling hot, strain through a jelly bag and put in a form to cool; when firm turn out on a flat dish and serve with vanilla sauce or whipped cream.

196. Apple Jelly Pudding.— Boil 1-1/2 pounds peeled apples with 1 quart water, stir through a sieve, add 1/2 pound sugar and the juice of 2 lemons; soak 15 sheets of white and 3 of red gelatine for 5 minutes in cold water, press out and mix with the apple sauce; stir over the fire until the gelatine is all dissolved; then pour into a form and set on ice to get firm; serve with vanilla sauce.

197. Maraschino Pudding.— Take 10 eggs, 10 tablespoonfuls sugar, 14 sheets gelatine (soaked in cold water), 1/4 pint rum (or maraschino) and the peel and juice of 1 lemon; stir the yolks and sugar to a cream and add by degrees rum and lemon; press out the gelatine and dissolve in 1 cup boiling water; add it, stirring constantly, to the other mixture; add lastly the whites of the eggs, which have been beaten to a stiff froth; next pour into a mould and set aside to cool; the mould should be rinsed with cold water and sprinkled with granulated sugar before pouring the pudding into it.

198. Manilla Pudding.— Place a saucepan over the fire with 1 pint milk, the yolks of 5 eggs, 4 tablespoonfuls sugar and the peel of 1 lemon; stir this over the fire until just about to boil; then instantly remove; have 1 ounce gelatine soaked in 1 cup milk, which stir into the hot mixture and set aside to cool; as soon as it begins to thicken add the whites of the eggs, beaten to a stiff froth, pour into a mould and set on ice to get firm; serve with fruit or claret sauce; the mould should be rinsed with cold water and sprinkled with coarse sugar previous to being used.

199. Rum Pudding.— Take 10 eggs (yolks and whites beaten separately), 1 pint sweet cream, 1/2 pound sugar, 1/2 pint rum and 1-1/2 ounces gelatine; stir the yolks of the eggs and sugar to a cream, add the cream and rum, put this in a tin pail and set in a vessel of hot water; keep stirring with an egg beater until just about to boil; then quickly remove from the fire; have gelatine soaked in a little cold water, add it to the cream and mix well; when cold add the beaten whites of the eggs, pour into a mould and set on ice; in serving turn out and send fruit sauce to table with it.

200. Fine Chocolate Pudding.— 1/4 pound Baker's grated chocolate, 3 cups milk, 1 cup water, 1-1/2 ounces gelatine, 5 tablespoonfuls sugar and 6 eggs; boil chocolate with the water until well dissolved; soak gelatine in a little cold water about 5 minutes; place a saucepan with the milk, sugar, 6 yolks of the eggs and the boiled chocolate over the fire; beat the whole with an egg beater until just about to boil; add the gelatine, remove from fire, continue beating for a little while longer and set aside to cool; when it begins to thicken add whites of the eggs, previously beaten to a stiff froth, and pour it into a jelly mould which has been well rinsed with cold water and sprinkled with sugar; set either on ice or in cold water to get firm. In serving turn pudding onto a glass dish and serve with the following sauce:—Place a saucepan over the fire with 2 eggs, 1 pint milk, 1 teaspoonful cornstarch and 2 tablespoonfuls sugar; stir with an egg beater until nearly boiling; quickly remove from fire, flavor with 1 teaspoonful vanilla extract and serve cold. This will make a sufficient quantity for a family of 10 persons.

201. Fine Claret Pudding.— 1 pint claret, 1/2 pint water, 1/2 tablespoonful cornstarch, the thin peel of 1/2 lemon, 4 tablespoonfuls sugar, 4 eggs and 8 sheets of red gelatine; lay gelatine in cold water and let it remain until the pudding is prepared; put the wine, water, cornstarch, sugar, lemon peel and yolks of the 4 eggs in a saucepan and beat it up well with an egg beater for 5 minutes; then place saucepan with its contents over the fire and continue beating till just before boiling; remove from the fire, squeeze the water from gelatine, put it into the saucepan and mix with its contents; then set aside to cool; as soon as it begins to thicken add the whites of the 4 eggs, previously beaten to a very stiff froth; when this is well blended together rinse a jelly mould with cold water, sprinkle with sugar, pour in the mixture and set it either in cold water or on ice to get firm; serve with vanilla or cream sauce or turn the pudding onto a glass dish and lay a border of whipped cream around it. This pudding if made according to above recipe is very fine and sufficient for a family of 6 persons.

202. White Wine Pudding.— 1/2 bottle white wine, 2 of red and 6 sheets of white gelatine, the grated rind and juice of 1 lemon, a little vanilla, 5 eggs and 6 tablespoonfuls sugar; lay the gelatine in cold water; place a saucepan with yolks of the 5 eggs, lemon, sugar, vanilla and wine over the fire and stir constantly until just about to boil; then remove from fire, press gelatine out, add to the hot mixture and set aside to cool; as soon as it begins to set whip whites of the 5 eggs to a stiff froth and stir them through it; fill a jelly mould with the mixture and set it on ice to get firm; serve with vanilla sauce. The mould should be rinsed with cold water and dusted with coarse sugar previous to pouring the pudding into it.

203. Cold Apple Pudding.— Put 1-1/2 pounds peeled and sliced apples in a saucepan with 1-1/2 quarts water; stew till tender, strain through a colander, return it to saucepan and add 1 pound sugar; soak 2 ounces gelatine in a little cold water, add to the apples, let the whole boil for a few minutes and pour it into a form to cool; serve with vanilla sauce.



FINE COLD PUDDINGS.

204. Pudding a la Polonaise.— Beat the yolks of 10 eggs and 2 whole eggs with an egg beater with 1-1/2 pints Rhine wine (or white wine), 1 cup sugar and the grated rind of 1 lemon and the juice of 4; strain this into a large kettle and beat over a slow fire till nearly boiling; remove the kettle, place it into cracked ice or cold water and continue beating till cold; in the meantime soak 1-1/2 ounces gelatine in 1/2 cup cold water for 15 minutes, add 1/2 cup boiling water and stir over the fire till dissolved; then stir it slowly into the cream, beating constantly; add lastly 1/2 cup rum; next place a cream form into cracked ice, put in a few spoonfuls cream and put over this a layer of vanilla wafers which have been soaked in sugar syrup with a little rum; after 5 minutes add more cream and wafers; continue until the cream is used up; leave on ice for 2 hours; when ready to serve dip the form into hot water, turn the pudding onto a round dish and serve; sufficient for 12 persons. If this pudding is too large half the quantities may be used.

205. Peach Pudding (with Champagne).— Pare and cut into halves 1-1/2 dozen large, ripe peaches; put them into a dish with the blanched pits, add 1 cup sugar, 1 teaspoonful vanilla, or put 1/2 stick vanilla between the fruit; cover and let them stand about 2 hours; then divide the peaches into 2 parts: press one part through a hair sieve and add the peach juice and 1-1/2 ounces gelatine previously soaked in cold water and dissolved in boiling water; when this is well mixed set it aside; cut some small sponge cakes into slices, put on a plate and pour a little champagne over them; set a plain tin form into cracked ice and pour in some champagne jelly (see Jelly); let it get firm and lay in the center one of the peach pits; lay around this some of the peach halves, pour a few spoonfuls more jelly over them and then a thin layer of whipped champagne jelly which has been colored with cochineal to a delicate pink; add to the peaches which have been pressed through a sieve 1 pint whipped cream and 1/2 bottle champagne; fill the cream in alternate layers with peaches and sponge cake into the form; let the last layer be cream; let the form remain 2 hours longer in the ice; in serving dip the form in hot water, turn the pudding onto a handsome dish and garnish the edge with small croutons of champagne jelly which has been colored to a delicate pink with cochineal. White wine may be substituted for champagne.

206. Pineapple Pudding a la Royale.— Pare and cut in half a nice, ripe pineapple; remove the hard part from the center and cut the pineapple into fine slices; put into a bowl and sprinkle 8 tablespoonfuls sugar over them, cover and let stand 2 hours; in the meantime prepare 1 pint white wine jelly; set a plain tin form into cracked ice, pour some jelly into it and let stand till firm; then put a wreath or a star of pineapple over the jelly, sprinkle a few blanched almonds between them and pour some more jelly over it; when this is firm turn form on its side, pour a little jelly in and keep turning in the cracked ice till jelly is firm; lay slices of pineapple on the sides, sprinkle blanched almonds cut into strips between, pour over a little more jelly and turn the form till all is firm; in the meantime boil 1 pound sugar with 1 cup water 10 minutes and add 1 ounce gelatine which has been previously soaked in 1/2 cup cold water and dissolved in 1/2 cup boiling water; remove the slices of pineapple, add the juice from pineapple to the boiled syrup, set this into cracked ice and stir till it begins to thicken; then add 1 pint whipped cream and fill the cream into the form alternately with layers of lady fingers and macaroons which have been previously dipped into the syrup; cover the form and pack it in ice for 2 hours; cut the remaining slices of pineapple into dice, mix with some of the cold jelly, put in small tin forms and garnish the pudding, when turned out, with them.

207. Orange Pudding a la Maltaise.— Boil 1-1/2 cups sugar with 1 cup water 5 minutes; add the juice of 6 oranges, the grated rind of 2 and 1-1/2 ounces gelatine which has been soaked for 1/2 hour in cold water; stir until gelatine is melted, strain through a fine sieve, place on ice and stir till it begins to thicken; then add 1 pint whipped cream; mix the juice of 6 oranges and 1 lemon with 1 cup sugar syrup and strain through a sieve; cut the crust off a sponge cake which has been baked in a deep pan the day before, cut the cake into slices about 1/2 inch in thickness and dip each slice in the orange liquor; set a plain tin form into cracked ice and pour in 1/2 pint plain orange jelly (see Jelly); let this get firm; decorate the bottom with a wreath of green pistachio nuts or blanched almonds and currants, or any kind of fruit, such as strawberries, cherries or plums; pour over some jelly; as soon as firm add a few spoonfuls jelly, then a layer of the orange cream and over this the sponge cake; continue with layers of cream and sponge cake till all is used; let the last layer be cream; let the form remain in ice for 2 hours; in serving turn the pudding onto a handsome round dish and garnish with orange quarters glazed with sugar.

208. Pudding de Savoie a l'Orange.— Remove the skin from 3 oranges, divide them into quarters and remove pits without disfiguring the fruit; boil 1-1/2 cups sugar with 1 cup water 5 minutes, remove it from the fire, add 1/2 pint Rhine wine, the juice of 6 large oranges and the grated rind of one: when cold add 2 ounces dissolved gelatine (see Gelatine), set on ice and stir till it begins to thicken; then add the orange quarters; place a tin form in cracked ice and cover the bottom with some clear orange or lemon jelly to the depth of about 1/2 inch; as soon as jelly is firm decorate the bottom with orange quarters and blanched nuts; add to the juice of 6 oranges 1/2 bottle Rhine wine and sweeten with sugar; cut a medium sized sponge cake into slices, dip in the orange juice and put them in alternate layers with orange and jelly into the form; let it remain on ice 2 hours; when ready to serve dip the form into hot water, turn onto a round dish and decorate the edge with orange quarters and finely chopped orange jelly.

209. Chestnut Pudding a la Dauphine.— Boil 1 pound chestnuts for a few minutes, throw them into cold water and remove outside and inside brown skin; then boil the chestnuts in milk till soft and press them through a sieve; add to puree the yolks of 6 eggs, 1 pint cream, 1 teaspoonful vanilla and 6 tablespoonfuls sugar; stir this over the fire till nearly boiling, add 1-1/2 ounces dissolved gelatine, set the cream into cracked ice and stir till it begins to thicken; cut some sponge cake into slices and pour a little rum over them; then place a tin form in cracked ice (if a form is not handy use a tin kettle), pour a few spoonfuls of the cream into it and let stand till firm; lay over this some preserved apricots or pineapples with 1/4 pound citron cut into dice and the sponge cake; continue this in alternate layers till all is used; let the pudding remain for 2 hours in ice; when ready to serve dip the form into hot water, turn pudding onto a dish and pour 1/2 pint vanilla syrup over it.

210. Pudding a la Girot.— Place a saucepan on the stove with 1-1/2 pints sweet cream, the yolks of 6 eggs, 4 tablespoonfuls sugar and 1 teaspoonful vanilla essence; stir this over the fire till nearly boiling, remove the cream and set aside to cool; then add 1-1/2 ounces dissolved gelatine; soak 1/4 pound lady fingers and 1/4 pound macaroons in cherry wine; then place a tin pudding form with tube in the center into cracked ice, put in a few spoonfuls cream and let it get firm; put over this some of the soaked lady fingers and macaroons and over them some preserved pineapple or cherries; over this put cream, fruit and cake; continue in this way until all is used; let the last layer be cream; close the form and pack it in cracked ice, where it should remain 2 hours; when ready to serve turn the pudding onto a round dish, fill the opening in center with whipped cream flavored with vanilla and garnish the edge of dish with preserved fruit.

211. Chocolate Pudding a la Hollandaise.— Boil 1/4 pound Baker's grated chocolate in 1/2 pint water, add 1/2 pint sugar and 1 teaspoonful extract of vanilla; when cold add 1-1/2 ounces gelatine which has been soaked in 1/2 pint cold water and dissolved in 1/2 pint hot water; set the chocolate mixture into cracked ice and stir till it begins to thicken; then add 1 pint whipped cream; if not sweet enough add a little more sugar; set a tin pudding form with a tube in the center into cracked ice, pour in some clear fruit or wine jelly (see Jelly) and let it get firm; decorate the bottom with blanched almonds; take pieces of almonds up with a larding needle, dip them into jelly and lay in a pointed border close to the edge; pour over a little more jelly; in the meantime soak 20 vanilla wafers and macaroons in sweet cream; when the jelly in form is firm put in a layer of wafers and macaroons; put over this a layer of the chocolate cream; as soon as the cream is firm put in the remaining wafers and macaroons and lastly the remaining cream; let the pudding remain on ice for about 3 hours; when ready to serve dip the form into hot water, turn the pudding onto a round dish and lay a border of whipped cream flavored with extract of vanilla around it; fill the opening in center with whipped cream.

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