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Fairy's Album - With Rhymes of Fairyland
Author: Anonymous
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FAIRY'S ALBUM

COPYRIGHT,

O. M. DUNHAM 1884

CASSELL & COMPANY, LIMITED, LONDON, PARIS & NEW YORK.



FAIRY'S ALBUM

With Rhymes of Fairyland.



CASSELL & COMPANY, LIMITED:

London, Paris & New York



CONTENTS.

FAIRY'S ALBUM 7

THE OLD WOMAN WHO LIVED IN A SHOE 13

FAIRY'S FRIENDS 26

PEACE AND WAR 51

FAIRY'S DREAM 56



FAIRY'S ALBUM.



THIS IS FAIRY'S ALBUM.

This is Fairy, bright as Spring, Loving every living thing With a love so sweet and true, That all creatures love her too! This is Fairy, bright as Spring, IN FAIRY'S ALBUM.



This is Fairy, wondrous wise, Sunshine laughing in her eyes, Who will prattle on for hours To the brooks and trees and flowers, To the birds and butterflies, To all creatures 'neath the skies, Understanding all they say In a curious sort of way! This is Fairy, wondrous wise, IN FAIRY'S ALBUM.



This is Fairy Fanciful, Never moping, never dull, For her mind is amply stored With an overflowing hoard Of the tales of fairy times, And of quaint old nursery rhymes, So that she can always find Good companions when inclined! This is Fairy Fanciful, IN FAIRY'S ALBUM.



THE OLD WOMAN WHO LIVED IN A SHOE.

This is a rhyme Of ancient time Of a certain old woman who lived in a shoe, And had so many children she didn't know what to do: Fairy knows her, and says it's true.



This is the shoe. And this is the dame Without a name, WHO LIVED IN THE SHOE.



These are the children, quite a score— Perhaps one less, perhaps one more— Who worried the dame without a name, WHO LIVED IN THE SHOE.



This is the broth so weak and thin, With never a bit of bread therein, Made for the children, quite a score— Perhaps one less, perhaps one more— Who worried the dame without a name, WHO LIVED IN THE SHOE.



This is the stick so long and thick, That followed the broth so weak and thin, With never a bit of bread therein, Made for the children, quite a score— Perhaps one less, perhaps one more— Who worried the dame without a name, WHO LIVED IN THE SHOE.

This is the bed within the shoe, That the children got in, two by two, Urged by the stick so long and thick, That followed the broth so weak and thin, With never a bit of bread therein, Made for the children, quite a score—



Perhaps one less, perhaps one more— Who worried the dame without a name, WHO LIVED IN THE SHOE.

And this is the end of a tale that is true, Of a wonderful bed in a wonderful shoe, That the children got in, two by two, Urged by the stick so long and thick, That followed the broth so weak and thin, With never a bit of bread therein, Made for the children, quite a score— Perhaps one less, perhaps one more— Who worried the dame without a name, WHO LIVED IN THE SHOE.



FAIRY'S FRIENDS.

These are some of FAIRY'S FRIENDS.



This is little Miss Bo-Peep, She who often lost her sheep, Went home weeping sore, and found All her flock there safe and sound! This is little Miss Bo-Peep— ONE OF FAIRY'S FRIENDS.



This is Jack, and this is Jill, Who went forth their pail to fill, And came tumbling down the hill! Fairy says they do it still, This strange couple—Jack and Jill— AND THEY'RE FAIRY'S FRIENDS.

This is lazy young Boy-Blue, Dull in all he had to do: Often Fairy and Bo-Peep Found him lying fast asleep, Heedless of his cows and sheep! This is lazy young Boy-Blue— ONE OF FAIRY'S FRIENDS.



This is wonderful Dame Hubbard— Name that always rhymes with cupboard— Ever going out to buy Something for her dog so sly, Who would oft her patience try! This is wonderful Dame Hubbard— ONE OF FAIRY'S FRIENDS.

This is Master Simple Simon: Every day he meets a pie-man; Every day, so runs the tale, He will try to catch a whale, Fishing in his mother's pail! This is Master Simple Simon— ONE OF FAIRY'S FRIENDS.



This is Puss-in-Boots, so clever, In all dangers ready ever, In his labours failing never: Puss-in-Boots, who has a name Noted on the rolls of Fame! This is Puss-in-Boots, so clever— ONE OF FAIRY'S FRIENDS.



This is Giant-killing Jack, With his bugle on his back, With his sword so keen and bright, Ready ever foes to smite! This is Giant-killing Jack— ONE OF FAIRY'S FRIENDS.

This, too, is that other Jack— He who, fearless of attack, Dared the magic stalk to climb, Facing giants many a time! This is Master Bean-stalk Jack— ONE OF FAIRY'S FRIENDS.



This is just a little gnome, One of those that make their home In the mines beneath the ground Where the precious gold is found! This is just a little gnome— ONE OF FAIRY'S FRIENDS.



This is Master Johnnie Horner, Sitting crying in a corner; Many stop and ask him why, And to all he makes reply, "'Cause no plums are in the pie!" This is selfish Johnnie Horner— WORST OF FAIRY'S FRIENDS.



This is Cinderella sweet, With her slippers on her feet: Cinderella at the ball, Cinderella loved by all! This is Cinderella sweet— BEST OF FAIRY'S FRIENDS.

This is where the story ends Of Miss Fairy's many friends: Others—fairies, gnomes, and elves— You can think of for yourselves! This is where the story ends OF FAIRY'S FRIENDS.



PEACE AND WAR.

Fairy, when she was not dreaming, Fairy, when she was not scheming Wondrous tales of gnome and elf, Oft drew pictures for herself, Fanciful as they could be: Two are here for you to see.

This is Peace: a little maiden Who has gleaned all through the day, Going home with arms well laden, When the sunlight fades away.



This is War: a baby brother Threatened by a wasp that stings, Getting ready soon to smother That fierce yellow thing with wings.



FAIRY'S DREAM

Fairy fell asleep one day With her album in her hand, And she dreamt she lost her way On the edge of Fairyland.

There she met a little man. Quaintly dressed, with cap and bells:



"Read," he said, "Miss, if you can, All the words the sign-post tells.

"Though your album you may fill With our portraits, understand Hundreds more await you still Here in wondrous Fairyland."

THE END

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