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Lady Cadogan's Illustrated Games of Solitaire or Patience - New Revised Edition, including American Games
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LADY CADOGAN'S

Illustrated Games of Solitaire or Patience



NEW REVISED EDITION

INCLUDING American Games



"How poor are they that have not patience."—OTHELLO.

Patientia vincit.



PHILADELPHIA DAVID McKAY COMPANY Washington Square

Copyright, 1914, by DAVID MCKAY COMPANY

Printed in United States of America



[Transcriber's Note: This alphabetical list of the games was produced for the convenience of the reader and is not contained in the original text.]

CONTENTS

ANNA THE FIFTEEN BABETTE THE FISH-BONE CAESAR THE FLOWER-GARDEN CANFIELD OR KLONDIKE THE FOUR CORNERS FORTRESS THE FOURTEENTH GENERAL SEDGEWICK THE GREAT THIRTEEN LA BELLE LUCIE THE HEMISPHERES LA NIVERNAISE THE HERRING-BONE LIGHT AND SHADE THE KINGS MARGARETHE THE LABYRINTH MOUNT OLYMPUS THE "LOUIS" PATIENCE NAPOLEON AT ST. HELENA THE MILL NAPOLEON'S SQUARE THE NATION NESTOR THE OLGA RED AND BLACK THE QUEENS SLY THE SALIC LAW SPENSER'S FAIRIE QUEEN THE SHAH THE BESIEGED CITY THE SQUARE THE BLOCKADE THE SULTAN THE CARPET THE TERRACE THE CLOCK THE WHEEL THE CONGRESS THE ZODIAC THE CONSTITUTION TWO RINGS THE EMPRESS OF INDIA



EXPLANATION OF THE TABLEAUX

The blank spaces show where the foundation cards should be played during the deal.

EXPLANATION OF TERMS

Available cards. Those that are not "blocked" by other cards, i.e., not forbidden by the particular rules of each game, to be used.

Released cards. Those which, by the removal of the cards that blocked them, have now become available.

Suitable cards. Those whose value and suit fit them to be played or placed in the tableaux.

Foundation cards. Those on which the Patience is formed. These are generally aces and kings.

Marriage. The placing a card of the same suit on the next one above or below it in value. Any number may be placed on each other in this way.

Sequence. The regular succession of cards ascending from ace to king, or descending from king to ace; a sequence need not be of one suit.

Value. The figures of the court cards, and the number of points of the minor ones.

Suit. Either hearts, spades, diamonds, or clubs.

Lane. An empty space in the tableau, which has been formed by the removal of an entire row of cards.

Talon. Cards which, being unsuitable at the moment, are laid aside in one or more packets till they can come into use.

To play cards. The placing them on the foundations in contradistinction to placing them elsewhere.

Re-deals. These are always in addition to the original deal.



LA BELLE LUCIE

One Entire Pack of Cards

RULES

I. The uppermost card of each packet is alone available, until by its removal it releases the one beneath.

II. The foundations must follow suit.

PLAY

Deal out the entire pack in packets of three cards dealt together and placed as in tableau. The last packet, however, will contain but one card.

The four aces form the foundation cards, and are to ascend in sequence to kings.

Having placed the tableau, take any aces that may appear on the surface of the packets and play them in their allotted spaces, and upon them any other suitable cards, subject to Rule I.

When all available cards have been played, you proceed to release others, by forming marriages in a descending line on the tableau; but great care is requisite, lest in releasing one card another still more necessary to success should be blocked. The whole tableau should be carefully examined, and the combinations arranged so as to release the greatest number of suitable cards.

When this has been done, and there are no more available cards to play, the entire tableau may be taken up, shuffled and re-dealt (if necessary twice), then played again as before.

This game can also be played with two packs, the eight aces forming the foundation cards, and double the number of packets being dealt for the tableau. It is then called "THE HOUSE IN THE WOOD."

There is also another way of playing it with two packs. The foundation cards to be four aces, and four kings of different suits, and marriages made both in ascending and descending lines. The name of this game is "THE HOUSE ON THE HILL."



NAPOLEON AT ST. HELENA

Two Entire Packs of Cards

RULES

I. Only cards in the lowest row are available, until a card in any other row is released by the removal of those below it, the principle being that no card can be used that has another below it.

II. The foundations must follow suit.

PLAY

Deal out from left to right four rows of ten cards.

The eight aces, when they can be placed, form the foundation cards, and are to ascend in sequence to kings.

Should any aces appear in the lowest row, play them in their allotted spaces, and upon them any suitable cards to continue the foundations (Rule I).

You must now examine the tableau and endeavor by forming marriages (in descending line, and always subject to Rule I) to release other suitable cards. This, however, must be done with care, lest a sequence in a lower row may block a card above it which is much wanted, and might soon have been released.

If by these changes you can make a vacancy in the uppermost row (thus forming a perpendicular lane), it is of the greatest use. The vacancy may be refilled with any available card from the tableau or from the talon, but you are not obliged to refill it until a favorable opportunity occurs.

Note.—Some players only allow the vacancy to be filled from the talon.

The card so placed has all the privileges of the original card whose place it fills, and is treated in the same manner.

When there are no more available cards to play, proceed to deal out the remainder of the pack, turning the cards one by one, playing all suitable ones on the foundations, or placing them on the sequences of the tableau. The cards that cannot be so employed are laid aside in one packet, forming the talon.

There is no re-deal.



THE FIFTEEN

Two Entire Packs of Cards

RULES

I. Only cards in the seventh or lowest row are available, until by their removal those above them are released. No card can at any time be used that has any other below it.

Note.—There is one exception to this rule, in case the game cannot be opened. See below.

II. Each foundation must follow suit.

PLAY

Deal out the entire pack from left to right in horizontal rows, fifteen cards in each, excepting the last one, which can only contain fourteen. Each row should partly cover over the preceding one; four aces and four kings form the foundation cards, the aces ascending in sequence to kings, the kings descending in sequence to aces. When the deal is complete, if any foundation cards should appear in the lowest row (Rule I), play them at once on the spaces reserved, and also any other suitable cards—then marry, both in ascending and in descending lines, subject to Rule I; but if, after these changes, no foundation card is available, so that the patience cannot even begin, you may withdraw from the sixth row one ace and one king, if any are to be found (see note to Rule I), immediately filling the spaces so made with the cards below which had previously blocked them. If even this resource is unavailing, the patience has already failed, there being no re-deal, and no further infringement of rules allowed.

When one or more foundations are established, examine the tableau carefully, marry all available cards, and endeavor by these changes to release the greatest number of suitable cards for the foundations, and to open out one or more perpendicular lanes. These are of the greatest use; you may select any available card and place it at the top of the lane, and below it any others in sequence of the same suit, each card partly concealing the preceding one, as in the original deal.

You may also use the lane for reversing any sequences previously made. Thus, supposing there is a sequence beginning with a ten and ending with a three (the ten being required for one of the foundations), place the three at the top of the lane, the other cards following until the ten becomes the lowest or available card.

In theory this patience is simple, but it is very difficult to play. The combinations are endless, from the constant reversing of sequences, and require great attention. As the success principally depends on the lanes, it is more prudent, when you have only one, not to refill it until by some fresh combination you can open out another one.

There is no re-deal.



THE SALIC LAW

Two Entire Packs of Cards

RULES

I. Only the cards on the surface of the king packets are available, until their removal as usual releases those beneath, but all the cards in each packet may be examined.

II. The foundations do not follow suit.

PLAY

Take from the pack and place one king to begin the line of eight kings, that are to be successively placed in a horizontal row as they appear in the deal. On this first king you place all the cards as you deal them until the next king appears. You now place the cards as you deal them upon this second king, and you continue thus to deal out the whole pack, always heaping upon the last king that has appeared all the cards as they are dealt.

The eight aces are to form the foundation cards, and are to ascend in sequence to knaves (Rule II). When in the course of the deal any aces appear, they are to be immediately placed in a line above the king packets, and upon them any suitable cards (Rule I), and when the queens appear they are to be placed in a row above the foundations. The queens are merely placed to complete the final tableau, which, if the patience succeeds, consists of the eight queens above, the eight knaves finishing the foundations in the centre, and the eight kings below. You must continually examine the surface of the king packets to play any suitable cards on the foundations, and in so doing endeavor to free some of the kings entirely, for when the deal is ended you are allowed to place one card from any of the other packets (Rule I) on each king, and you must, of course, choose those cards that will release the greatest number of suitable cards for the foundations, for which purpose the whole packets may be examined. In this consists the entire play.

There is no re-deal.



THE FOUR CORNERS

Two Entire Packs of Cards

RULES

I. After the deal is completed, the uppermost card of each packet is available and may be placed on any of the foundations, the cards underneath being released as usual by the removal of those that covered them.

II. Each foundation must follow suit.

PLAY

Deal out twelve cards as in tableau, beginning on the left. Place the top corner card, then the four side cards, lastly the lower corner card; repeat this process on the right hand, beginning with the top corner, and leaving space in the centre for the foundation cards. These will consist of four aces and four kings of different suits, the aces ascending in sequence to kings, and the kings descending in sequence to aces.

Having dealt the first round of twelve cards, proceed to deal out the entire pack in successive rounds covering the first one, but in dealing each several round the following method must be strictly observed:

The eight foundation cards, as they appear in the deal (whether they fall on the corner or on the side packets), are to be at once played in the space reserved for them, and on these may be played any suitable cards which in dealing fall on either of the four corner packets; but when a card (otherwise suitable) falls on either of the side packets, it may not be played unless the foundation to which it belongs happens to be the one immediately adjoining the side packet on which that card fell in dealing.

Note.—Whenever in dealing a card is withdrawn, to place on one of the foundations, the next card in the pack is placed in its stead.

After the entire deal is completed these restrictions cease, all suitable cards may now be played, subject to Rule I, and marriages, both in ascending and descending lines, may be made with cards on the surface of the twelve packets; great care must, however, be taken in making these marriages, lest in releasing one card you block another that is equally required. The contents of each packet should be carefully examined, and only those marriages made which release the greatest number of suitable cards.

Note.—The sequences thus made may be reversed if required, viz., if one of the packets contained a sequence, beginning with deuce and ascending to eight (this being, of course, the top card), and one of the other packets had at the top a nine of the same suit, the eight might be placed on the nine, the rest of the sequence following, till the deuce became the top (or available) card.

When all possible combinations have been made, and further progress is impossible, the twelve packets may be taken up in order, beginning on the left, re-dealt, and played exactly as before. If necessary, there may be two re-deals.



THE MILL

Two Entire Packs of Cards

RULES

I. All cards in the wings are available.

II. The five foundations do not follow suit.

PLAY

Take from the pack one ace and place it in the centre before you; next deal out eight cards, grouping them round the ace to represent the wings of a windmill. The first four kings that appear in dealing are to be played in the four angles (see tableau). These, with the centre ace, form the five foundation cards. Each of the four kings is to descend in sequence to ace, while upon the centre ace four entire families are to be piled in sequences (Rule II).

Having placed the centre ace and the wings, take from the latter any kings for the foundations, or other suitable cards to play on them, or on the centre ace, filling up the spaces so made from the cards in your hand. Then proceed to deal out the remaining cards, turning them one by one, playing all whose value admit of it on the foundations. The cards that cannot be so used are placed aside in one packet, forming the talon.

Note.—The four families on the centre ace each begin with ace and end with king.

It is better to play cards from the talon rather than from the wings.

Vacancies in the wings must be immediately refilled from the pack or talon.

In forming the foundations, the uppermost card of either of the king packets may be transferred, if suitable, to the ace packet; but this privilege is limited to one card of each at a time, and may only be resorted to when the playing of that card would bring into immediate use any other available card of the wings or of the talon.

There is no re-deal.



THE SHAH

Two Entire Packs of Cards

RULES

I. During the deal cards in each circle of the star are available until another circle blocks them. After the deal is completed only cards in the third (or outer) circle are available until, as usual, their removal releases the inner circles.

II. Marriages are limited to cards in the third circle; cards in the inner circles, even when released, can only be played, but not married.

III. The foundations must follow suit.

PLAY

Take from the pack the eight aces and the eight kings. Throw aside seven of the kings and place the remaining one in the centre, with the eight aces surrounding it in a circle.

The king is called The Shah, and remains alone. The aces are the foundation cards, and are to ascend in sequence to queens.

Next deal out a circle of eight cards, beginning at the top and continuing from left to right. If any of these are suitable, play them, filling the spaces at once from the cards in your hand. Then deal out a second circle, blocking the first one (Rule I), and treat it in the same manner, then a third circle, which completes the rays of the star.

Note.—In the pattern tableau the third circle is omitted for want of space.

You should now examine the star, to see if there are any available cards which it would be advantageous to marry, or to play (Rules I and II), but you are not obliged to do either until a favorable opportunity occurs. Marriages can only be made in descending line.

Note.—It is often better to wait until, in dealing, a card turns up likely to be soon required, and then, by playing or marrying, you make a vacant space in which to place it.

When you have played or married all the cards you wish, the spaces so made must be refilled from the talon or pack, beginning with the inner circles, and proceeding from left to right as before.

The remaining cards are dealt out in the usual way, those not required for the foundations, or for marrying, or for refilling spaces forming the talon.

When a lane, i.e., one entire ray of the star, is opened out, the place of the inner card may be filled by one card from the third circle. This is sometimes of great use, and is a kind of "grace," as this patience seldom succeeds. The other two spaces are refilled from the talon, and this must be done at once, as each ray must always be complete.

There is no re-deal.



THE BLOCKADE

Two Entire Packs of Cards

RULES

I. All cards in the first row are available, but as each row is placed it blocks the preceding one.

The removal of any card in the lower rows releases the one immediately above it, the principle being that all cards are available that have no others below them.

II. The foundations must follow suit.

PLAY

Deal out twelve cards in a horizontal line. Aces may be played as they appear, but no other card can be played until the row is complete. The eight aces are the foundation cards, and are to ascend in sequence to kings.

When the first line is placed, play any suitable cards, and then marry in descending line, but be careful to place the cards exactly over each other, to avoid confusion. The vacancies thus caused must be immediately refilled from the pack, then again play and marry. When neither can be done, deal out another row underneath the first, and, when it is complete, play, marry, and refill spaces as before.

You continue to deal out successive rows until the pack is exhausted, always pausing between each row to play, marry, and refill spaces.

In the course of the game vacancies will often be made in the higher rows. These must always be refilled first.

There is no re-deal.



THE CLOCK

Two Entire Packs of Cards

RULES

I. When the circle is formed, the uppermost cards of each packet are available, and their removal releases as usual those beneath.

II. Marriages can only be made with cards in the circle, and not with those from the pack or talon.

III. Vacancies in the circle must be refilled with cards from the pack, but not from the talon; each packet must be refilled so as to contain not less than three cards.

IV. The twelve foundations must follow suit.

PLAY

Withdraw from the pack the twelve cards, as in Tableau No. 1, and place them in their exact order against the hours of the clock represented. These are the foundation cards, and are to ascend in sequence until each packet attains the hour of the clock against which it is placed.

Having placed these twelve foundations, proceed to deal out a circle consisting of twelve packets of three cards dealt together—so spread that each card is visible (see dotted line). From this circle you first play all suitable cards (Rule I), and then marry in a descending line (Rule II), and then refill spaces (Rule III). This last should be done in order, from left to right, beginning at the numeral I, and all the packets refilled before proceeding again to play or to marry.

Note.—Although each packet must never contain less than the original number of three cards, they will often, by marriages, contain more.

You are not obliged to play cards which would be more useful if left on the circle.

When all further progress is at an end, deal out the remaining cards; play all suitable ones, then marry and refill spaces, but be careful not to infringe Rule II.

The cards that cannot be so employed are laid aside in one packet, forming the talon, which can only be used to play on the foundations.

There is no re-deal.



FORTRESS

One Entire Pack of Cards

RULES

I. Only the outside cards of each group are available, until by their removal the next ones are released, the principle being that no card can be used that has another outside it.

Note.—By "outside" is meant the cards on the right side of the right-hand group, and those on the left side of the left-hand group.

II. The foundations must follow suit.

PLAY

Deal out the entire pack horizontally in two groups, as in tableau, beginning at the left hand, and dealing straight across each group, leaving space in the centre for four aces. These, when they can be played, form the foundation cards, and are to descend in sequence to kings.

Should any aces appear on the outside of either group, play them, as also any other suitable cards for continuing the foundations (Rules I and II).

You next proceed to form marriages, both in ascending and in descending lines, with cards on the outside of both groups (Rule I). But this must be done with extreme care, so as not only to release the greatest number of suitable cards, but also, if possible, to open out one entire horizontal row of cards to form a lane. The success of the game entirely depends on these lanes. If, therefore, you succeed in opening out one, it is more prudent not to refill it until, by some fresh combination, others can be made.

When a lane is to be refilled, select any available card (Rule I), and place it at the inner end of the lane, and along it any others in sequence of the same suit, the last card being, of course, the available one.

One great use of these lanes is to reverse any sequences that have been made by marriages in the ascending line.

Note.—Supposing you have placed upon a deuce a sequence ending with eight; place the eight at the inner end of the lane, the other cards following in succession until the deuce becomes the outside card. When there are more cards in the lane than the original number, they can be placed partly over each other.

There is no re-deal.



THE FOURTEENTH

Two Entire Packs of Cards

PLAY

Deal out twenty-five cards in five rows, each containing five cards. The object is to compose the number fourteen with any two cards taken either from a perpendicular or from a horizontal row. The knave counts eleven, the queen twelve, and the king thirteen.

The cards so paired are withdrawn, and their places filled by the cards in your hand.

If in the course of the game the number fourteen cannot be composed, one chance remains—any two cards may be taken from their proper position, and may change places with any other two cards; and it is only in making this exchange, so as to produce one or more fourteens, that the player has any control over the success of the game, the success consisting of the entire pack being paired off. In the tableau three fourteens could be at once composed: The ten of hearts with the four of clubs, the knave of spades with the three of hearts, the eight of diamonds with the six of spades.



THE SULTAN

Two Entire Packs of Cards

RULE

The foundations must follow suit.

PLAY

Withdraw from the pack and place the eight kings and one ace of hearts as in tableau.

The centre king of hearts is called the Sultan, and remains alone. The other seven kings, with the ace of hearts, form the foundation cards. Each of these seven kings begins with ace, and ascends in sequence to queen. The ace of hearts ascends in the same manner, so that all the eight packets surrounding the Sultan end with queens.

You next deal out eight cards, four on either side (see tableau). These constitute the Divan. From this Divan you can play any suitable cards on the foundations, and, having done so, proceed to deal out the remainder of the pack, turning the cards one by one, those that are not suitable for the foundations being laid aside in one packet, forming the talon. Vacancies in the Divan must be immediately refilled from the talon, or, when there is no talon, from the pack.

The talon may be taken up, shuffled, and re-dealt, if necessary, twice.



LA NIVERNAISE

Two Entire Packs of Cards

RULES

I. The Line is to consist of six packets, of which the uppermost card of each is alone available, until by its removal the one beneath is released—the card which is uppermost at the time being always the available one.

II. As many cards in each of the packets forming the Line may be examined as there are vacancies in the Flanks.

III. All foundations must follow suit.

IV. In re-dealing, the Line packets must be taken up in succession, beginning on the left; then the whole together turned and re-dealt as before.

PLAY

Place two perpendicular rows of four cards each, called Flanks, leaving space in the centre for four aces and four kings of different suits. These, when they can be played, form the foundation cards, the kings descending in sequence to aces, the aces ascending in sequence to kings.

You next deal from left to right six packets, each composed of four cards dealt together, and placed in a horizontal line underneath. These packets are called the Line, and will receive successive additions.

If any of the foundation cards appear on the surface of the Line, or on the Flanks, play them in the spaces reserved; as also any other suitable cards subject to Rule I, taking, however, in preference, cards from the Flanks, as the vacancies so made are most important.

Note.—So necessary to success are these vacancies that if, after dealing the first round of the Line, none have been made, it is scarcely worth while to continue the game.

They may be filled from the pack or from the Line, but it is never prudent to fill up all vacancies; one at least should be left.

Single cards are not to be replaced on the Line; but if an entire packet has been played off, four more cards are to be immediately placed in its stead, and this rule applies to each several round.

When the resources thus far are exhausted, deal a second round of four cards together, on each of the Line packets as before, and continue thus to deal successive rounds until all the cards are dealt out, but between each round pause and examine the Line (Rule II) and the Flanks, and play all available cards.

The whole of the pack having been dealt, and further progress at an end, take up the line as prescribed in Rule IV, re-deal, and play exactly as at first.

There is only one re-deal.

In forming the foundations, one card at a time may be exchanged from the ascending to the descending sequences, and vice versa.



THE EMPRESS OF INDIA

Four Entire Packs of Cards

RULES

I. All cards in the Army and Navy are equally available if played in pairs (i.e., one black and one red), but no card of either color can be played on a foundation unless a card of the other color is played at the same time on another foundation.

II. Vacancies in the Army and Navy must be immediately refilled with cards of their own color from the talon, or, when there is no talon, from the pack.

III. Cards from the pack or talon cannot be played at once, but must first pass through the Army or Navy.

IV. The talon consists of two packets, one of red, the other of black, cards.

V. The foundations must follow suit.

PLAY

Withdraw from the pack the eight black aces and the eight black queens, the eight red kings, and the eight red knaves.

Place these cards as in the tableau, throwing aside the four queens of spades and three queens of clubs.

The remaining queen of clubs represents the Empress; the knaves, the guard of British soldiers, and these nine cards remain alone.

The eight black aces and the eight red kings are the foundation cards, the aces ascending in sequence to kings, representing Admirals, the kings descending in sequence to aces, representing Generals.

Note.—The red sequences must omit knaves, the black ones must omit queens.

Deal out four horizontal rows, each containing twelve cards, of which the two upper rows are to be red (the Army), the two lower ones black (the Navy).

They are to be dealt at the same time, and if after the two rows of one color, say red, are finished, more red cards turn up, they must be laid aside as a talon (Rule IV).

When the Army and Navy are complete, if any available pairs of cards have been dealt (Rule I), play them (the first pair must, of course, be a black two and a red queen), and refill the spaces; but if there should be none, you may proceed to pair cards. Any card in the Army may be placed on any card in the Navy, and vice versa, but the cards so paired cannot afterwards be separated, but must be played at the same time on their respective foundations. The vacancies thus made must be immediately refilled (Rule II).

Each card can only be paired once.

You may choose your own time for pairing cards. For instance, if you require, say, a ten of clubs for one of the foundations, you may defer making a vacancy in the Navy until the ten of clubs is at the top of the talon. When you have played all available cards, deal out the remainder of the pack, those not required to fill vacancies being placed in two packets (Rule IV).

There is no re-deal.

Note.—The Army and Navy could not be placed in the tableau from want of space.



THE BESIEGED CITY

Two Entire Packs of Cards

RULES

I. The foundations are formed with cards from the Ramparts and from the pack. Cards from the talon must pass through the Reserve, and the Reserve must pass into the Ramparts before they can be played.

II. Cards in the Ramparts may be placed on each other either in the usual ascending and descending sequences, or in the order in which they will be played, viz., queen on two, knave on three, and so on, or vice versa. They must be of the same suit; and sequences, both in ascending and in descending lines, may be placed in the same packet.

Cards in the Ramparts may be transferred from one packet to another at discretion (the top card of each being alone available), and they must follow suit.

III. Cards in the Reserve may in the same way be placed on those in the Ramparts, but only on the cards at the ends or sides of the line from which they are taken.

Note.—In the tableau the four of clubs could only be placed on cards at A, B, C, or D, and in this case only on D.

IV. Vacancies in the Ramparts are filled from the Reserve with any card in the row at the end of which the vacancy occurs.

Note.—In the tableau a vacancy at B or D could only be filled by the four or ace of clubs, or by the seven or six of spades; and a vacancy at A or C, by the ace of diamonds or by the three or four of clubs.

V. Vacancies in the Reserve are filled from the talon or, when there is no talon, from the pack.

VI. The foundations must follow suit.

PLAY

Deal twelve cards in four rows of three cards each. Then deal an outside row of fourteen cards placed crossways. These are the "Ramparts." The inside twelve cards are the "Reserve."

The foundation cards are four aces of different suits. On these are placed kings, then deuces, queens, threes, and so on, each foundation consisting of alternate sequences, ascending and descending, and finishing as well as beginning with aces (Rule VI).

Having placed the tableau, take from the Ramparts aces or other suitable cards (if any have been dealt), and play them in their allotted places, immediately filling each vacancy as it occurs (Rules IV and V); this must be done throughout the game. Then transfer cards in the Ramparts, and from the Reserve, as directed in Rules II and III.

When you have done all that you wished (for it is optional), and again played if you can, deal out the remainder of the pack, the cards not suitable for the foundations being placed in a talon.

At the end of the patience, when the talon is exhausted and all the cards have been dealt, should there still be cards in the Reserve which cannot be transferred to the Ramparts, you may transpose them to effect this if you can.

This patience is exceedingly difficult.



THE FLOWER-GARDEN

One Entire Pack of Cards

RULES

I. Any card in the Bouquet and the uppermost cards of the Garden are available. The removal of the top cards releases those beneath.

II. The foundations must follow suit.

III. Cards placed in sequence on the Garden need not follow suit.

PLAY

Deal six packets of six cards dealt together, and so spread that all are visible. The four aces are the foundation cards, and are to ascend in sequence to kings (Rule II).

Sixteen cards will remain, which are called the Bouquet, and must be kept in the hand. Take from the Bouquet and from the Garden any aces or other suitable cards (Rule I) and play them.

Next place cards in descending sequences in the Garden, transferring them from one packet to another as often as you please (Rules I and III), and you may place cards from the Bouquet in the same way. For example, place the four of diamonds (see tableau) on the five of clubs, then take the ten of hearts from the Bouquet and place it on the knave of diamonds. The nine of clubs can now be transferred, and the ace and deuce of diamonds are released.

This patience is exceedingly difficult. Cards taken from the Bouquet cannot be returned to it, and there is only one deal. The greatest care must, therefore, be taken in placing cards in sequence and in playing them. You are not obliged to do either, and it is often better to leave a card than to play it, as it may be useful in releasing others.

When an entire packet is cleared off, you may begin a new one with a card from the Bouquet or from the Garden (Rule I), and this is often the only means of removing a king, which, being the highest card, can never be transferred.



THE HEMISPHERES

Two Entire Packs of Cards

RULES

I. Only cards that belong to their proper hemisphere are available.

II. Cards of the wrong colors may be exchanged into their proper hemispheres whenever the opportunity occurs, and at the end of the game, when all the cards are dealt and the talon is exhausted, they may be transferred without an exchange.

III. Cards may only marry those belonging to their own Race, but cards from the talon may marry those of any Race.

IV. The barriers cannot be moved till the end of the game, when they are played to complete the foundations.

V. All the foundations must follow suit.

PLAY

Take from the pack and place as in tableau the four red aces and the four black kings.

Then place crossways a king of hearts and a king of diamonds, an ace of clubs and an ace of spades. The four latter cards are called barriers, and divide each Race.

The four black kings and the four red aces form the foundation cards, the aces ascending in sequence to kings, the kings descending in sequence to aces.

The red cards, representing Europeans and Asiatics, should inhabit the northern hemisphere; the black cards, representing Australians and Africans, the southern; but it is obvious that, in dealing and refilling vacancies, cards will often be found in the wrong hemispheres, and while there they cannot be used in any way.

Having placed the foundations and the barriers, deal out (from left to right, beginning from the king of hearts) a circle consisting of three cards between each barrier. These represent the four Races. From these Races you play, marry, and exchange all available cards subject to Rules I, II, III, and V.

Note.—The red suits marry in descending line; the black, in ascending line.

This done, you deal out the remainder of the pack, first refilling vacancies in the Races (proceeding from left to right, as in the original deal) and then playing all suitable cards. The rest form the talon, from which cards may marry those in the circle, subject to Rules I and III.

There is no re-deal.



NAPOLEON'S SQUARE

Two Entire Packs of Cards

RULES

I. Only the uppermost cards of the packets in the square are available until, by their removal, the cards underneath are released, but the whole of the square may be examined.

II. When a vacancy in the square is caused by the removal of an entire packet, the space may be filled by one card from the talon or pack, but this need not be done until a favorable opportunity occurs.

III. All the foundations must follow suit.

PLAY

Deal out twelve packets, each consisting of four cards dealt together, so as to form three sides of a square, leaving space in the centre for the eight aces. These are the foundation cards, and are to ascend in sequence to kings.

If any aces appear on the surface of the square, play them in their allotted places, as also any other suitable cards.

You next proceed to form marriages in a descending line with the cards of the square, subject to Rule I. As usual, great judgment must be exercised in making these changes, lest cards underneath should be blocked by a sequence of higher cards of the same suit. If this were to occur in two packets, i.e., if in both cases sequences, say, of diamonds blocked lower cards of the same suit, success would be impossible.

Note.—If after dealing the square two kings of one suit were found to be blocking two smaller cards of that suit, either the whole must be taken up and re-dealt, or one king must be slipped underneath.

You now proceed to play out the rest of the cards, those that are not suitable for the foundations or for the sequences of the square being placed in a talon.

There is no re-deal.

This game may be also played as follows:

Deal out a square of twelve single cards, then deal the rest of the pack as usual, the cards that are suitable being played on the foundations or married (in descending line) to those on the square, ready to be transferred to the foundations, the rest placed in a talon, and vacancies filled in the usual manner.



THE CONSTITUTION

Two Entire Packs of Cards

RULES

I. The foundations are formed exclusively from the "Privy Council." All cards in the other divisions, pack, or talon must ascend through each division till they reach the top before they can be played.

II. Cards in the three lower divisions may be placed in sequence on cards in the next division above them, and in this manner they may be transferred from one division to another till they reach the top.

III. When cards are placed in sequence in the "Constitution," the top card only of each sequence is available until its removal releases the one beneath.

IV. All sequences must be of alternate colors and in descending line—i.e., a red nine on a black ten, then a black eight, a red seven, and so on. Any number of cards may be so placed.

V. Each vacancy must be at once filled by a card from the division immediately below it; and as this rule applies equally to all the rows, a vacancy will thus be caused in the lowest row or "People," which must be filled from the talon, or, when there is no talon, from the pack.

VI. The foundations must follow suit.

PLAY

Take from the pack the kings, queens, and aces—seven of the queens are to be thrown aside and the other cards placed as in tableau.

The queen of diamonds represents THE SOVEREIGN; the black kings, the Bishops; the red kings, the Judges.

The eight aces form the foundation cards or "Government," and ascend in sequence to knaves.

Deal out four horizontal rows (beginning with the lowest), each containing eight cards.

This forms the "Constitution." Each row represents a separate division.

The first (or lowest row) is the "People"; the second, the "House of Commons"; the third, the "House of Lords"; the last the "Privy Council."

When the tableau is complete, if any suitable cards are to be found in the "Privy Council" row, play them (Rule I), immediately refilling each vacancy as it is made (Rule V).

You must then examine the Constitution to see which cards may be most advantageously placed in sequence (Rules II and IV).

Note.—The success of this game depends chiefly on the play. In filling a vacancy choose the card (Rule V) which has the most chance of reaching the top, or of being useful to cards in the row below it. It is often better to defer making a vacancy till a card turns up in dealing that is required.

When you have played all available cards and placed in sequence all that you wish, deal out the remainder of the pack, the cards not required to fill vacancies in the "People" forming the talon.



THE ZODIAC

Two Entire Packs of Cards

RULES

I. Marriages may be made in the Zodiac with cards from the Equator (but not vice versa) and from the talon or pack, but cards in the Zodiac cannot marry each other, neither can those in the Equator do so. Marriages may be made in ascending and descending lines, and the same packet may contain both.

II. The foundations must follow suit.

PLAY

Deal eight cards in a horizontal row called the "Equator." Then deal a surrounding circle of twenty-four cards called the "Zodiac."

The foundations are not formed till the end of the game. They are to consist of the four aces and four kings of different suits, the aces ascending in sequence to kings, the kings descending in sequence to aces.

Having placed the tableau, you proceed to marry (Rule I) and to refill the spaces from the talon, or, where there is no talon, from the pack, but you are not obliged to do either until a favorable opportunity occurs. You continue to deal out the cards in the usual way, those not required for marrying or for refilling spaces forming the talon. This is to be re-dealt as often as required—that is, until all the cards are placed either in the Zodiac or in the Equator. If this cannot be done, the patience has already failed. If you succeed in placing all the cards, you then begin to form the eight foundations from the Zodiac and Equator (Rule II).

It is obvious that the greatest care is required in marrying the cards, or you will so block them as to be unable to form the foundations.



THE KINGS

Two Entire Packs of Cards

RULES

I. The foundations do not follow suit, neither do the cards placed in sequence on the columns.

II. Only the outside cards of each group of columns are available until, by their removal, the next ones are released, the principle being that no card is available that has another outside it.

Note.—By "outside" is meant the cards on the right side of the right-hand group, and those on the left side of the left-hand group.

III. During the deal no card is available for playing on the foundations unless it is on the same horizontal line as the foundation (of either group) for which it is suitable. When the entire deal is complete, this restriction ceases.

PLAY

Withdraw from the packs the eight aces, and place them in two columns, taking care that each suit is in juxtaposition as in tableau.

The eight aces form the foundations, which ascend in sequence (Rule I) to kings. On either side of the foundations, deal out a column of four cards, and if in dealing these a suitable card turns up, available for a foundation, in accordance with Rule III, play it at once; replacing it with the next card from the pack. You continue to deal out successive columns of four cards, alternately on the right and left of the first ones, until the pack is exhausted, thus forming two groups of columns, with the eight aces in the centre. To avoid confusion, it is best to deal the columns regularly, first on the left, and then on the right, side.

In dealing, never omit to play suitable cards as they turn up, subject to Rule III, for as each column is placed it blocks the preceding one (Rule II), and during the deal you may not play cards from the inner columns, even if released.

When the pack is exhausted, you examine the tableau, and may now play any available cards (Rule II), the restriction as to their being on the same horizontal line having ceased. Sequences (Rule I), both ascending and descending, may now be formed with cards on the outside of both groups (Rule II), and these sequences may be reversed, as they are required to play on the foundations, by transferring them from one packet to another. If an entire horizontal row of cards has been removed, you may place any available card at the inner end of the lane so formed, and sequences may be placed upon it, as on the others.

There is no re-deal.

Note.—It is not perfectly clear from the original whether the restriction mentioned in Rule III ceases when the deal is complete, but, the game being a very difficult one, it is advisable to interpret it in the affirmative.



BABETTE

Two Entire Packs of Cards

RULES

I. The foundations follow suit.

II. Vacancies in the garden are not to be refilled.

III. Each row of cards in the garden blocks the preceding one, but on the removal of cards in the lower rows those above them are released.

PLAY

Deal out eight cards in a horizontal line. This commences what is called the "garden." When the first row is complete, take from it any foundations and place them in the allotted spaces above, and also other suitable cards, but do not refill vacancies (Rule II).

The foundations consist of four aces and four kings of different suits, ascending and descending in the usual sequences (Rule I).

Note.—The tableau is so arranged that one of the king foundations has already descended to queen, and one of the ace foundations has ascended to three. The vacant spaces in the garden show from whence cards have been removed, and not replaced; but there would probably be many more rows in the garden than are shown on the tableau.

You next proceed to deal out successive rows in the garden underneath the first one till the pack is exhausted, strictly observing Rule II.

If there is not room to place each row of the garden below the preceding one, it must be placed so as to half cover it, but in that case, especially if there are many vacancies, the rows of cards are apt to get mixed, so it is best to count from the top, to make sure that you are placing the row you are working on in its proper detached line, and are not partly refilling other rows. You must finish each row before playing from it.

When the garden is laid out, and all available cards have been played (Rule III), take up by itself each perpendicular column, beginning on the left, placing the next column underneath the first, and so on with each column in succession, so that, in turning the pack to re-deal, the last column on the right may be uppermost, thus reversing the order of each row of cards in the next deal.

The garden may be taken up twice and re-dealt exactly in the same manner and observing the same rules.



NESTOR

One Entire Pack of Cards

PLAY

Deal out in horizontal lines six rows each containing eight cards. In dealing these, you must be careful that there should never be two cards of equal value in the same perpendicular line. If, for example, two kings or two fives (the same, of course, applies to all the cards) were to be underneath each other, even though several other cards intervened between them, it would be useless to proceed. You must, therefore, consider the duplicate card as unavailable for the moment and place it at the bottom of the pack in hand, and proceed to deal the next card.

When the tableau is complete, four cards will remain, which are to be placed aside, as a reserve. You then examine the tableau and endeavor to pair the cards, taking only those of the lowest row, until their removal releases those above. When no more can be paired, you have recourse to those of the reserve, taking them up one by one. If the first cannot be paired, put it aside, taking the next, but the card or cards so put aside can be paired afterwards if the opportunity of doing so arises. If all the cards cannot be paired, the game has failed.



LIGHT AND SHADE

Two Entire Packs of Cards

RULES

I. The foundations ascend in sequence, but are formed in alternate colors: red ace, black deuce, red three, and so on.

II. Cards placed on the Auxiliaries descend in sequence, but must also alternate in color.

III. Vacancies in the Auxiliaries are filled by cards from the Rivals; vacancies in the Rivals, by cards from the pack or talon.

PLAY

Withdraw from the pack the eight aces, and place them in a horizontal line (the suits as in tableau). These are the foundation cards, which ascend in sequence to kings (Rule I).

Next deal out eight cards and place them above the foundations in two rows, four cards in each (see tableau). The upper row is called the Auxiliaries; the lower one, the Rivals. If any suitable cards are found in the Auxiliaries, play them, filling the spaces so made from the Rivals (Rule III). Cards from the Rivals may be placed in descending sequence on those of the Auxiliaries (Rule II), and the sequences so formed will be played as opportunity arises on to the foundations. Continue to deal out the pack, playing, placing on the Auxiliaries, and refilling spaces according to rules—the non-suitable cards forming a talon.

It must be remembered that cards can only be played on the foundations from the Auxiliaries, and not straight from the Rivals or from the talon; cards from these must first pass into the Auxiliaries.

There is no re-deal.



THE LABYRINTH

Two Entire Packs of Cards

RULES

I. The foundations follow suit.

II. Only cards in the highest or lowest rows are available, until a card from any other row is released, by the removal of cards either above or below it, the principle being that no card can be used that is not free either from the top or the bottom. Small crosses are placed on the tableau to mark the cards that are available.

III. You can only refill vacancies in the lowest row as the deal goes on (i.e., in the row which you are actually dealing).

IV. Each row must be completed before you can play from it.

PLAY

Withdraw from the pack and place in horizontal line above, four kings and four aces of different suits. These are the foundations, the aces ascending in sequence to kings, the kings descending to aces (Rule I).

You next deal out ten cards in a horizontal row, and when the row is complete, play any suitable cards on the foundations, refilling the vacancies from the pack or talon.

Proceed to deal out a second row of ten cards underneath the first, playing suitable ones as before, playing also from the upper row, and refilling spaces subject to Rule III. As you may only refill vacancies on the last row which is being dealt, there will be many gaps in the tableau as you proceed.

You continue thus to deal out the entire pack in successive rows, each row completely blocking the preceding one unless the removal of a card releases the one above it, or unless the removal of cards in the upper rows (Rule II) releases that card from above.

When the pack is exhausted and you have played all available cards, if the game has not succeeded, you have one more chance, i.e., the privilege of removing any one card from the tableau, taking care, of course, to remove the card which blocks those most needed. The choice of this "grace" is the only point left to the skill of the player.

There is no re-deal.

Note 1.—Some players instead of taking the foundations from the pack, wait till they appear in the deal.

Note 2.—The dimensions of the tableau preclude the insertion of the spaces for the foundation cards.



SPENSER'S FAIRIE QUEEN

Two Entire Packs of Cards

RULES

I. The foundations follow suit.

II. If during the deal two or more kings turn up in succession, cards can only be placed on the last one.

III. Available cards may be transferred from one column to another in descending sequence and need not follow suit.

IV. Only the lowest card of each column is available, until its removal releases the one above it.

V. Any available card may be transferred to a single king, and sequences may be placed upon that card as upon those of the other columns.

PLAY

Take one king from the pack, and place it at the left-hand upper corner. Upon this king you place the cards as they are dealt, in perpendicular column, each card half covering the preceding one, until a second king appears, which must be placed next to the first one, and becomes in its turn the head of a second column (Rule II). When a third king appears, it is placed next to the second one, and is treated in like manner, and so on until the pack is exhausted, cards being always placed on the last king turned up. Thus some kings will head lines of different lengths (see Note 3, on next page), and some will probably remain alone, and this, as will be seen, is very advantageous.

During the deal, aces as they turn up are placed in the spaces reserved.

The eight aces form the foundation cards and ascend in sequence to queens (Rule I). (See Note 2.)

Suitable cards may be played as they turn up in the deal, and after playing each, the columns should be examined, as the playing of a card may bring other available ones (Rule IV) into use.

When the deal is complete, the tableau must be carefully examined.

Available cards may now be transferred from one column to another (Rule III) or placed on the single kings (Rule V) or played on the foundations. And it is sometimes better not to play cards, but to leave them to receive sequences.

It is not advisable to transfer queens, as they cannot be moved again until required to complete the foundations, but it is often necessary to do so, when their removal would release cards urgently needed. The success of the game greatly depends on the skill of the player in transferring the sequences backward and forward so as to release as many cards as possible. There is no re-deal. (See Note 1.)

Note 1.—Supposing that you have two single kings and wish to release a knave of hearts which is blocked with a descending sequence, the last card of that sequence being a four, place the four and then the five on the two spare kings. The six is thus released, and if a seven should be at the bottom of any other column, you transfer the six on to it, and also the five and the four, thus again freeing the two kings. Now put up the seven and the eight (of the column you are trying to work off) on to those kings. Then transfer the seven to the eight, and place the nine on the remaining king. You have now only the ten left to block your knave of hearts; you will probably find, or be able to release, some other available knave, on which you will place the ten. In this somewhat complicated manner you arrive at the desired knave of hearts. The combinations are endless.

Note 2.—The spaces for the foundations are not marked for want of room.

Note 3.—It often happens that so many cards have to be dealt on to one king before the next one appears that the column can no longer be continued in a straight line. The player must, therefore, twist the cards to gain room (see tableau), the small crosses show the available cards.



THE TERRACE

Two Entire Packs of Cards

RULES

I. Only the last card (i.e., the right-hand one) of the Terrace is available till its removal releases the card next to it.

II. The foundations ascend in sequence and must be formed with alternate red and black cards.

III. Cards in the valley may be transferred in alternate descending sequence from one packet to another, and the uppermost card of the talon may also be placed in sequence on the valley, but, like those of the foundations, the sequences in the valley must be formed of alternate colors.

IV. Only the uppermost cards of the valley packets are available until their removal releases those beneath.

PLAY

Deal out from left to right a row of thirteen cards. This is called the Terrace. You next turn up from the pack in hand three cards, and choose one of the three as a foundation. Place the foundation card underneath the Terrace on the left side, and the seven other cards of similar value will take their places, as they turn up in the deal, in a line with the first foundation (see tableau).

You next place your two rejected cards underneath the foundation, and deal out seven other cards alongside, forming a third horizontal row of nine cards. This is called the valley. From the valley you take any foundations, and having placed them, you play also any other suitable cards (Rule II); but you must first examine the Terrace, as cards must always in preference be played from the Terrace (Rule I). Having played all suitable cards, and refilled the vacancies in the valley from the pack in hand, proceed to place cards in sequence in the valley (Rules III and IV), of course playing them in preference on the foundations when possible, but remember always to examine the Terrace, as the success of the game depends entirely on detaching cards from the Terrace. If even a suitable card could be played from the valley, and none were at the moment available on the Terrace, it would still be better to refrain from playing it, if an equally suitable card from the Terrace were likely shortly to be released. In reference to your choice of the foundation cards, you should always examine the available card of the Terrace and choose, if possible, one below it in value.

You next proceed to deal out the entire pack, playing on foundations (Rule II), placing and transferring cards in the valley (Rules III and IV), and refilling vacancies.

There is no re-deal.



GENERAL SEDGEWICK

One Entire Pack of Cards

RULES

I. The original five cards forming the cross are available, but when they are covered by the addition of others, only the uppermost card of each packet is available until its removal releases the card beneath.

II. The foundations follow suit.

III. Cards on the cross may be transferred in descending sequence from one packet to another, and cards from the pack or talon may also be placed in descending sequence on those of the cross.

IV. Cards on the cross need not follow suit.

PLAY

Deal five cards and place them in the form of a cross.

The next card turned is to be placed in the left-hand upper corner, and this constitutes the foundation card, the three others of similar value, as they appear, being placed in the three other corners (see tableau).

The foundation cards ascend in sequence (Rule II).

Having placed the cross and the first foundation, play any foundation or other suitable cards from the cross, filling the vacancies from pack or talon. You then proceed to transfer cards on the cross (Rules I, III, and IV); and although not necessary, it is very advantageous that these packets should be of the same suit, as they are then ready to be played on to the foundations, and to effect this by transferring the cards backward and forward as much as possible should be the great object of the player.

Continue to deal out the cards till the pack is exhausted—playing, transferring, and refilling vacancies. The non-suitable cards form the talon.

There is no re-deal.



THE QUEENS

Two Entire Packs of Cards

RULES

I. The foundations follow suit.

II. The uppermost card of the key is alone available until its removal releases the card beneath; each card that is played releasing the one that it covered.

III. Cards from the key can only be played on the foundations and may not be placed on the shutter.

IV. The cards in payment of the queens are taken from the top of the key (fourteen for each queen including herself).

V. Cards in payment of the queens are taken from the bottom of the talon (three for each queen exclusive of herself).

PLAY

Take from the pack thirty-two cards; place them in a packet on the left side, face upward. This packet is called the key. If the uppermost card should be a queen, take fourteen cards from the top of the key (including the queen) and place them at the bottom of the pack (Rule IV). After removing the fourteen cards, should the next card on the key chance also to be a queen, you repeat the process, thus adding twenty-eight cards to the pack, and diminishing those on the key. Even if the next card in like manner chanced to be a queen, you would take all the remaining cards of the key (which could, however, only be four) and add them to the pack,—thus getting rid of the key, which would greatly facilitate the success of the game.

After dealing out the key (and if you have good luck, diminishing it) you next proceed to deal seven cards, placing them in two rows of four and three cards respectively. (See tableau.) These are called the shutter. If during the dealing of these any kings appear, place them in a row above. The eight kings are the foundations, which ascend through aces to queens (Rule I).

When the shutter is dealt, play from it any suitable cards, refilling the spaces at once, but always first look to see if a card from the key is available (Rules II and III), and play that in preference, as it is all important to get rid of the key. Cards on the shutter can marry in descending line with each other, or with cards from the pack or talon. When you have married or played all available cards, deal out the remainder of the pack, playing, marrying, and refilling spaces; the unsuitable cards forming a talon.

You must carefully count the number of queens that you place in the talon (it is best to have some counters at hand for this purpose), as when the pack is exhausted each of these queens counts for three cards—i.e., for each queen you take from the bottom of the talon three cards besides herself (Rule V)—and these cards constitute a fresh pack to deal from.

Thus, if the talon contains six queens, you take from it eighteen cards exclusive of the six queens (Rule V) and deal them out again, and again count the queens to repay yourself as before. This is done to give a fresh chance of winning the game, as the talon is not re-dealt in its entirety. If the talon has not sufficient cards left to pay three for each queen, you simply take all that remain, and then there is good hope of success, if the key has also been played out.



THE HERRING-BONE

Two Entire Packs of Cards

RULES

I. The foundations follow suit.

II. The lowest (or twenty-eighth) card of the herring-bone is alone available until its removal releases the next one (i.e., the uppermost card of the fan above it), then the second card of the fan becomes the available one, then the third, then the single card above the fan just played, and so on, the removal of each card rendering the next one available.

III. All the cards in the side scenes and the four bars are available.

IV. Vacancies on the bars are refilled from cards of the herring-bone (Rule II), but vacancies on the side scenes may only be refilled from the pack or talon.

PLAY

Deal out twenty-eight cards, beginning from the top (see tableau), thus: Three at the top, placed fan shape, then a single card half covering the fan, then another fan half covering the single card, then another single card, and so on till you have seven fans and seven single cards: this is called the herring-bone, the last card being a single one and available. (Rule II.)

You next deal out eight cards, four on each side the herring-bone: these are called side scenes. Then place one card horizontally above and below each side scene: these are called bars. When these forty cards are placed, the next card dealt becomes the foundation, and is placed in one of the allotted spaces, the other seven cards of similar value being placed as they appear on the tableau, or during the deal.

Four of the foundations ascend in sequence and four descend (Rule I), and it is best to place the ascending on the right side, the descending on the left.

When the tableau is complete, and the first foundation has been played, examine the whole and play from the herring-bone, bars, or side scenes any foundations or other suitable cards. Always choose, in preference, cards from the herring-bone or bars, as on the removal of the herring-bone the success of the game mainly depends, and if a bar is removed, the available card on the herring-bone replaces it, thus releasing the next. (Rules II and III.)

Having played and refilled all spaces, proceed to deal out the entire pack, playing all suitable cards, and refilling spaces; the unsuitable cards forming the talon. In forming the foundations, one card at a time may be exchanged from the ascending to the descending sequence, and vice versa.

The talon may be taken up, shuffled, and re-dealt twice.

Note.—It is so exceedingly disadvantageous that there should be duplicate cards in the herring-bone, that in the German variety of this game the herring-bone is set out from a single pack before the two packs are shuffled.



THE OLGA

Four Piquet Packs

RULES

I. The foundations follow suit.

II. Each card in the flower-bed must be turned face upward as soon as the card immediately below it is removed. The card so turned is then available.

III. Cards on the flower-bed may be placed in descending sequence upon each other (and cards from the pack or talon may also be placed in sequence on the flower-bed), but must be so placed in alternate colors, i.e., a black eight upon a red nine, and so on.

PLAY

Deal out forty-nine cards in seven horizontal rows, each containing seven cards. This is called the flower-bed. In the first row the cards are placed face upward, in the second row face downward, and so on alternately, the seventh or last row being face upward. Should there not be space, each row may half cover the preceding one. The foundations consist of sixteen aces, ascending in sequence through sevens to kings (Rule I). When the flower-bed has been dealt, if any aces appear in the lowest row, play them in their allotted spaces, as also any deuces or other suitable cards, always turning the card above the one played, face upward. Available cards on the flower-bed (Rule II) may be placed in descending sequence on each other, but in alternate colors (Rule III). They may be transferred from one packet to another, and on doing this judiciously the success of the game depends. Cards from the pack or talon may also be placed in sequence (Rule III) on those of the flower-bed. [You are not obliged to play cards on the foundations, if to place them on the flower-bed seems more advantageous.] Continue to deal out the entire pack, playing on foundations, placing and transferring on the flower-bed, the unsuitable cards forming the talon. If you succeed in removing an entire perpendicular row of cards, the space at the top may be filled by any available card of the flower-bed (Rule II), and upon that card may be placed sequences (Rule III) as on the other rows.



CAESAR

Nine Cards from One Entire Pack

PLAY

Withdraw from one entire pack nine cards, composed of any suits, from ace to nine inclusive. Place these nine cards in three rows, each containing three cards. Endeavor, by changing their position, so to dispose them, that the number of pips in each row, counting the cards horizontally, perpendicularly, and diagonally, may make the sum of fifteen. The tableau shows only three fifteens, but if the cards are properly placed eight fifteens can be made.



RED AND BLACK

Two Entire Packs of Cards

RULES

I. The foundations follow suit.

II. Cards may be placed on the Volunteers in descending sequence, but they must be of alternate colors. On the black four (see tableau) would be placed a red three, then a black deuce, and so on.

PLAY

Withdraw from the pack the eight aces, placing them in pairs of alternate colors in a horizontal line (see tableau). These are the foundations and ascend in sequence to kings (Rule I). Next deal out eight cards, placing them underneath the foundations. This row of cards is called the Volunteers. Examine the Volunteers and play any suitable cards on to the foundations, immediately filling each vacancy from the cards in hand. When no more can be played, proceed to form sequences in descending line with cards of the Volunteers, subject strictly to Rule II; then again play all that are suitable and proceed to deal out the cards till the pack is exhausted, playing cards on the foundations or placing them in sequence on the Volunteers, and always refilling vacancies. The unsuitable cards form the talon.

When the pack is exhausted, the talon may be taken up, shuffled, and re-dealt once.



THE SQUARE

Two Entire Packs of Cards

RULES

I. The foundations follow suit.

II. The four aces (foundation cards) ascend in sequence to kings. When each packet has ascended to king, a second king (same suit) is placed on the top, and another sequence on the same packet descends to ace, with which the four foundations terminate.

PLAY

Deal out sixteen cards, as in tableau. This is the "Square" (Quadrat).

During the deal, the four aces of different suits must be placed in their allotted spaces as they appear. These are the foundations, which ascend in sequence to kings and descend again to aces (Rule II).

When the Square is complete, play from it any suitable cards, and marry both in ascending and descending line with cards on the Square, immediately refilling spaces from the pack or talon. Continue to deal out the whole pack, playing first in ascending, then in descending sequence (Rule II), marrying, and refilling spaces; the unsuitable cards forming the talon. The sequences on the Square can be reversed from one packet to another, thus if on one packet there were a sequence of which the top card was a nine, and on another a sequence of which the top card was either an eight or a ten (of course of the same suit), either of these could be placed on the nine and the whole sequence reversed, but great care must be taken in reversing sequences, lest cards should hopelessly block each other. Much practice is required in order to avoid this danger.

If the game succeeds, the double series of sequences which began with four aces, will likewise finish with four aces.

There is no re-deal.



MARGARETHE

One Entire Pack of Cards

RULES

I. The foundations follow suit.

II. The king foundations descend from ten to eight; the knaves, from seven to five; the queens, from four to two.

PLAY

Withdraw from the pack all the court cards and place them in the form of an M, as in tableau. These twelve cards are the foundations. All the aces as they appear are to be placed in one packet in the M underneath the knaves. You next deal nine cards and place them in the form of an A (see tableau).

These are the help cards, and from them you play any that are suitable on to the foundations, the first played on a king being a ten, on a knave a seven, and on a queen a four (Rules I and II), filling the spaces from the pack in hand. You next proceed to deal out the whole pack, playing on the foundations, placing aces in the reserved space in the M, refilling vacancies in the A, and placing unsuitable cards in the talon.

If the game succeeds, the final tableau will form an M composed of the eights, the fives and the twos, the four aces being placed crossways in the centre.

The talon may be re-dealt once.



MOUNT OLYMPUS

Two Entire Packs of Cards

RULES

I. The foundations and the battery follow suit.

II. The foundations ascend in alternate sequences; the aces, in odd numbers, 3, 5, 7, etc., till they finish with kings; the twos, in even numbers, 4, 6, 8, etc., till they finish with queens. (Knaves count eleven; queens, twelve.)

III. Cards may be placed on the battery in alternate descending sequence; thus, on a nine place a seven, on the seven, a five, on a queen place a ten, then an eight, and so on.

IV. The uppermost cards of the battery are alone available, until their removal releases those beneath.

PLAY

Withdraw from the pack the eight aces and the eight twos, and place them in the form of a pyramid, as in tableau; these are the foundations which ascend in alternate sequence, till they end respectively with kings and queens. (Rules I and II.)

Next deal out nine cards as in tableau, this is called the battery. Suitable cards of the battery may be played on the foundations, and may also be placed on each other in alternate descending sequence. (Rules I, III, and IV.) The unsuitable cards form the talon. Continue to deal out the entire pack, playing on the pyramid, placing cards on the battery, and refilling spaces from pack or talon.

If the game succeeds, the pyramid will be formed of alternate kings and queens.

The talon may be taken up and re-dealt once.



THE WHEEL

Two Entire Packs of Cards

RULES

I. Vacancies in the cushion are only refilled after the first deal, but not after any subsequent deal.

II. No two cards of the same value may be used in making each combination of eighteen.

III. Even when there are three cards on the cushion which make the required sum, these cards cannot be removed unless the cushion contains a court card to crown them. They must in that case remain in their places until a court card appears on the cushion.

IV. Court cards are excluded from the combinations, which must be made with the pips of minor cards, the court cards crowning each packet.

V. Only the uppermost cards of the cushion are available, but their removal releases those underneath.

PLAY

Withdraw the eight aces and place them in the form of a cross (see tableau). Next, deal out twelve cards in two horizontal rows beneath, but leaving room for the circle to be placed as in tableau. These twelve cards are called the cushion. The object is to make as many combinations of the sum of eighteen as possible with cards in the cushion. Each combination must be composed of three cards (Rule IV) and no two cards must be of similar value (Rule II). Some of the combinations, for example, might be 2, 7, 9, or 3, 5, 10, or 2, 6, 10, and so on.

When any three cards make the required sum, take them up together, and put any court card that may be in the cushion at the top, and place the packet thus crowned, face upward, on one of the spaces reserved in the circle. Should there be no court card, the combination cannot be made (Rule III). As you withdraw cards to place on the circle, refill the spaces from the pack in hand.

When no more combinations can be made, you proceed to deal out twelve more cards, covering those already forming the cushion, and to make fresh combinations with all available cards (Rule V); but when vacancies are now made they cannot be refilled. (Rule I.) Cards, therefore, in this and the subsequent deals may have to be dealt on to empty spaces from which other cards have been withdrawn.

You continue to deal out fresh rows following the same rules, and must never make combinations until each deal is complete.

If the game succeeds, the final tableau will show the cross of aces in the centre, surrounded by a circle of twenty-four court cards.

There is no re-deal.



TWO RINGS

Two Entire Packs of Cards

RULE

The foundations follow suit.

PLAY

Withdraw from the pack all the sevens and all the sixes, and arrange them as in tableau. These are the foundations. The sevens ascend to kings, the sixes descend to aces (Rule).

You next deal out eight cards in a horizontal line. This is called the bracelet. Take from the bracelet all suitable cards and play them on the foundations, refilling vacancies in the bracelet, and placing unsuitable cards on the talon.

If the game succeeds, the "Zwei Ringe" (two rings) will be formed respectively of kings and aces.

The talon may be taken up and re-dealt once.



THE NATION

Two Entire Packs of Cards

RULES

I. The foundations follow suit.

II. In dealing the cards of each column and counting them from one to eight, a card played on the foundation does not have its number repeated, the next card dealt counting as the following number.

III. Only the lowest card of each column is available until its removal releases the one above it; no card being available that has another below it.

PLAY

Withdraw from the pack four aces and four kings of different suits, placing them above in two horizontal lines. These are the foundations, the aces ascending in sequence to kings, the kings descending to aces (Rule I). Underneath the foundations deal out eight cards in a perpendicular line, beginning on the left-hand side; and on the right of this column deal eleven other columns, each consisting of eight cards.

This would result in twelve columns of equal number of cards, as seen in tableau, but for the following conditions: In dealing the first eight cards, count them as you deal, from one to eight, and when any card is suitable for a foundation, or to continue a foundation, play it, counting the next card as the following number. For example, if the card counted as No. 4 were suitable, you play it and count the next card No. 5; and if No. 7 were likewise suitable, you would play it and count the next (and last) card as No. 8, although, in fact, the column would only contain six cards (Rule II). But although suitable cards are thus played as they turn up in the deal, a card once placed in a column cannot be removed. You should observe the same method in dealing out all the twelve columns. When the tableau is complete, the lower card of each column is available (Rule III), and may be played if suitable; and marriages also may be made, both in ascending and descending sequences, with available cards from each column.

When an entire column has been removed, the vacant space may be filled by any one available card (Rule III), and cards can be placed in sequence upon it, as on those of the other columns.

When all available cards have been played or married, the tableau is to be taken up, beginning with the left-hand column, the cards of each column being carefully kept in their proper order, the second column being placed underneath the first, the third underneath the second, and so on. Thus, when the pack is turned to re-deal, the last column will be the uppermost, and will be the first of the new columns.

The tableau may be taken up and re-dealt twice.



THE CARPET

Two Entire Packs of Cards

RULES

I. The foundations follow suit.

II. Cards on the carpet (teppich) are only available when one of the narrow ends is free (i.e., the top or bottom of the card). No card is available when both the narrow ends are blocked by other cards. On the tableau crosses are placed to show the available cards after the carpet has been dealt.

III. When a card from the carpet is played, it does not free the next one, because its removal cannot free either of the narrow ends of that card, yet it helps the game indirectly, and the inner cards become by degrees available.

IV. When the talon is formed, any available cards from the carpet can be placed in ascending or descending sequences upon the uppermost card of the talon, following suit.

PLAY

Withdraw from the pack four aces and four kings of different suits. These are the foundations, and ascend and descend in the usual sequences.

Next deal out sixty-four cards exactly in the order and pattern of those in the tableau. This is called the carpet (teppich). Play from the carpet all available cards (Rules I and II), and then deal out the remainder, playing suitable ones or placing the unsuitable cards as a talon. When the talon is formed, examine the carpet before you place each card of the talon, as you have the privilege of placing cards from the carpet on to the talon (Rules II and IV), and it is always advisable to do this when possible, for although at the moment the cards removed may not release others, it assists the development of the game by diminishing the number of cards in the carpet. In dealing the cards, suitable ones need not be played on a foundation, if by placing them on the talon a greater number can be freed from the carpet. The success of the game mainly depends on detaching cards from the carpet. Great care must be taken to carry out strictly Rule II.

No card can possibly be used, either to play on a foundation or to be placed in sequence on the talon, unless one of the narrow ends is free; but as other cards are removed, those even in the centre become available by a clear lane having been opened out, either horizontal or perpendicular, leading up to one of the narrow ends of each card.

The talon may be taken up, shuffled, and re-dealt twice, but great care must be taken in the third deal as to the placing of sequences. If one foundation of any suit is finished, sequences from the carpet should not be formed on the talon except in descending sequence; but, of course, if, in dealing the talon, cards should get placed in the wrong (ascending) sequence, there is no remedy, but in that case the game could not succeed.

There are two re-deals.



THE FISH-BONE

Two Entire Packs of Cards

RULES

I. The foundations follow suit.

II. Kings and queens cannot find their places on the tableau until the knaves to which they belong have been placed (i.e., each foundation knave should have a king and queen of the same suit on either side, see tableau). If, therefore, a king or queen should turn up in the deal, it must be consigned to the talon, unless one of the knaves of the same suit is already placed to receive it.

PLAY

Deal out six cards on the left-hand side (see tableau). These are called the gridiron. Cards in the gridiron may marry in ascending sequence, but only with cards from the pack or talon, and not with each other. The foundation cards are the eight knaves, which descend in sequence to aces (Rule I), and are to be played as they appear in the deal, in a perpendicular line (see tableau). You next examine the gridiron, and if a knave is there, play it, as also any other suitable cards to continue the foundations, and as kings and queens appear, place them, in accordance with Rule II. You continue to deal out the entire pack, playing on the foundations, and marrying in ascending sequence on the gridiron, from which you play all suitable cards, refilling vacancies from the pack or talon. Never omit to place the kings and queens when it can be done (Rule II). The unsuitable cards form the talon.

If the game succeeds, the final tableau will show a line of aces, each having a king and a queen of the same suit on either side.

The talon may be taken up and re-dealt once, observing the same rules.



THE CONGRESS

Two Entire Packs of Cards

RULES

I. The foundations follow suit.

II. Cards from the rivers may marry in descending line with cards on the helps, but not vice versa.

III. Cards on the help packets may marry in descending line with cards of each other's packets, and also with cards from the rivers.

IV. The uppermost cards of the help packets are alone available until their removal releases those beneath.

V. Each row of cards on the rivers blocks the preceding one, but on the removal of any card the one immediately above it is released, and becomes available.

PLAY

Withdraw from the pack the eight aces, and place them in two columns on the right: these are the foundations, which ascend in sequence to kings (Rule I). Next deal four cards, and place them in a horizontal line below, leaving plenty of room for the tableau above: these are called the help cards. Next place at the upper end of the table a horizontal row of eight cards: this commences what is called the "rivers," and from the rivers you play any suitable cards on the foundations, or marry in descending line with the help cards (Rule II), immediately refilling the vacancies thus caused from the pack. From the helps you now play on to the foundations, and form marriages in accordance with Rule III. When all possible cards have been played, proceed to deal out successive rows of eight cards on the rivers, each row partly covering the preceding one, and temporarily blocking it (Rule V). In dealing, you may not play a card from any row until that row is complete. After dealing each row, pause and examine the tableau, playing and marrying all suitable cards, and refilling vacancies, both in the rivers and helps, with cards from the pack. In filling up vacancies in the rivers, those in the uppermost rows must first be refilled.

After the entire pack is exhausted, the skill of the player will be required. The four packets of help cards may now be increased to eight. To effect this, any four available cards may be selected from the rivers to begin the new packets, which have all the privileges of the original ones, and should be placed in the same line. The player may use his own discretion concerning them. He is not obliged to place the four new helps at once, but only as they are required, and it is best to keep one or two of the spaces free, so as to receive any card from the rivers which, in the progress of the game, is found to block a card much needed. If any of the packets of help cards are played off, the vacancy may be filled by another card from the rivers, but the packets must never exceed the number of eight.

There is no re-deal.

Note.—In the tableau only three rows of the rivers are shown.



THE "LOUIS" PATIENCE

Two Entire Packs of Cards

RULES

I. The foundations follow suit, as do also cards of the alphabet.

II. During the deal each circle of the alphabet absolutely blocks the preceding one, but, when the entire deal is complete, the removal of cards from the alphabet releases those on the circles beneath, which now become available.

PLAY

Withdraw from the pack four aces and four kings of different suits, and place them as in tableau. The aces ascend in sequence to kings, the kings descend to aces (Rule I). You next deal twelve cards, forming a square outside the foundations, each card bearing a letter: this square is called the alphabet. Begin the deal at letter a, and finish it at letter m, and during the deal play any suitable cards as they turn up. You must now examine the alphabet, and play from it any suitable cards, but observe that as each circle of the alphabet is dealt it blocks the previous one, and cards in the lower circles cannot be used, even if released, until the entire pack has been dealt (Rule II).

You next proceed to deal out a second circle of twelve cards, on the top of the first one, beginning as before with a and finishing with m; and you continue to deal out successive circles until the pack is exhausted, observing the same rules with regard to each circle.

When the entire pack has been dealt out, and all available cards have been played (Rule II), you are allowed to form marriages, both in ascending and descending line, with the available cards of the alphabet. When no more cards can be played, or married, take up the alphabet in succession, beginning with the letter g, and ending with f. In this manner the order of the packets is reversed.

Then, without shuffling, deal out all the cards as before, beginning at a, and finishing at m, observing the same rules as in the first deal. If during this second deal a card turns up suitable alike for an ascending or descending foundation, you can place it on either, and you may change it from one to the other. If you prefer it, you may even lay the card aside for the moment, playing it on whichever foundation appears the most suitable as the game progresses.

There may be three re-deals.



SLY

Two Entire Packs of Cards

RULES

I. The foundations follow suit.

II. Cards dealt on to the promenade need not follow suit, and are not necessarily placed in sequence.

III. Only the uppermost card of each packet of the promenade is available until its removal releases the card beneath.

IV. Cards may be played as they turn up in the deal, but a card once placed on the promenade cannot be played until each deal of twenty cards is complete.

PLAY

Deal out two horizontal rows, each consisting of ten cards (or you may, if you prefer it, place four rows of five cards): this is called the promenade.

The foundations will consist of four aces and four kings of different suits, the aces ascending in sequence to kings, the kings descending to aces (Rule I). During the deal, if any foundations appear, place them at once in their allotted spaces, and also play any other suitable cards as they turn up, refilling vacancies from the pack. When the first deal of twenty cards is complete, examine the promenade and play from it all suitable cards.

When no more can be played, deal out a second row of twenty cards, always, however, playing suitable ones as they turn up in the deal. This second row of twenty cards must be placed on the top of (i.e., covering) the first row, but in any manner and on any cards of the promenade you please. You have the option of heaping several cards on to one packet, or of merely placing a second row on the top of the first; but you must carefully count the cards as you place them, as each deal of twenty cards must be complete before any can be played—(the cards that have been played during the deal do not count among the twenty). Continue to deal out in like manner successive rounds of twenty cards, observing the same rules, until the pack is exhausted. Between each deal examine the promenade, and play from it all available cards (Rule III), refilling vacancies from the pack.

The success of the game entirely depends on the skill of the player in arranging cards on the promenade. It is advantageous to place cards in sequence, and of the same suit, on the packets of the promenade (although it is not required, see Rule II), as they are then ready to be played on the foundations; but the greatest care is required to avoid placing two ascending or two descending sequences of the same suit on any packet, as one of the two would necessarily be useless, cards not being transferable from one packet to another.

There is no re-deal.



THE GREAT THIRTEEN

Two Entire Packs of Cards

RULES

I. The uppermost card of each of the ground packets is alone available until its removal releases the card beneath.

II. If in the development of the game a card is released in the ground packets which is equally suitable for filling a vacancy in the numerals (caused by the ground packets having failed to produce the desired sum), or for the process of addition, the preference must be given to filling the vacancy.

III. In dealing the ground packets in the first instance it is advisable to count them in order from one to eight, in order to verify their exact position; for in re-dealing the ground packets at the end of the game they must be counted from one to eight, and the cards must be dealt on to them in order, whether there are cards in each space or whether there is a vacancy, through the packet having been played off. The packet of cards or the vacancy are to be treated in like manner.

PLAY

This is a very difficult game and requires much attention. Among other peculiarities it has no foundation cards.

Deal out eight packets in a horizontal line, each containing thirteen cards dealt together: these are called ground packets. Deal them from left to right (Rule III). If in this first deal any kings appear on the surface, slip them underneath the packets to which each belongs; but this may only be done in the first deal. When the eight ground packets have been dealt, take the uppermost card of each, and place these eight cards in a line above: this line is called the balcony. Between the balcony and the ground packets be careful to leave space for the line of numerals (see tableau). You now count the value of each card in the balcony, and double it, the knave counting eleven, the queen twelve, and the king thirteen, with which card, if the game succeeds, each of the numeral packets will terminate. If any card on the ground packets (Rule I) corresponds to the doubled value of any card on the balcony, you place that (ground-packet) card immediately below the balcony card, thus beginning the packets called numerals.

Example (see tableau).—On the blank cards, the numeral 6 is placed under a three, the 4 under a two; but if in doubling, the value of any balcony card exceeds thirteen, the excess over thirteen constitutes the value of the card to be placed underneath.

Example.—An ace (numerals) is placed under a seven, the double of seven being fourteen, which is one in excess of thirteen. A knave (Bube) is placed under a queen; the double of twelve being twenty-four, which is eleven in excess of thirteen. A three under an eight; the double of eight being sixteen, which is three in excess of thirteen.

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