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[Transcriber's Note: The original text used accented characters to indicate pronunciation. This 7 bit version has been produced using the following markup scheme.

The accented character and the symbol representing the accent are surrounded with square brackets. If the symbol is placed in front of the character, the accent goes above the character. If the symbol is placed after the character, the accent goes below the character. If there is more than one character inside the brackets, the accent applies to all of them.

Accent Symbol acute / macron = breve ) diaresis : tilde ~ dot . cedilla 5 circumflex ^ up tack backslash th ligature [t-h] horizontal strikethrough - ]

* * * * *

BARNES'S NEW NATIONAL READERS

* * * * *

NEW NATIONAL FIRST READER

BY CHARLES J. BARNES HARLAN H. BALLARD S. PROCTOR THAYER

NEW YORK—CINCINNATI—CHICAGO AMERICAN BOOK COMPANY

1888, by A.S. BARNES & CO.

* * * * *



The authors of this book believe,—

1st.—That the Word Method is the most natural and practicable, because words are representatives of objects, actions, etc., while letters, or sounds, in the abstract, convey no meaning to the pupil, and are devoid of interest.

2d.—That words of ordinary length are as easily learned as short ones, provided they are familiar to the pupil. No teacher will doubt the statement that a pupil will learn the word "mamma'" as easily as "says" or "eyes."

3d.—That frequent "Reviews" are essential to the rapid and thorough advancement of pupils. By this means the words imperfectly learned are again brought to their attention and thoroughly memorized. That these "Reviews" ought to take up the new words in a different order and arrangement, in order to test the ability of the pupil to recognize them in any situation. That as soon as the vocabulary is large enough they should be written in the form of a new exercise, as on pp. 36, 44, 52, 60, and 68 of this book. 4th.—That thorough and systematic drill in Spelling is absolutely necessary. That the "Reading Reviews" should be so constructed as to contain all the new words used in the lessons they were intended to review, and no others, so that they can be used for "Written or Dictation Spelling." That the pronunciation of the words in the "Spelling Reviews" should be indicated by the diacritical marks of Webster, so that they can be used for either "Oral Spelling" or "Phonic Drill."

5th.—That the "Script" from which the pupil gets his first and most lasting impressions should be of large size and accurate form, and not of the nondescript character usually found in books of this class. That it should be free from superfluous line and flourish, and yet have grace and beauty. That it should be adapted for both copying and reading.

6th.—That the lessons should be largely "conversational in style," to cultivate flexibility of voice and to break up the dreary monotone so frequently heard among children.

7th.—That the lessons of a book of this grade should not average more than seven "new words." That all such words should appear at the commencement of lessons, and be familiar to the pupil. That this method secures careful gradation, and is in marked contrast with the old custom of having from fifteen to twenty-five.

8th.—That "Outline Drawings" of the objects first presented to pupils should be made in the presence of the class, as it stimulates them to draw, and thus makes easy and profitable the copying of the "Script Exercises."

9th.—That the schoolbook of to-day must be beautifully and copiously illustrated. That there must be variety as well as excellence, both in drawing and engraving. That well-known and famous artists must be secured, such as Harper, Fredericks, Church, Lippincott, Eytinge, White, Beard, Weldon, Thulstrup, Cary, Moser, Weaver, and Share; and such engravers as Karst, Wigand, French, Held, Davis, Hellawell, etc.

10th.—That the exercises must be instructive as well as interesting, and that no artificial system of vowel classification ought to interfere with the free and natural use of words.

11th.—That a book of this kind should be suited to the wants of graded and ungraded schools, there evidently being nothing in the one not readily adaptable to the other.

12th.—That every book of this class should contain a collection of brief extracts from standard literature to be committed to memory.

13th.—That this book is constructed on the above principles.



ALPHABETS.

[Script: A a] A a

[Script: B b] B b

[Script: C c] C c

[Script: D d] D d

[Script: E e] E e

[Script: F f] F f

[Script: G g] G g

[Script: H h] H h

[Script: I i] I i

[Script: J j] J j

[Script: K k] K k

[Script: L l] L l

[Script: M m] M m

[Script: N n] N n

[Script: O o] O o

[Script: P p] P p

[Script: Q q] Q q

[Script: R r] R r

[Script: S s] S s

[Script: T t] T t

[Script: U u] U u

[Script: V v] V v

[Script: W w] W w

[Script: X x] X x

[Script: Y y] Y y

[Script: Z z] Z z

[Script: &] &

FIGURES. [Script: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0]



FIRST READER



PART I



LESSON I.



dog it is a dog

It is a dog.

SCRIPT EXERCISE.

[Script: dog] [Script: dog]



LESSON II.

NEW WORDS.

boy the and run see



See the boy and the dog.

The boy and the dog run.

SCRIPT EXERCISE.

[Script: boy] [Script: boy]



LESSON III.

NEW WORDS.

rat big can get this



This is a big rat.

Can the dog get the rat?

The dog can get the rat.

SCRIPT EXERCISE.

[Script: rat] [Script: rat]



LESSON IV.

NEW WORDS.

hen nest box on in



See the hen and the nest. The hen is on the nest. The nest is in a box.

SCRIPT EXERCISE.

[Script: hen] [Script: box]



LESSON V.

NEW WORDS.

cat egg will an at



The big cat is at the nest. Will the cat get an egg? See the hen run at the cat! Run, hen, run!

SCRIPT EXERCISE.

[Script: Run] [Script: hen]



LESSON VI.

READING REVIEW.[A]

I. See the boy and the dog. Is it a big dog?

II. The dog can get the big rat. Is this hen on the nest?

III. Is the nest in a box? The big cat is at the nest.

IV. Will the cat get an egg? The hen will run at the cat.



SPELLING REVIEW.

ĭt ăt bĭḡ [t-h]ē sē[e] răt ĭ[s] ăn dŏḡ ănd ȼăn hĕn ĭn ŏn boy rŭn ḡĕt bŏx ȼăt ĕḡ[g] wĭl[l] [t-h]ĭs nĕst

[Footnote A: See p. 3, 4.]



LESSON VII.

SCRIPT EXERCISE

[Script: See the dog run.

The boy can run.

See the big nest.

Run, hen, run!]

OBJECT EXERCISE.

See the and the The ran at the The ran at the Can the get the The is in the The is in the

LESSON VIII.

NEW WORDS.

his fast yes not as them



This is a boy and his dog. Can the boy and his dog run fast? Yes. See them run. The boy can not run as fast as the dog. Run, boy, run!

SCRIPT EXERCISE.

[Script: Run fast, dog!]



LESSON IX.

NEW WORDS

white little bird eggs you are do I



Do you see this little bird? Yes, I see the little bird. Do you see this little nest? Yes, and I see the eggs in it. The eggs in the nest are white.

SCRIPT EXERCISE.

[Script: See the little bird.]



LESSON X

NEW WORDS.

Ann play her ran girl was likes



Do you see the little girl and her cat? See them play. This little girl is Ann. Ann likes her cat. This cat was in a nest. A hen ran at her.

SCRIPT EXERCISE.

[Script: This girl is Ann.]



LESSON XI.

NEW WORDS.

top has spin how he makes



The boy has a big top. Spin! Spin! Spin! See how he makes it spin! Can you spin a top? Yes, I can spin a top. A boy likes a big top.



LESSON XII.

READING REVIEW.

I. The boy and his dog can run fast. Do you see them run? Can the dog run as fast as the boy? Yes, he can.

II. I do not see the little bird. I see the eggs in the nest. Are the eggs white? Yes, the eggs are white.

III. Was the girl Ann? Yes. Her cat likes play. Was the cat at the nest? Yes, and the hen ran at her.

IV. The boy has a top. See how fast he makes it spin! Can you spin a top? Yes, I can spin a top.

SCRIPT EXERCISE.

[Script: Spin] [Script: Spin]



LESSON XIII.

SPELLING REVIEW.

Ī ă[s] do hē [y][o]ū wạ[s] (wŏz) hă[s] hĭ[s] yĕs nŏt är[e] Ăn[n] hẽr răn ĕḡ[g][s] bĩrd ḡĩrl spĭn how tŏp [t-h]ĕm fȧst whīt[e] plā[y] līk[e]s māk[e]s lĭt'tl[e]

SCRIPT EXERCISE.

[Script: The little girl likes her cat.

The dog and hen run at the cat.

Can a boy spin a top?

The eggs are white.

The nest is little.]



LESSON XIV.

NEW WORDS.

tree birds floor cats rats one two three four



One, one, one, Little dog, run.

Two, two, two. Cats see you.

Three, three, three, Birds in a tree.

Four, four, four, Rats on the floor.



LESSON XV.

NEW WORDS.

good gave to doll hat new like mam ma'



Ann has a new doll. Her mamma' gave it to her. Ann likes the doll, and will get it a new hat. Are you a good girl? Do you like a doll?



LESSON XVI.

NEW WORDS.

O me may put ride take too my with



Ann, will you take a ride with me? O yes! I will. May I take my doll too? Yes, you may take the doll. Ann will put on her hat, and take her doll to ride.

SCRIPT EXERCISE.

[Script: Ann likes her doll.]



LESSON XVII.

NEW WORDS.

we that five they ver'y those snow pret'ty



How fast we ride! I like to ride, and my doll likes it too.

Ann, do you see those five little birds on that tree?

O yes! I see them. Are they not very pretty birds?

Yes. They are snowbirds.



LESSON XVIII.

READING REVIEW.

I. I see one dog and two cats. Do you see the three birds in the tree, and the four rats on the floor?

II. Yes, and I see the new doll my good mamm gave to Ann. I like the doll. It is a very pretty one. May I take it to ride?

III. O yes! and I will put on my hat and take a ride too. Do you see me with my doll?

IV. Do we not ride fast? See those five snowbirds in that tree. Are they not pretty birds?

SCRIPT EXERCISE.

[Script: How fast we ride!]



LESSON XIX.

SPELLING REVIEW.

Ō to mē mȳ (mī) wē t[=oo] hăt trē[e] ȼăts one (wŭn) t[w]o (t[=oo]) new (nū) pụt mā[y] răts thrē[e] fō[u]r snō[w] dŏl[l] līk[e] tāk[e] rīd[e] wĭ[t-h] flō[o]r (flōr) ḡ[)oo]d ḡāv[e] fīv[e] [t-h]ō[s][e] [t-h]ăt [t-h]e[y] vĕr'y bĩrd[s] pret'ty (prĭt'ty) mȧm mä'

SCRIPT EXERCISE.

[Script: The new doll is very pretty. It will ride with Ann.

It has a new hat.

A good girl likes her doll.]



LESSON XX.

NEW WORDS.

go off did bad why here have Rov'er



Here, Rover, here! That is my hat! Do not run off with it!

You are a bad dog to run off with my hat. I will not have you with me. You are not a good dog.

You bad dog! Why did you go off with my hat?



LESSON XXI.

NEW WORDS.

kit'ty saw soft catch fur its she small



This is my little kitty.

How soft and white its fur is!

Is it not pretty? The cat is on the box. She saw a big rat and ran to catch it.

The kitty was too small to catch the rat.

SCRIPT EXERCISE.

[Script: This is my kitty.]



LESSON XXII.

NEW WORDS.

up ho down boys mer'ry back hill o'ver



Ho, ho! How we go

Down the hill, Over the snow.

Ho, ho! Back we go, Up the hill, over the snow.

Down the hill, and over the snow, We merry boys, how fast we go!

SCRIPT EXERCISE.

[Script: How fast we go!]



LESSON XXIII.

NEW WORDS.

if race girls out look sled hurt now give



The boys and girls are out at play.

Look out, boy! Do not get hurt!

Will you give me a ride, little boy?

O yes! you may ride on my new sled.

Now, Rover, we will have a race.

Run fast, Rover! If you do not run fast, I will catch you!



LESSON XXIV.

READING REVIEW.

I. Ann likes her small kitty. Its fur is soft and white. It saw the cat catch the big rat.

II. Ann likes Rover too. She saw Rover run off with the hat. Here, Rover, here! You are a bad dog! Why did you run off with the hat?

III. Ho, ho! Look at the boys and girls. See them go down the hill, over the snow. Now they go back, up the hill.

IV. They are out at play. They will not get hurt. How merry they are! Ann, I will give you a ride on my sled. We will have a race with Rover and see how fast we can run.



LESSON XXV

SPELLING REVIEW.

ĭf ĭts bă[c]k slĕd hō fûr ō'vẽr ḡĩrl[s] ḡō shē sŏft hûrt ŭp out boy[s] hăv[e] ŏf[f] now l[)oo]k ȼă[t]ch dĭd whȳ ḡĭv[e] smal[l] băd hĭl[l] rā[c5][e] (rās) kĭt'ty sa[w] down Rōv'ẽr hēr[e] mĕr'ry

SCRIPT EXERCISE.

[Script: Will Rover ride on the sled?

No, he will run a race with the boy. Rover is a bad, bad dog. He ran off with the hat.]



LESSON XXVI.

NEW WORDS.

from come be a way' there of what soon



Bad boy! bad boy! Come down from that tree. Do not take the eggs from the nest. What a bad boy, to take the eggs of a bird!

Go away, bad boy; do not take the eggs, and soon there will be three pretty birds in the nest.



LESSON XXVII.

NEW WORDS.

Roy drum march rub'-a-dub



fun gun beat

Now, Roy, you beat the drum, and we will march. I have my new hat and gun. Now go on. Rub-a-dub, rub-a-dub! Here we go! March, march, march! Do you like to march, Roy?

Yes. What fun it is to beat a drum, and march with a gun!



LESSON XXVIII.

NEW WORDS.

Ned no us let hand ap'ple your some



Here, Ned, catch this apple in your hand.

No, I will catch it in my hat.

Now I have it. What a big apple it is!

Let us take some to mamma'.

O yes! she likes them. I will get her some.

We will take them to her in my hat.

O here is a very big apple! We will give her this one too.



LESSON XXIX.

NEW WORDS.

ap'ples ma'ny more glad where near pond am



Look, mamma'! See the big apples we have!

O where did you get them?

From the big apple tree, near the pond. Do you like apples, mamma'?

O yes! I am glad to get them. How many have you?

Five, and there are more on the tree. May we give some to Ann?

Yes. She likes apples too.



LESSON XXX.

READING REVIEW.

Boy, come down from that tree! Come away, and soon there will be little birds in the nest.

What a bad boy, to take the eggs of a bird!

Did you see the boys with the drum and gun, Ned?

Yes. I saw Roy beat his drum, rub-a-dub, rub-a-dub! I am glad the boys have a drum. It is fun to march, march, march.

Will you give me the apple you have in your hand, Ned?

No. I will give this one to mamma'. I have some more apples in my hat, and will give you one.

Let us see how many you have. One, two, three, four, five. Where did you get them, Ned?

From the big apple tree down near the pond.



LESSON XXXI.

SPELLING REVIEW.

ŭs bē nō lĕt ăm fŭn of (ŏv) ȧwā[y]' ḡŭn ḡlăd bē[a]t Roy Nĕd nē[a]r pŏnd mōr[e] märch s[=oo]n [y][o]ūr frŏm whạt ȼȯm[e] (kŭm) ma'ny (mĕn'y) rŭb'-a-dŭb hănd [t-h]êr[e] sȯm[e] (sŭm) drŭm ăp'pl[e] whêr[e] ăp'pl[e]s[]

SCRIPT EXERCISE.

[Script: Did Roy take the eggs of a bird?

O no, it was a bad, bad boy. Roy beat the drum.

Mamma do you like apples?]



LESSON XXXII.

NEW WORDS.

ship nice but sail by for



Here we are by the pond. Ned, your ship is a very nice one. May I take it?

Yes, you may; but do not hurt it.

Will it sail fast, Ned?

Yes, it will sail very fast.

Mamma', may I have a ship too?

Yes, if you are a good girl, I will get a nice one for you.



LESSON XXXIII.

NEW WORDS.

man toys book came dish'es old left ask know fun'ny



O Roy, do look here! What pretty toys!

Where did they come from?

Here is a drum, a ship, and a top for you; and a doll, a book, and some little dishes for me.

Did mamma' give them to us, Roy?

O no! a funny old man came and left them for us.

What old man was it, Roy?

I do not know what old man it was, but we will go and ask mamma'.

Little girls and boys, do you know who left the toys for Roy and Ann?

SCRIPT EXERCISE

[Script: Roy has a drum, a ship, and a top.

Ann has a doll and some dishes.

Who left the toys?]



LESSON XXXIV.

NEW WORDS.

Ma'ry in'to hold made chicks well hay un'der



Look, Ned, here is a nest! It is made in this hay, and the old hen is in it.

Put your hand into the, nest, Mary.

O no, the hen will not let me!

But, Mary, I will hold her.

Well, Ned, if you can hold her, I will put my hand into the nest.

O Ned, there are some little chicks under the hen!

Are there?

Do take her off from the nest and let us see them.

SCRIPT EXERCISE

[Script: Ned, here is a nest.]



LESSON XXXV.

NEW WORDS.

care dear feed six food hide wings wa'ter chick

Now, Ned, the hen is off the nest, and we can see the chicks. There are six of them.

O the dear little chicks! How pretty they are!

We will feed them, Mary.

Yes, I will run and get some food and give them some water.



Here, chick, chick, chick! Here is some water for you.

Will the old hen take care of them, Ned?

O yes! She will hide them under her wings.



LESSON XXXVI.

READING REVIEW.

See, mamma'! What a nice ship Ned has!

Yes, it is a very nice ship. You and Ned may go down by the pond and sail it, but do not get into the water.

Come, Ned, let us go. Did you see Roy?

Yes, and I saw the pretty toys the funny old man left for Mary.

What old man, Ned?

I do not know, but he came and left a ship, drum, book, and some little dishes.

O how good! Look, here is Mary. I will ask her to let me see them.

Now let us go and see the nest the hen made in the hay.

Well, come on. Mary will go too.

Here is the hen, Ned. Let us see if there are some little chicks under her.

Ned, you hold the hen, and Mary will put her hand into the nest.

Is there a chick under her, Mary?

O yes! Take the hen off the nest.

Well! well! Do look at the dear little chicks. One, two, three, four, five, six, of them.

Run, Ned, get some food, and we will feed them.

Will the hen take care of them?

Yes, she will hide them under her wings.



LESSON XXXVII.

SPELLING REVIEW.

bȳ shĭp b[)oo]k wĭng[s] bŭt sā[i]l ȼām[e] Mā'ry ōld wĕl[l] ĭn'to dĭsh'ĕ[s] măn nī[c5][e] dē[a]r ŭn'dẽr ȧsk lĕft hīd[e] wa'tẽr hă[y] hōld mād[e] fŭn'ny sĭx f[=oo]d chĭ[c]k ȼâr[e] fôr fē[e]d chĭ[c]ks [k]nō[w] toy[s]

SCRIPT EXERCISE.

[Script: What did Mary find with the hen?

How many chicks did the hen have in the nest?]



LESSON XXXVIII.

NEW WORDS.

Fi'do full each seem oth'er think say pup'pies

Here are my three little puppies. Are they not pretty? Old Fido has a rat. See how the puppies look at it.

They think it will hurt them if they go too near it.



They seem to say, "Take it away, mamma', we do not like it."

The puppies are full of fun. I like to see them play with each other.

Will you have one of my puppies?



LESSON XXXIX.

NEW WORDS.

red side steer fear



See my sled. It is red.

Will you ride By my side?

Can you steer? Do not fear.

How we go On the snow!

NEW WORDS.

Jack Jill clear track all fall



Clear the track! Hold me, Jack!

Let you fall? Not at all.

O what fun! Back they run,

Up the hill, Jack and Jill.



LESSON XL.

NEW WORDS.

start string strong hur rah' fly try high kite kites

Come on, boys. Let us fly our kites.

Hurrah! that will be fun. I will try my new kite. Have you a strong string with your new kite, Ned?

Yes, it is very strong.



Roy has a kite. How high it is!

Yes, Ned, but my kite will fly as high as his. Now you hold it, and I will run to give it a start.



LESSON XLI.

NEW WORDS.

him held warm make cold does nose eyes froze



Roy, did you make that snow man?

Yes. Does he not look funny? He is a funny man, Roy. What a big nose he has, and big eyes too!

Will he not fall down?

No, I put some water on him. The water froze, and that held the snow.

Are you not very cold, Roy?

Yes, come, let us have a good run, and that will make us warm.



LESSON XLII.

READING REVIEW.

Hurrah, boys! Clear the track! Here come Jack and Jill on a red sled. Look, Roy! See Jack steer the sled down the hill. Jill is by his side.

Does Jill fear the fast ride?

No, Ned, not at all. Jack will not let her fall. Roy, did you say you made that snow man?

Yes, I made him.

What a funny nose he has! What big eyes! Will he fall down, Roy?

No, he will not fall. I put some water on him. The water froze, and that held the snow.

Let me make one, Roy.

O no! it is too cold. Let us go in and get warm.

Well, we will start now. Come in and see my little puppies. Here they are, and here is Fido too. Do you think they are pretty?

Yes, I do. See them play with each other. They seem to be full of fun. Is this your kite, Roy?

Yes, I have two kites. See what a strong string this one has.

Do you like to fly kites?

Yes, and pretty soon I will try my new one. It will fly very high.



LESSON XLIII.

SPELLING REVIEW.

flȳ trȳ sā[y] rĕd al[l] hĭm dȯ[e][s] (dŭz) nō[s][e] māk[e] hĕld ȼōld [e]ȳ[e][s] (īz) hī[g][h] (hī) kīt[e] fụl[l] ē[a]ch fē[a]r tră[c]k sīd[e] Jĭl[l] Jă[c]k stē[e]r fal[l] ȼlē[a]r Fī'dō warm pŭp'pĭ[e][s] frōz[e] strĭng kīt[e]s stärt strŏng sē[e]m ȯ[t-h]'ẽr (ŭ[t-h]'ẽr) thĭnk hụr rä[h]'

SCRIPT EXERCISE.

[Script: I have two kites. One will fly very high. Will you fly your kite with me? O, yes, let us go.]



LESSON XLIV.

NEW WORDS.

seek then stand said shut shall hid while who



Come, boys, what shall we do? Let us play hide and seek.

O yes! that will be fun for all of us. Who will shut his eyes? Ned, will you?

Yes, I will shut my eyes while you all go and hide.

Well, Ned, you stand by that tree.

Then Ned shut his eyes and the boys ran off to hide. Pretty soon Ned said, "Boys, are you all hid? Yes? Well, here I go. One, two, three, look out for me."



LESSON XLV.

NEW WORDS.

Frank Fred must black find barn cap ha spy



The boys are all hid. Now I must try to find them. Ha! I spy you, Fred. You are in that box.

I spy you, Roy. You are under the hay.

I can not find Frank.

O there he is! I spy you, Frank.

Come out of that barn. I see your black cap.

Fred, you must shut your eyes now, and stand by the tree while we hide.

I will, boys. You go and hide.



LESSON XLVI

NEW WORDS.

so bath sick please tub wrap shawl sis'ter

Now, Ned, please do not put my kitty into the bath tub.

Yes, sister, I must give her a bath. Here is the bath tub with some nice warm water.

But, Ned, kitty will get sick if you put her into the water. She will take cold.



No, I will wrap her well in the big shawl, and then she can not take cold.

So Ned gave kitty a bath, and then put her into the nice warm shawl.



LESSON XLVII.

NEW WORDS.

pass po'ny whip keep fast'er use go'ing than yours



Hold on, Frank, you are going too fast. I can not keep up with you.

Use your whip, Fred, and make your pony go faster. Come up to me and we will have a race.

Well, here we go. Hurrah, hurrah! Go on, pony, as fast as you can, and we will catch Frank.

We are going faster now, Frank, and will pass you in the race. No, Fred, you can not pass me, for my pony can run faster than yours.

Well, we will see if he can.



LESSON XLVIII.

READING REVIEW.

Who said play hide and seek?

I did, Frank.

Well, shut your eyes, Ned, while we go and hide.

Shall I stand by this tree, boys?

Yes, we will hide, and then you must try to find us.

Well, go and hide.

One, two, three, four, five, six—look out for me, hoys.

Here I come. Ha! I see your black cap, Frank. Come out of that barn.

I spy you, Roy. You are hid under the hay; and there is Fred in the box.

Now, Frank, you shut your eyes.

No, Fred, there is my pony, and I am going to take a ride.

Well, I will get my pony, and ride too. Shall we have a race?

Yes, but my pony can run faster than yours.

If I use my whip, I can keep up with you, and I may pass you.

But there is my sister. I must go and see her. What is it, sister?

Please put this shawl over me, Fred. Wrap me up well, for it is pretty cold.

So kitty did not get sick, did she, sister?

O no! kitty is well, but she does not like the bath tub, Fred.



LESSON XLIX.

SPELLING REVIEW.

sō hä hĭd ū[s][e] tŭb spȳ ȼăp said (sĕd) sĭ[c]k fīnd pȧs[s] [w]ho sē[e]k [t-h]ĕn shŭt [t-h]ăn bȧth bärn kē[e]p shăl[l] Frĕd whĭp [w]răp mŭst stănd blă[c]k [y][o]ūr[s] pō'ny whīl[e] sha[w]l sĭs'tẽr plē[a][s][e] ḡō'ĭng fȧst'ẽr Frănk

SCRIPT EXERCISE.

[Script: Where did Roy hide?

Frank hid in the _.

Frank had a _ cap.

Now, Fred, you must shut your _.]



LESSON L.

NEW WORDS.

bear legs paws a fraid' stick hind holds stands



O Frank, look at that big dog!

It is not a dog, Fred. It is a black bear.

Are you not afraid of him, Frank?

No, he will not hurt us. Do you not see the man feed him from his hand? What a funny bear! See, Frank, how he stands up on his hind legs, and holds the stick in his paws! Is he strong, Frank?

Yes, he is very strong, and his fur coat is warm.

Where did the man get him, Frank?

I do not know. We will go and ask him.



LESSON LI.

NEW WORDS.

were things caught hunt'ing sir dance fell dogs cut

How do you do, sir?

How do you do, boys?

You have a nice bear there, sir. We like to see him play. Where did you get him?

I was hunting with my dogs, and saw a little bear up in a tree.

I cut the tree down, and as soon as it fell, the dogs and I caught him.



Were you not afraid of him?

O no! he was too small to hurt me then.

You like to see him play, do you?

Yes, sir. What can he do?

He can hold a stick in his paws, dance very well on his hind legs, and do many other funny things.



LESSON LII.

NEW WORDS.

fro long mous'ie run'ning a go' silk al'ways com'ing time glow spied



1. I have a little kitty, Her fur is white as snow. In the barn she likes to play, Running to and fro.

2. In the barn a little mousie, A long time ago, Saw my little kitty coming, Running to and fro.

3. Two black eyes has little kitty, Eyes that always glow, And she spied the little mousie, Running to and fro.

4. Four soft paws has little kitty, Soft as silk, I know, And they caught the little mousie, Running to and fro.

SCRIPT EXERCISE.

[Script: Ann is a good girl.]



LESSON LIII.

READING REVIEW.

Mamma', did you see the kitty catch the little mousie in the barn?

Yes, kitty spied the mousie running to and fro.

I saw her pretty black eyes glow, and soon she caught the mousie in her paws.

What a pretty kitty she is! Her fur is like silk.

But look, mamma'! There is the man coming with his bear. May I go out to see him?

Yes, Fred, but Frank must go with you.

How well the bear stands up on his hind legs!

Yes, and see how he holds the stick in his paws.

O see him dance! What funny things he does! Where did the man get him, Frank? Did you ask him?

Yes, and he said that one time, a long while ago, he and his dogs were out hunting, and saw the bear up in a tree.

The bear was small then, so he was not afraid of him.

He cut the tree down, and as soon as it fell, the dogs caught the bear.

Did they hurt him, Frank?

No, the man did not let them hurt him.

See, Frank, the man is coming here.

How do you do, boys?

How do you do, sir?

We like to see your bear play. We think he likes you.

O yes! he likes me, for I always take good care of him.



LESSON LIV.

SPELLING REVIEW.

frō ḡlō[w] hīnd ȼa[u][g][h]t ȧ ḡō' tīm[e] wẽr[e] ȧ frā[i]d' sĩr lŏng spī[e]d al'wa[y][s] ȼŭt sĭlk hōld[s] mous'ĭ[e] lĕḡ[s] b[e]r dȧn[c5][e] ȼȯm'ĭng dŏḡ[s] pa[w][s] thĭng[s] rŭn'nĭng fĕl[l] stĭ[c]k stănd[s] hŭnt'ĭng

SCRIPT EXERCISE.

[Script: What did the man see in a tree? How did the man get the bear down?]

* * * * *

PART II

SHORT STORIES.

* * * * *



LESSON I.

NEW WORDS.

Jŏ[h]n sĕt jŭst wĕnt Dĭ[c]k hōl[e] trăp quĭ[c]k



VOWEL EXERCISE.

ă ăn ănd hănd stănd ăt răt ȼăt ȼătch hăt

John and his cat Dick do not like rats. They catch all they can. One time, John set a trap to catch some, and then went away and hid with Dick.

Pretty soon a big rat came out of its hole and went to the trap.

Dick saw the rat, and made a start to get away from John. But John said, "Hold on, Dick, let us see if it will go into the trap."

But the rat did not go in, and as it was going to run away, John let Dick go, and said, "Catch it, Dick. Run quick, quick!" and they ran very fast to catch the rat.

But the rat was too quick for them. It went into its hole just as Dick was very near it.

SCRIPT EXERCISE.

[Script: Jŏ[h]n līk[e] ȼām[e] Dĭ[c]k hōl[e] mād[e] ]



LESSON II.

NEW WORDS.

pĕts sĕnd l[)oo]ks ȼāġ[e] yĕt sĕnt ȼrĕst whĕn tām[e] sĭng

VOWEL EXERCISE.

ĕ ĕnd sĕnd sĕnt nĕst lĕt sĕt gĕt yĕt rĕd



Mary, where did you get your pretty redbirds?

Fred sent them to me.

Did he send the cage too?

No, mamma' gave me the cage.

What nice pets the birds will be! Are they tame, Mary?

Not yet, but I think they soon will be. They let me set food near them now.

When they are tame, you can let them out of the cage.

What a funny cap one of them has!

It looks like a cap, Mary, but it is not. It is a crest.

Many redbirds have no crest, and I am glad that one of your birds has one.

Will these birds sing well?

They sing very little. Redbirds are pretty, but they do not sing so well as some other birds.

SCRIPT EXERCISE.

[Script: är[e] al[l] hăv[e] wĭl[l] ȼāġ[e] ḡāv[e]]



LESSON III.

NEW WORDS.

dĭp fĭsh trout br[)oo]k nĕt lĭv[e] dĭsh wĭsh ȼọ[u][l]d

VOWEL EXERCISE.

ĭ ĭn ĭn'to ĭ[s] hĭ[s] ĭsh dĭsh fĭsh wĭsh



Look, mamma'! See what a pretty fish! It is a little trout.

Where did you get it, John?

Frank caught it in the brook.

I went to dip a dish into the brook to get some water, and saw this little fish.

Then I said, "O Frank, look, look quick! See the little fish!"

Frank saw it, and ran to get his fish net. He put the net into the water, and caught the fish, and I put it into this dish.

"Well, what will you do with it?

I will keep it, mamma'.

But, my boy, it will not live in that dish. Put it back into the brook.

I wish I could keep it. It is so pretty! May I put it into the pond?

No, John. You must put it into the brook. A trout will not live in warm water.

SCRIPT EXERCISE.

[Script: sa[w] lĭv[e] bă[c]k whêr[e] ȼọ[u][l]d ȼa[u][g][h]t]



LESSON IV.

NEW WORDS

ḡŏt jŏl'ly rŏmp brĕ[a]d fŏx ē[a]t fŏnd ȧft'ẽr mē[a]t

VOWEL EXERCISE.

ŏ ŏx bŏx fŏx dŏḡ nŏt tŏp



John, where did you get your fox?

I caught him in a trap, when he was small.

Is he tame now?

O yes! and he is very fond of me. We romp, and play, and have a jolly time with each other.

What do you give him to eat?

I give him meat and bread.

Can a fox run fast, John?

Yes. My fox can run very fast. A little while ago, Frank was here with his dog Rover. The fox was afraid of Rover, and ran away.



When Rover saw the fox start, he ran after him. O how they did go! They ran and ran, up hill, and down hill, but the fox ran faster than Rover, and got away.

How did you get him back?

O when Rover went away, he soon came back to me. I do not let dogs run after him now.

SCRIPT EXERCISE.

[Script: mē[a]t smal[l] whīt[e] brĕ[a]d hid[e] jŏlly ]



LESSON V.

NEW WORDS.

Jān[e] ȼŭp jŭmp rōp[e] tā'bl[e] mĭlk mŭch lŭnch châ[i]r bŭt'tẽr



VOWEL EXERCISE.

ŭ ŭt ŭp bŭt ȼŭp ȼŭt pŭp shŭt ḡŭn tŭb fŭn rŭb

O Jane! I am glad you have your doll with you. How pretty it is!

Yes, Mary, I think it is a pretty doll. I like it very much. You are just in time for lunch. We will have it here on my little table.

O that will be jolly fun, Mary! I will set the table, and put on your little dishes.

Yes, Jane, you set the table, and I will run and ask mamma' for some bread and butter and cold meat.

Get a cup of milk, too, Mary.

Yes, here they are—bread, butter, cold meat, and a cup of nice milk.

Well, here is a chair for you, one for me, and one for my doll.

What shall we do after lunch?

We will jump rope, Mary. I have a nice new rope.

O so have I! Mamma' just gave me one.

But, Mary, we must not jump rope too much. It is not good for us.

Well, we will jump but a little while, and then I must go home.

SCRIPT EXERCISE.

[Script: nī[c5]e dŏl[l] nē[a]r rōp[e] châ[i]r thêr[e] ]



LESSON VI.

NEW WORDS.

dā[y] lāk[e] stā[y] hōm[e] wā[y] lāt[e] swĭm splăsh mouth răb'bĭt

VOWEL EXERCISE.

ā dā[y] sā[y] mā[y] hā[y] tāk[e] māk[e] māk[e]s tām[e] ȼām[e]

One day Ann and Frank went to the lake with Rover.

Rover can swim well, so Frank made him go into the water after a stick.

"Jump, Rover! Jump in and get the stick," said Frank; and into the water he went with a big splash.



Pretty soon he came out with the stick in his mouth.

He did not like the fun so well as Frank, for the water was a little cold.

They had a fine time for a while with Rover, and then set out for home, as it was late in the day, and they could not stay long.

On the way home, Rover saw a rabbit, and away he went after it, as fast as he could go.

Ann and Frank ran too, but could not keep up with Rover and the rabbit.

When they got home, Rover was there, and Frank said—

"Where is the rabbit, Rover?"

Rover gave Frank a funny look and went away.

"O I know!" said Frank, "the rabbit ran so fast you could not catch it."

SCRIPT EXERCISE.

[Script: dā[y] lāk[e] hōm[e] stĭ[c]k [k]nō[w] kē[e]p]



LESSON VII.



NEW WORDS.

sē[a] ē[a]'ḡl[e] bē[a]k bē[a]ch lärġ[e] wọ[u][l]d want lär'ġẽr

VOWEL EXERCISE.

ē mē wē bē hē shē ē[a]t bē[a]t mē[a]t sē[e] sē[e]k sē[e]m

Look, sister! See that eagle!

Yes, Frank, I see two eagles. What large wings they have!

Yes, they fly over the beach to find fish.

Do they eat fish, Frank?

Yes, they are very fond of fish. The eagle is a large and strong bird. Mamma' saw one take up a rabbit and fly off with it.

I wish we could catch one, Frank. How funny it would look in a cage!

Yes, sister, but you would have to get a much larger cage than the one your redbirds have.

O I am afraid it would hurt me. If it got out of the cage, it would fly away with me.

No, it could not do that, but it could hurt you with its strong beak.

What is its beak, Frank?

The beak is its mouth. All birds have a beak, but not many have one so strong as that of the eagle.

SCRIPT EXERCISE.

[Script: ē[a]t [y][o]ū wo[u][l]d t[w]o tāk[e] ē[a]ḡl[e] ]



LESSON VIII.

NEW WORDS.

ī[c5][e] kīnd tīr[e]d drīv[e] fär fīr[e] skāt[e] mīl[e][s] sĕv'[e]n



VOWEL EXERCISE.

ī ī[c5][e] nī[c5][e] fīnd kīnd rīd[e] sīd[e]

You are very kind, Mary, to have a nice fire for me. I am cold after my long drive.

Yes, Fred, you look cold and tired, but you will soon get warm by this fire. How far did you drive?

Seven miles, and the snow and ice made it a cold ride.

Can we skate on the lake now, Fred?

Yes, the ice is strong. We can have a good skate. Do you want to go and try it?

O yes, Fred! I like to skate. Will you go with me?

Yes, as soon as I get warm. But John and Ann are coming over to see us.

Well, Fred, we will ask them to go with us. Ann likes to skate.

O yes! if they go, we shall have a merry time.

What fun it will be, Fred! I will run now and find my hat. We will go as soon as they come.

SCRIPT EXERCISE.

[Script: [y][o]ūr mīl[e]s skāt[e] dṛīv[e] sha[w]l sĕv[e]n ]



LESSON IX.

NEW WORDS.

rōll ȼō[a]t bō[a]t blō[w][s] tĕl[l] pȧ pä' wĭnd wāv[e][s] ȼăp't[a]ĭn dăsh[e]d lẽ[a]rn[e]d



VOWEL EXERCISE.

ō ōld ȼōld hōld nō snō[w] sō ḡō [k]nō[w]

Papa', I want to sail in the new boat. Will you take me out?

It is pretty cold, Frank. See how the wind blows, and how the waves roll on the beach. I know it is cold, papa', but I have on a warm coat.

Well, come on. I will hold the boat while you get in.

So Frank and his papa' got into the boat and put up the sail.

The waves were very high, but Frank was not afraid. The boat was strong, and his papa' could sail it well.

The waves dashed over the side of the boat, but the more they dashed, the more fun it was for Frank.

When Frank got to be a man, he was so fond of the water that he went to sea in a large ship.

He learned how to sail the ship, and after a while, he was made captain of it.

He is an old man now, and likes to tell little boys and girls all he learned and saw while he was captain of a ship.

SCRIPT EXERCISE.

[Script: sā[i]l bō[a]t ȼō[a]t blō[w]s wāv[e][s] lẽ[a]rn[e]d ]



LESSON X.

NEW WORDS.

tūn[e] flūt[e] ū[s][e]d mīn[e] mū'[s]ĭȼ plā[y][e]d sȼ[h][=oo]l ȧ ḡain' (ḡĕn')

VOWEL EXERCISE.

ū ū[s][e] ū[s][e]d ū[s]'ĭng

One day, when Frank and John were going to school, they saw an old man with a flute.

"Will you please play a tune for us, sir?" said Frank.

"Yes, boys, I will play for you. Are you fond of music?" "Yes, sir, we like music. You used to play your flute when I went with mamma' to see you."

"O you are the little boy who had your flute with you, are you?"



"Yes, sir, and I have learned to play a little on it."

"Well, I am glad to see you again, my boy.

"I will play you a tune, and then you must play for me."

"But my flute is at home, sir."

"O well, you can use mine. It is a good one."

The old man played a tune for the boys, and then gave the flute to Frank to play.

Frank played a tune, and did it very well.

"How well you play!" said the old man.

"You are very kind to say that, but I wish I could play as well as you do," said Frank.

"O you will soon do that. All you will have to do is to try."

SCRIPT EXERCISE.

[Script: sē[e] ūs[e]d tūn[e] flūt[e] plē[a]s[e] plā[y][e]d ]



PEARLS IN VERSE.[A]

Be the matter what it may, Always speak the truth. If at work, or if at play, Always speak the truth.

* * * * *

Do your best, your very best, And do it every day. Little boys and little girls, That is the wisest way.

* * * * *

Little children, love each other, Never give another pain, If your brother speak in anger, Answer not in wrath again.

* * * * *

Early to bed and early to rise, Make men healthy, wealthy, and wise.

[Footnote A: It is intended that these selections shall be memorized by pupils, but as they do not form any part of the reading lessons, the words not heretofore used are not regarded as "new words."]

Suppose your task, my little man, Is very hard to get? Will it make it any easier For you to sit and fret? Then wouldn't it he wiser Than waiting like a dunce, To go to work in earnest, And learn the thing at once?

* * * * *

Speak the truth, and speak it ever, Cost it what it will; He who hides the wrong he did, Does the wrong thing still.

* * * * *

To do to others as I would That they should do to me, Will make me honest, kind, and good, As children ought to be.

* * * * *

When mother says, "Do this," or "that," Don't say, "What for?" and "Why?" But let her hear your gentle voice Say, "Mother dear, I'll try."



PHONIC CHART.

VOWELS.

ā as in lāke ē as in bē ŏ as in bŏx ă " " ăt ĕ " " lĕt ū " " ū[s]e ä " " fär ẽ " " hẽr ŭ " " ŭp a " " all ī " " ī[c5]e û " " fûr â " " ȼâre ĭ " " ĭn [=oo] " " t[=oo] ȧ " " ȧsk ō " " sō [)oo] " " l[)oo]k

DIPHTHONGS.

oi, oy (unmarked), as in oil, boy ou, ow " " " out, now

CONSONANTS.

b as in băd m as in mē y as in yĕs d " " do n " " nō z " " frōze f " " fŏx p " " pụt ng " " sĭng ḡ " " ḡō r " " răt ch " " chĭȼk h " " hē s " " sō sh " " shē j " " jŭst t " " t[=oo] th " " thĭnk k " " kīte v " " vĕry th " " [t-h]ē l " " lĕt w " " wē wh (hw), " whạt

EQUIVALENTS.

VOWELS.

ạ like ŏ as in whạt ȯ like ŭ as in ȼȯme ê " â " " whêre ô " a " " fôr e " ā " " they õ " û " " wõrk ĩ " ẽ " " gĩrl ụ, ọ " [)oo] " " pụt, ȼọuld ï " ē " " polï[c5]e ȳ " ī " " bȳ o, u, " [=oo] " " to, rule y " ĭ " " kĭt'ty

CONSONANTS.

[c5] like s as in rā[c5]e ġ like j as in ȼāġe ȼ " k " " ȼăt n " ng " " think ȼh " k " " sȼhool [s] " z " " hă[s] [c5]h " sh " " ma[c5]hine x " ks " " bŏx [x] like gz as in e[x]ist

THE END

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