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What's in

The

NEW YORK EVENING JOURNAL

America's Greatest Evening Newspaper

A Booklet that tells what is in the New York Evening Journal and why it has had the largest evening newspaper circulation in America for Twenty-Nine consecutive years.

NEW YORK EVENING JOURNAL NEW YORK U.S.A.

NEW YORK EVENING JOURNAL

The Greatest Circulation of any Evening Newspaper in America and a Quality Circulation at Three Cents a Copy Daily and Five Cents Saturday.

Copyright, 1928 NEW YORK EVENING JOURNAL



FOREWORD

Thirty-three years ago the New York Evening Journal was introduced to New York under its present ownership.

Improvements have been constant. The aim has been to give the public a better and still better newspaper, to make the New York Evening Journal more attractive and interesting to every member of the family.

Today, this newspaper is read by the greatest number of men and women in all income groups. It goes into the homes of the highest earning and largest spending classes, reaching the worthwhile families of New York City and its suburbs.

The New York Evening Journal, through its National and International News and Feature Services, has access to more of the very best and highest paid experts, writers, artists and contributors in every department of newspaper publishing than any evening newspaper in America outside the Hearst organization.

For the past quarter of a century the New York Evening Journal has attracted the largest readership of any evening newspaper in the United States on the sound principle of greatest service to the greatest number of men and women in every substantial walk of life.

Talent, the most expert and brilliant that money can attract, as exemplified throughout the pages of this booklet, gives you the secret of READER INTEREST and READER CONFIDENCE in the New York Evening Journal—an overwhelming PUBLIC PREFERENCE over one hundred per cent greater than the next largest standard size evening newspaper in New York City.

NEW YORK EVENING JOURNAL.



Mr. Brisbane writes editorials for the New York Evening Journal and has done so for many years. His daily editorials are one of the outstanding reasons why nearly half of all the people in Metropolitan New York, who buy any New York evening paper, buy the New York Evening Journal every day.



ACCURACY

THE FIRST LAW OF THE NEWS

"Get it FIRST, but first get it RIGHT"

THE SLOGAN OF

New York Evening Journal News Gathering Staff

All through its local news staff as well as through the International News Service Staff the gospel of GET IT RIGHT is stressed and reiterated twenty-four hours in the day. The man who can't get the habit of ACCURACY can't stay in this organization though he be the most brilliant writer living. "Get it FIRST but first get it RIGHT" is at once a fearless challenge and a solemn pledge of faith.



One of the outstanding editors of America. Born on Manhattan Island and for many years active in newspaper work in New York City. His experience also includes editorial direction of newspapers in Chicago, San Francisco, Los Angeles, Atlanta and Boston. He knows the pulse of humanity and what pleases and interests the greatest number of intelligent people throughout New York City and suburbs.



EDITORIAL AND REPORTORIAL EXECUTIVE STAFF



NEWS PICTURES

WHAT THE CAMERA'S EYE SEES

One good picture is worth ten thousand words, says an old proverb. The Evening Journal is invariably FIRST in serving its readers with accurate, informative, illuminating and exclusive news pictures. Each picture must pass the scrutiny of the most critical staff of experts to be good enough for reproduction in the Evening Journal. New Yorkers know they get better and more interesting pictures in the Evening Journal than in any other New York newspaper.



SPEED

MEANS LIFE TO THE NEWS

You may have the news beat of a century on your desk. Hold it a half hour too long—long enough for another paper to print it FIRST—and for you it is YESTERDAY'S NEWS with all the LIFE ebbed out of it.

The News Policy of the NEW YORK EVENING JOURNAL can be summarized in five sentences:

Give all the vital news of the moment. Give it cleanly. Give it accurately. Give it interestingly. Give it succinctly.

Back of this clean-cut, vigorous policy of news presentation is the finest reportorial and editorial talent that money can buy.

Local news printed in the New York Evening Journal is furnished by the most adequate staff of reporters and special writers retained by any evening newspaper in the city.

Telegraphic news is furnished by the International News Service—with well equipped offices not only in New York but in Washington, London, Paris, Rome, Moscow, Peking—with expert representatives all over the world. In New York City's evening newspaper field International News Service serves the New York Evening Journal exclusively.



LARGEST AND HIGHEST PAID LOCAL NEWS STAFF IN NEW YORK CITY

"Get it FIRST, but first get it RIGHT"—that is the slogan of the New York Evening Journal's news-gathering staff. This newspaper employs the largest staff of men and women reporters, photographers, and news writers of any evening newspaper in America. It pays the highest salaries and this policy attracts the most capable and brilliant talent.



INTERNATIONAL NEWS SERVICE REPORTS NEWS OF THE WORLD FOR EVENING JOURNAL READERS

International News Service has firmly established itself as the dominant press service in the afternoon newspaper field. Its news dispatches, gathered from every corner of the universe, likewise are published in newspapers throughout the civilized world. International News Service is truly international in scope, linking the foremost nations in a comprehensive news-gathering and news-distributing chain.

Approximately 60,000 miles of leased wire, used and controlled by International News Service, distributes its news reports to the Evening Journal alone in New York and to more than 500 other daily newspapers in the United States. By cable and radio International News Service dispatches are sent to sixteen foreign nations in both hemispheres. Editors of the leading newspapers in Germany, Great Britain, Italy, Spain, Japan, Norway, Switzerland, Sweden, Brazil, Chile, Argentina and numerous other countries place the same reliance upon the International News Service reports as do the editors of leading American afternoon dailies.

International News Service is operated under the able General Managership of Frank Mason, former chief of the Paris Bureau.

Collection and preparation of its news reports is in the hands of a highly trained staff of editors and correspondents. This staff is directed by Barry Faris, General News Manager, who has had more than a dozen years' experience in press association work and knows thoroughly every detail of the service.

George R. Holmes heads a large staff at Washington. Holmes, himself, is an outstanding authority on news from the National capital, a keen observer, a vivid writer. William K. Hutchinson, Kenneth Clark, George Durno, Lawrence Sullivan and William S. Neal are members of the Washington corps whose achievements have made them widely known to newspaper editors and readers throughout the United States.

Copeland C. Burg, in Chicago, Ellis H. Martin in San Francisco and other staff men in all the leading cities in the United States get the news for International News Service and write it in individualistic style for New York Evening Journal readers.

The International News Service Foreign Staff is a large one. Harry K. Reynolds, Director of Foreign Service, with headquarters in New York, was formerly Manager of the London bureau, and he knows intimately every phase of the foreign service. Harry R. Flory, Manager in London; Frederic K. Abbott, Manager in Paris, and Otto D. Tolischus, Manager in Berlin, not only have done noteworthy work in covering the big news stories themselves, but direct a network of correspondents in their respective territories that literally covers the world for International News Service. Edward L. Deuss in Moscow, Guglielmo Emanuel in Rome and Harold Ballou in Madrid are capable members of the foreign staff who know their fields thoroughly. Correspondents are maintained as well in China, Japan, the Philippines, various South American countries and elsewhere at strategic points for news coverage.

International News Service correspondents at home and abroad have only one rule to guide them. That is to get the news and get it right. Generally, as well, they get it FIRST for New York Evening Journal readers.



BIG NEWS

TWO DAYS IN ADVANCE!

The story of three men in the Arctic.

Above them the cold, gray sky, washed by an impenetrable fog.

Around them only crashing icebergs, each second grinding out a new variety of the age-old Arctic death threat.

One man injured, unable to continue.

Then the story of the dying man who consigned himself to an icy grave that his mates might save themselves. And the story of the two men who, faced with this dilemma, left their pal to die, alone with his thoughts. Leering icebergs grinding out the death march.

This is the story of Dr. Finn Malmgren and Captains Marianno and Zappi.

It first became known to the world when the New York Evening Journal printed International News Service dispatches via Moscow on Friday, July 13, 1928. The Evening Journal's headlines then read:

"MALMGREN DESERTED BY MATES; NOT DEAD WHEN ABANDONED"

It wasn't until Sunday, July 15, that other New York papers printed the gripping story the Evening Journal had given New York on Friday, July 13.

The Evening Journal is always ACCURATE—and FIRST



INTERNATIONAL NEWS SERVICE COVERS THE EARTH

Throughout the World—covering both hemispheres—International News Service correspondents report important news for New York Evening Journal readers. Here is an outstanding staff of national and international news gatherers:

NEW YORK OFFICE

FRANK E. MASON, General Manager BARRY FARIS, General News Manager GEORGE T. HARGREAVES, General Business Manager

James L. Kilgallen Richard Chaplin David P. Sentner Davis J. Walsh W.S. Cousins Hubert Malkus Theodore B. Goetz William J. Kostka Henry Caron Robert Wallace Les Conklin Barney Mullady

UNITED STATES (Branch Offices)

ALBANY—RAY BORST, Bureau Manager ATLANTA—JOHN NIMICK, Bureau Manager BOSTON—HERBERT CARYL, Bureau Manager CHICAGO-COPELAND C. BURG, News Manager CHICAGO—W.S. BRONS, Regional Director CLEVELAND—C.D. HAWKINS, Bureau Manager COLUMBUS—EDWARD MAYL, Bureau Manager DENVER—M.F. DACEY, Bureau Manager DES MOINES—DON P. DROHAN, Bureau Manager DETROIT—W.R. STOKLEY, Bureau Manager FORT WORTH—T.J. O'CONNELL, Bureau Manager HARRISBURG—C.B. YORKE, Bureau Manager INDIANAPOLIS—JOHN A. CEJNAR, State Manager KANSAS CITY—ROBERT JAMES, Bureau Manager LOS ANGELES—HARRY BERGMAN, Bureau Manager MEMPHIS—NULL ADAMS, Bureau Manager MINNEAPOLIS—O.A. ROSENHAUER, Bureau Manager NEW HAVEN—R.T. BULKELEY, Bureau Manager PHILADELPHIA—E.L. RAWLEY, Bureau Manager PITTSBURGH—S.I. NEIMAN, State Manager PORTLAND—GEORGE L. SCOTT, Bureau Manager RALEIGH—HENRY LESESNE, Bureau Manager ST. LOUIS—ROBERT W. GINSBURG, Bureau Manager SAN FRANCISCO—ELLIS H. MARTIN, Bureau Manager SPRINGFIELD—LOUIS J. HUMPHREY, Bureau Manager

WASHINGTON, D.C.

GEORGE R. HOLMES, News Manager KENNETH CLARK, Assistant News Manager

William K. Hutchinson George E. Durno Lawrence Sullivan William S. Neal Robert S. Thornburg Harry Ward Pierce Miller Cole Morgan Arthur T. Newberry

FOREIGN SERVICE

NEW YORK— HARRY K. REYNOLDS, Director FRANK CHARLTON, Cable Editor A.E. FRADENBURGH, LES FINKELSTEIN

LONDON— HARRY R. FLORY, Manager F.A. WRAY, J.C. OESTREICHER, CHAS. A. SMITH, J. KINGSBURY SMITH, ETHEL MARSHALL

PARIS— FREDERICK K. ABBOTT, Manager ROBERT W. THOMPSON

BERLIN— OTTO D. TOLISCHUS, Manager WALTER DIETZEL, BARON VON WOELLWARTH, ERIC BOY

ROME—GUGLIELMO EMANUEL MOSCOW—EDWARD L. DEUSS MADRID—HAROLD BALLOU VIENNA—ALFRED TRYNAUER SOFIA—CONSTANTINE STEPHANOVE BRUSSELS—GEORGE A. DETRY PRAGUE—L. ALLETRINO BELGRADE—DR. W.A. MORRISON RIGA—HARRY HIRSCHFELD LISBON—A. FREIPAS DA CAMARA SHANGHAI—ALFRED MEYER PEKING—JOHN ANDREWS GOETTE TOKYO—JAMES YOUNG MANILA—HIRAM MERRIMAN HONOLULU—E.P. IRWIN COLOMBO—VINCENT DE SILVA CAIRO—P.S. TAYLOR ALLAHABAD—J.H. THORNLEY BOMBAY—C.S. DE ANDRADE CAPE TOWN—FRANK BURTON NAIROBI—JOHN MACNAB WELLINGTON—F.W. SIMMONDS SIDNEY—J.G. PATON BUENOS AIRES—DAN CAREY RIO DE JANEIRO—ARROXELLAS GALVAO SANTIAGO—ROBERTO GATTICA HAVANA—A.D. ROBERTS REYKJAVIK—AXEL THORSTEINSON



Few women have attained pre-eminence in Journalism. Mary T. Dougherty is outstanding among the few. Her life's work is dedicated to promoting greater happiness, greater opportunity and greater influence for women. She knows America's great women, leaders in social, educational, civic and political spheres. She devotes all her knowledge, experience and ability to keeping the Evening Journal overwhelmingly FIRST as a home newspaper.



Thorough newspaper man who has grown up with the Bronx and uptown New York. Writes editorials on local topics. Conducts "'ROUND UPTOWN" column. Edits a real neighborhood section.

Every day over 122,000 copies of the Evening Journal sold above 110th Street in Harlem, Bronx, Washington Heights and Westchester County include this section.



A "Dyed-in-the-Wool" Brooklynite from cradle to editorial chair. Associated with Brooklyn newspapers for many years. Prominent in Brooklyn's civic, social and commercial life. Edits a section of real local news for Kings, Queens and Nassau Counties.

Every day over 234,000 copies of the Evening Journal include this section, which is thoroughly read in Long Island homes.



He knows the problems of the human race. Simplicity of thought and staunch adherence to an uncompromising philosophy of optimism distinguish the work of Dr. Frank Crane. His writings are helpful, encouraging, inspirational. His followers are legion. Thousands of Evening Journal readers in New York City and suburbs look forward to his daily articles. His wisdom marks the paths for a happy life.



"Billy Benedick" ... who is he? He is a member of the most exclusive and highly placed society set of New York. His newsy quips and chatter about the doings of socially prominent men and women have established one of the most extensively read Society News Pages in New York. "Billy Benedick's" identity is kept secret as his work would obviously be handicapped were it to be made public.



Elsie Robinson is, like Dr. Crane, a philosopher ... but one would hardly call her gentle. She is brisk, though never brusque in setting forth her views. She likes to jog people out of mental ruts and, judging by her tremendous popularity among the countless thousands of Evening Journal readers throughout New York City and its suburbs, they like to have her do it. Her advice is sound and well taken.



Often referred to as America's "Bernard Shaw," and as America's wittiest woman. Satire sparkles through her writings. Her observations on the foibles of men and women, the joys and sorrows of love and marriage, and the relief or the lack of it in divorce are always brilliant and entertaining, yet always "said with a smile." Helen, like George Cohan, says: "I always leave 'em laughing when I say good-bye."



Thorough familiarity with the investment securities market has established him as an authority. Accuracy and informed judgment characterize his reports. In close contact with the financial world, he delves into the resources and development of corporate business. A keen student of finance, he is qualified to give sound and unbiased advice to countless thousands of Evening Journal readers annually.

DURING 1927

12,000

NEW YORK EVENING JOURNAL

readers addressed letters to

"WILLIAM WRIGHT"

Seeking advice on investment problems

An analysis of these 12,000 inquiries disclosed that 63% had a total of about $25,000,000 actually on hand for investment or already invested in securities.

21% specified definite sums of money available for immediate investment—totaling approximately $10,000,000.

42% gave lists of securities already held, the market value conservatively estimated at $15,000,000.

More than 1,000 New York Evening Journal readers continue to write in every month for help in solving their problems. "William Wright" is giving these readers his helpful and expert advice every day, from his vast store of financial knowledge.



Good things to eat, recipes for cakes, pies and a variety of tempting dishes, appetizing menus, economical marketing, preserving—all these are a part of Ruth Mason's articles in the Evening Journal. Tens of thousands of housewives read Ruth Mason's helpful articles regularly and write to her for advice. Additional thousands listen-in to her cooking lectures broadcast over WHN and WPAP.

ONE ANNOUNCEMENT

on the

Evening Journal Cooking Page

BROUGHT 14,000 LETTERS

from Evening Journal Readers to

RUTH MASON

Requesting copies of a New Cook Book issued by the Bureau of Home Economics of the U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Washington, D.C.

[Illustration:

A New Cook Book for All Evening Journal Readers

The New York Evening Journal, hoping to render a real public service, has made arrangement with the Bureau of Home Economics of the United States Department of Agriculture, at Washington, D.C., to distribute, free of charge, a new cook book that will be of service to all busy housewives.

It contains eighty-six pages, including seventy different menus and three hundred recipes, each and every one written and tested by the most eminent food experts in the United States.

There is a copy for every Journal reader and at no cost.

Just write Miss Ruth Mason, Evening Journal Cooking Expert, No. 2 Columbus Circle, and ask her to send you a copy of the new cook book.

For the convenience of busy housewives we attach a coupon below:

MISS RUTH MASON, Evening Journal Cooking Expert, Care Evening Journal, No. 2 Columbus Circle, NEW YORK CITY.

DEAR MISS MASON:

Please send me a copy of the new cook book containing seventy menus and three hundred recipes.

Name Street address City State

Reproduction in reduced size, of announcement from the Evening Journal Cooking Page.]



Ranked by the great masters of music as one of the most brilliant metropolitan reviewers. A music critic in the fullest sense. His opinions are distinguished alike for their soundness and the wit with which they are expressed. Irving Weil has reviewed for Evening Journal readers all the great and near great musical events for over fifteen years. He has the confidence of a legion of music lovers among the largest audience of evening newspaper readers in America.



John Anderson writes entertainingly and authoritatively on the drama. He tells what a play is about and then gives his own reactions. He does not belong to the "let-us-pat-each-other-on-the-back" school of critics, but devotes his column daily to interesting discussions of what is actually happening in the world of the theatre. Mr. Anderson was formerly on the Evening Post and is recognized as the highest type of drama writer in New York.



Acknowledged by producers, directors, film stars and the public alike as an authority on the silver screen art. Her clever articles on motion pictures and personalities in the movie world are the best of their kind published in New York. Tens of thousands of fans read what Rose Pelswick says in the Evening Journal every day and "listen-in" on her Radio Movie Club programmes over WHN and WPAP.



A twentieth century exemplar of the famous Greek philosopher, Epicurus, acknowledged authority on the art of good eating. Mr. Hoftyzer is a modern day food expert who stresses the importance of pure foods and explains the principles of nourishment which promote life and health. His timely articles on marketing, what to buy and when to buy, are followed regularly by housewives in the Evening Journal homes.



To see and set down as no other artist of her generation does is Nell Brinkley's unique and amazing gift. Every picture has a charm and distinction all its own. Evening Journal readers love Nell Brinkley—she has made their lives happy with beautiful thoughts which radiate from her fascinating portrayals of romance and life. Nell Brinkley's drawings and romantic descriptions appear regularly in the Evening Journal's daily Magazine Page.



Formerly associated with the American Banking Institute and now Financial Editor of International News Service, he is one of America's recognized experts on finance and business. He writes interestingly, informatively and authoritatively on the big financial subjects of the moment. His daily articles in the New York Evening Journal have attracted a vast audience of readers throughout New York City and its suburbs interested in business and finance.



Unquestionably the greatest cartoonist of the age. His pen combines the master strokes of the artist and a broad knowledge of politics and public affairs. He gives Evening Journal readers the "high lights" of the news of the day and portrays unerringly the virtue or villainy of public characters. Powers' outstanding talent has helped to make the Journal the most interesting evening newspaper in America.



He writes the story of the stars and tells it fascinatingly every day in the Evening Journal. His mail exceeds that of any other contributor. He treats authoritatively on the science of astronomy, yet captures and holds the attention of the reader who has no technical knowledge of the subject. Thousands of students of the heavens above follow his daily writings in the New York Evening Journal.



She is outstanding among the highest paid women writers of newspaper serials in America. Being the wife of a famous newspaper man she has a keen understanding of what the newspaper reader seeks in fiction. Her novels such as: "Hollywood Girl," "Money Love" and "Gilded Kisses" have attracted intense interest among the largest audience of evening newspaper readers in America.



One of the most successful writers of serial stories for newspapers in the country. Author of "Chickie," "Sandy," "Shackled Souls," "Her Fling," "Hearts Aflame" and "Jerry," stories that depict life and fire the imagination. All of these have appeared in the New York Evening Journal—more are expected. Elenore Meherin's fiction grips and holds reader interest from first to last installment.



One of the foremost authorities on the game of bridge. He "plays" a game every day in the columns of the Evening Journal and writes with such clarity that experts and novices alike understand. Tens of thousands of bridge fans read his column daily. Thousands of Bridge Games throughout New York and suburbs are played nightly according to Wilbur C. Whitehead's "Sound Auction Bridge" which appears in the New York Evening Journal.



Countless thousands of homes in Metropolitan New York "tune-in" daily to New York Evening Journal Radio Programmes. Tens of thousands "listen-in" to broadcasts by Ruth Mason, cooking expert; Rose Pelswick, Motion Picture Editor; and an incomparable array of professional entertainers and educators. Radio fans follow the radio news and programmes arranged by Margaret Santry every day in the New York Evening Journal.



Victor of 1928 Olympia Fields tournament, notable for the spectacular 36-hole play-off, in which Johnny defeated the great Bobby Jones. Farrell, former caddie on the Westchester links, famous professional and a master tutor of the "ancient and honorable" game tells Evening Journal readers how to improve their golf. New York golfers follow the champion's expert advice exclusively in the Evening Journal.



Women's interest in sports is fast approaching that held by men. Miss Orcutt knows her golf and writes authoritatively about the game, about women in golf, and other women's sports. Women in New York and throughout the suburbs follow Maureen Orcutt's articles on golf regularly in the Evening Journal. Miss Orcutt has the unique distinction of being able to write as well as she plays championship golf.



Prima Donna of the Metropolitan Opera Company, and herself one of the most beautiful women in America, Mme. Jeritza tells Evening Journal readers her secrets of beauty. She has studied the art of creating and preserving beauty and writes authoritatively. Being a highly cultured and professionally successful woman her great aim is to render a service of helpfulness to the greatest possible number of women.



Mrs. Beeckman is one of America's greatest authorities on the customs and usages of good society. Thousands of substantial, serious-minded men and women write to her about the proper thing to do or say in a given situation. She renders an invaluable service to Evening Journal readers. Her frank advice and suggestions are widely read in the columns of this newspaper each and every day.



One of America's few artists with the rare gift of imagining the situation she draws as well as the sentiments of those who look at it. Dorothy Flack's charming girls have an irresistible fascination for Evening Journal readers. She stands second only to the famous Nell Brinkley and the drawings of both these distinguished artists appear on the Magazine Page in the New York Evening Journal.



Dr. Reed is one of America's most distinguished medical men—he writes authoritatively about the ills to which human kind is heir, also of the psychology of health and sickness. His writings have a big following among women readers of the Evening Journal—their welfare and that of their children comprise a great part of his suggestions on health. He is the Health Counselor in Evening Journal homes.



Sporting news with a punch! Experts to write about and report each branch of sports. Those are the cardinal principles which guide New York's greatest Sports Editor. Farnsworth, noted reporter himself, has covered all the outstanding sporting events in recent years. His word story of the "Battle of the Century," the World's Series or the Army and Navy Gridiron Classic is as thrilling as the event itself.



Experts throughout the Sporting World say "TAD" is the greatest sporting cartoonist of all time. "INDOOR" and "OUTDOOR SPORTS" put "T.A.D." in a class by himself. He has originated more slang phrases which have attained national popularity than any other American. These pungent contributions to the colloquial native language have made "T.A.D." beloved by over two million Journal readers.



The "Sports" column by "Bill" Corum is the best of its kind on any Sports Page in America. "Bill" knows his sports. He gives Evening Journal readers the facts plus inimitable observations. His puns, wisecracks and reverse English season the day's sporting dish. Nearly half of all the men and women who buy any New York evening paper buy the Evening Journal daily—and "Bill" Corum alone is a good reason.



Superior all-around writers are as rare as the same kind of athletes. Sid Mercer, President of the New York Sports Writers' Association, combines the unique faculty of being an authoritative critic in all lines of sports. His account of a major boxing contest is the next best thing to having a ringside seat. Evening Journal readers know this and get their ringside views from Sid for every important boxing event.



He takes the motive back of the day's news for his text and makes his pictures preach a powerful sermon. With unerring skill he packs the "cause and effect" of a lifetime story into a single drawing. He is equally gifted in portraying the serious or humorous side of any big news or sports event. The New York Evening Journal is Coffman's pulpit. He addresses the largest congregation of evening newspaper readers in America through the Evening Journal.



Former collegiate athletic star. Captained Columbia Varsity Elevens 1901-04. Selected for "All-American" honors. Coached at Virginia, Fordham, Stevens, Manhattan, Columbia and New York University. Umpire in Yale-Harvard, Harvard-Princeton, Army-Navy, Penn-Cornell and Army-Yale games. Only Racing Expert with knowledge of training methods. His selections most widely read of any writer on turf affairs in New York newspapers.



"Gene Tunney is a worthy model for manly youth," says Rev. Francis P. Duffy, famous fighting chaplain of the old 69th Regiment. The strength of his talks, writings and example is the fact that he lives up to the rules of clean living and good sportsmanship. New York's boys and young men read Gene Tunney's articles regularly in the Evening Journal. He tells them how to strengthen their bodies and keep in robust health.



Travels with the YANKEES—writes about them for Evening Journal readers throughout the season. His pen pictures of big sporting events are said to be "better than a photograph, as impressive and stirring as big news." "When it's slugged by Ford C. Frick, it's a knockout." That accounts for the host of men and women readers who look for his writings daily in the Sports Pages of the New York Evening Journal.



A sporting event of international interest—the Olympic Games—covered for Evening Journal readers by the famous athlete and crack sprinter, Charley Paddock. His wide acquaintance among notable athletes and knowledge of athletics in general give him an insight into every branch of sports. Experts to report each and every branch of sports—that is the reason Evening Journal Sports Pages are so well read.



Practically lives with the GIANTS throughout the baseball season. His play by play reports of each game give Evening Journal readers everything but the applause. Acknowledged expert on boxing, covers the big fights and officiates as radio announcer in giving the blow by blow description. "Buck" O'Neill is a sporting writer with the PUNCH on the diamond, at the "mike" and in the "ring."



He follows the "ROBINS" and reports every game and every play for Evening Journal readers. Schumacher's vivid descriptions of baseball plays bring the real thrills of the game right into New York Evening Journal homes. Countless thousands of Brooklynites who root for the "ROBINS," and follow every play and every game, depend on Garry Schumacher's reports in the Evening Journal.



The man who has won more pennants than any man in baseball, writes signed articles on the game for Evening Journal readers. He is unquestionably the leading authority on the subject. McGraw packs in 50,000 fans at the Polo Grounds but writes for nearly half of all the men and women who buy any New York evening newspaper—that's the half who read the Evening Journal in preference to other evening papers.



His writings in the Evening Journal are the most sensational, humorous additions to the present era of American literature. Recognized among humorous writers of the country as the "greatest giggle generator," "the liveliest laugh laureate" and "the champion chuckle cannonader." Medbury's humor, under the title of "Maybe I'm Wrong," appears in the New York Evening Journal daily.



Cartoonists, artists, humorists, authors, producers ... all are unanimous in voting "Krazy Kat" and "Ignatz the Mouse" headliners among comics. A cat ... a mouse ... a brick ... a dog "cop" ... these are the whimsical characters that have made Herriman a billionaire in laughs. Evening Journal readers are not afraid to laugh ... they have made "Krazy Kat" a member of the family.



"Kayo Tortoni" is acknowledged the most famous woman character in sports cartoons. She enters every branch of athletics and leads the vogue in sports togs. Joe McGurk's fascinating portrayals of Kayo's sporting proclivities put the "Oh!" into Evening Journal's sports pages. McGurk's cartoons of boxing contests are looked forward to by a host of boxing fans.



Known to millions as the creator of "Abie the Agent." His latest contribution is "Broadway Unlimited." Will Rogers, Tad, Roxy, Ziegfeld, and a multitude of Broadway's "Leading Lights" say it is "THE BEST COLUMN" in New York. Hershfield knows New York and New York knows Hershfield through the columns of the New York Evening Journal.



It is because Ad Carter's uproarious little characters are so genuinely "Just Kids"—real kids—the kind you grew up with—that "Just Kids" captivates the hearts of young and old alike. Ad Carter's "Just Kids" recently accomplished a great work in teaching kiddies to play safe, to look before you cross—think how that pleases mothers and fathers! 413,743 boys and girls joined the "Just Kids" Safety Club.

413,743

BOYS and GIRLS

JOINED

"JUST KIDS"

SAFETY CLUB

The "Just Kids" Safety Club idea was originated by Ad Carter, the Evening Journal's famous cartoonist and creator of the daily comic strip entitled "Just Kids."

Each boy and girl cut the application blank from the Evening Journal, filled it in, giving name, address, age, proposed by parent or adult and endorsed by boy or girl friend.

The sole purpose of this constructive work was to prevent accidents, save lives, make "Kids" more careful.

Every club member was cautioned to: "Remember to look up and down before crossing the street."

A total of 413,743 applications to the "Just Kids" Safety Club were received and every member obtained a "Just Kids" Safety Club button.



One of America's best known and most popular cartoonists. Famous for the ludicrous "Boob McNutt," the most foolish "Foolish Questions" and his involved mechanisms for doing simple things. Rube Goldberg's host of admirers throughout New York City and suburbs look forward to his latest comic creation, "Bobo Baxter," appearing in the Evening Journal daily. Goldberg is a comic star of the first magnitude.



Who hasn't heard about "Pa" and "Ma" and "Polly" and "Neewah"? This comic has an appeal for every member of the family. Evening Journal readers get hearty chuckles out of the predicaments of the "Hon. Pa" and his comeback to "Ma" ... they enjoy the prancings of the modern Polly and watch Neewah's futile attempts to save Pa from the wrath of the women. It's a classic among "family" comics.



"Jerry" is the brightest, wittiest, snappiest and most clever of all OFFICE BOYS. Hoban keeps "Jerry" on the job and his job is to make folks laugh. In this respect "Jerry" is the most efficient office boy in America—and Evening Journal readers know it. Hoban's "Jerry on the Job" has attracted a multitude of admirers and they find their favorite comic in their favorite evening paper six days a week.



Trim little, pert little, chic Dumb Dora attracts a world of interest among Evening Journal readers. She is "not so dumb" and that's where the fun comes in. Men like "Dora" because she is clever. Women like "Dora" because she has charm and sense and is always good for a delicious laugh. Dora reflects the dash and independence of modern day flappers for Evening Journal readers in New York City and suburbs.



Verdier's cartoons tell a story chock-full of exciting interest for the kiddies. Boys, girls and wee tots gather 'round the Evening Journal comic page every evening intensely absorbed in the continued story of the adventures of "Little Annie Rooney." Verdier's comic strip grips and holds juvenile interest week in and week out the year around in the Evening Journal.



A comic artist with a keen sense of news! He draws a daily strip for Evening Journal readers giving them a humorous view of current happenings. McGill has created something NEW in cartoons—no comic strip in American newspapers is comparable to it. Evening Journal readers get a "big kick" out of McGill's "Journalisms" because each drawing is up to the last minute in news interest.



Past master in creating the comic strip with a side-splitting wallop. Segar's inspirations are light, frivolous humor based on some ridiculous suggestion. The "Thimble Theatre" in the Evening Journal plays to the largest audience of evening newspaper readers in America. That means nearly half of all the people in New York who buy any New York evening newspaper.



He tells a Scotch story every day in the Evening Journal. This world-famous wit and comedian has a multitude of friends and admirers in New York. They look forward to "Hae ye heard this one?" every day in their favorite news paper. Sir Harry has a big following in the theatre. His Evening Journal audience in single file would reach from New York to Indianapolis.



HOME JOURNAL

the complete magazine section, printed in colors, published every Saturday and sold with the regular issue of the New York Evening Journal at 5c a copy.

The Home Journal, with its all-star cast of writers and contributors is looked forward to and thoroughly read in the greatest number of worth while homes throughout New York City and suburbs.

The New York Evening Journal is a FAMILY INSTITUTION. Men, women and children read the Evening Journal day in and day out. Saturday is no exception. The circulation of the New York Evening Journal on Saturdays at 5c a copy averages greater than on other days of the week when it sells at 3c a copy.



Called the de Maupassant of modern short story writers ... movie scenarist ... witty contributor to books of American Comedies ... expert and thoroughly experienced newspaper man, Jack Lait makes the Home Journal (Saturday Magazine) the most interesting and best read magazine section published by any evening newspaper in America.



The "Stanlaws Girl" is acknowledged the most beautiful type of feminine America. Stanlaws vies with Ziegfeld in glorifying beauty. His latest creation is a series entitled "Frivolous Flossie" who reflects Stanlaws' studies of society, stage and film beauties. "Frivolous Flossie" delights Evening Journal readers every week on the cover of the Saturday Home Journal. She outrivals Paris in a daring display of fashion.



Great artists and sculptors declare Miss Huddleston one of America's most beautiful women. She was one of the original exponents of eurythmic exercises. Her articles tell and show Evening Journal readers how physical culture, beauty and charm of personality and bearing may be developed. Miss Huddleston's host of admirers follow her articles regularly in the Saturday Home Journal.



The constantly increasing number of divorce cases among the elite is a subject of intense interest to men and women in all substantial walks of life. Eleanor Town, a keen student of social science, analyzes the cause of prominent marital dissolutions, points to the solution and tells the facts interestingly for Evening Journal readers every Saturday in the Home Journal.



THE HOUSEHOLD PAGE

BY "GOOD HOUSEKEEPING" INSTITUTE

In their fully equipped modern laboratories the latest inventions in household devices are tested by scientifically trained men and women

Every issue of the Saturday Home Journal contains a page contributed by experts associated with the internationally recognized Good Housekeeping Institute. This feature gives Evening Journal readers authoritative articles on home economics, domestic science and other subjects of direct interest to housewives. New household devices that have been scientifically tested, new cooking methods evolved to save time and labor, recipes that are thoroughly tested and standardized—such vital information is carried into Evening Journal homes through the Saturday Home Journal.

The HOUSEHOLD PAGE contains luncheon and dinner menus for each day of the week, recipes tested in the Institute's Kitchens and valuable helps on marketing.



The Dominant Position of the

NEW YORK EVENING JOURNAL

in the New York Market

CITY & SUBURBAN CIRCULATIONS

NEW YORK EVENING NEWSPAPERS

STANDARD SIZE

A.B.C. Publishers' Statement for 6 months Ending March 31, 1928

THE LOCAL CIRCULATION OF THE NEW YORK EVENING JOURNAL IS

356,903 More than the Evening World 377,410 More than the Evening Sun 443,451 More than the Evening Telegram 575,231 More than the Evening Post



Nearly half of the worthwhile families who buy any standard New York Evening Newspaper buy the New York Evening Journal



8 Points of Leadership

Among New York Evening Newspapers

1. TOTAL CIRCULATION—the New York Evening Journal has more than double the circulation of the next standard size evening paper and more than the next two combined, plus over 80,000 copies a day!

2. CITY CIRCULATION—the Evening Journal's City Circulation exceeds the city circulation of the next two standard evening papers combined!

3. BROOKLYN CIRCULATION—the Evening Journal's City Circulation in Brooklyn, Queens and Long Island about equals that of the three Brooklyn daily papers combined!

4. UPTOWN NEW YORK CIRCULATION—the Evening Journal sells over 100,000 copies each day in Harlem, Bronx, Washington Heights, Fordham and Westchester County.

5. WESTCHESTER CIRCULATION—in this wealthiest suburban territory in the United States the circulation of the Evening Journal nearly equals that of all other standard size New York evening newspapers combined!

6. LONG ISLAND CIRCULATION—in towns within New York suburban territory the Evening Journal outsells all other New York evening papers combined!

7. NEW JERSEY CIRCULATION—in towns within New Jersey territory the Evening Journal outsells all New York evening papers combined!

8. SUBURBAN CIRCULATION—throughout suburban New York within the fifty-mile shopping area the Evening Journal has more circulation than all other New York evening newspapers combined.



THE RICHEST SALES AREA IN AMERICA

]

Dominated by the

NEW YORK EVENING JOURNAL

The New York Evening Journal is read by the greatest number of men and women in all income groups. It goes into the homes of the high earning and largest spending classes, reaching the worthwhile families throughout New York City and its wealthy suburbs.



OVER 100% AHEAD!

Over one hundred per cent ahead of the next nearest standard newspaper in the evening field for more than twenty-five consecutive years!—that is the circulation record of the New York Evening Journal.

Reader interest in the New York Evening Journal is registered by the number of people who buy it in preference to all other New York evening newspapers. It goes home, stays home and is thoroughly read in the greatest number of worthwhile homes because it is interesting to every member of the family.

This overwhelming public confidence and preference for the New York Evening Journal has made it "America's Greatest Evening Newspaper" and the most productive medium for local and national advertisers.



PUBLIC APPRAISAL

What the Metropolitan New York Public Pays Each Year for New York Standard Size (6-Day) Morning and Evening Newspapers



The Metropolitan New York Public Pays $6,638,915 Annually—at 3c and 5c a Copy—for the New York Evening Journal.



INDEX

The New York Evening Journal has the largest, highest paid and most distinguished staff of editors, reporters, correspondents, experts, writers, artists and contributors of any evening newspaper in America.

PAGE A

ABBOTT, FREDERICK K. I.N.S., Paris 14 ANDERSON, JOHN Dramatic Critic 27 ARMULLER, B.G. Mgr. Photo Studio 5

B

BALLOU, HAROLD I.N.S., Madrid 14 BEECKMAN, MRS. C. Etiquette 41 "BENEDICK, BILLY" Society Editor 19 BORST, RAY I.N.S., Albany 13 BRINKLEY, NELL Artist 30 BRISBANE, ARTHUR Editorial Writer 1 BRONS, W.S. I.N.S., Chicago 13 BURG, COPELAND C. I.N.S., Chicago 13 BURTON, BEATRICE Novelist 34

C

CARTER, AD Comic Artist 60 CHAPLIN, RICHARD I.N.S., New York 13 CHARLTON, FRANK I.N.S., Cable Editor 14 CLARK, KENNETH I.N.S., Washington 13 COFFMAN, HAL Artist 48 CORRESPONDENTS I.N.S. Staff 13 and 14 CORUM, W.M. Sports Writer 46 COUSINS, W.S. Financial Expert 31 CRANE, DR. FRANK Philosopher 18 CURLEY, W.A. Editor 3

D

DEUSS, EDW. L. I.N.S., Moscow 14 DOMINATION Circulation 76 DOUGHERTY, MARY Women's News Editor 15 DURNO, GEO. E. I.N.S., Washington 13

E

EMANUEL, G. I.N.S., Rome 14

F

FARIS, BARRY I.N.S. Gen. News Mgr. 13 FARNSWORTH, W.S. Sports Editor 44 FARRELL, JOHNNY Golf Expert 38 FLACK, DOROTHY Artist 42 FLORY, HARRY R. I.N.S., London 14 FOLEY, ARTHUR Feature Editor 5 FOREIGN NEWS STAFF 13 and 14 FRICK, FORD C. Sports Writer 51

G

GOLDBERG, RUBE Comic Artist 62 GOOD HOUSEKEEPING Household Page 75

H

HARGREAVES, GEO. T. I.N.S. Gen. Bus. Mgr 13 HAWTHORNE, J.F.B. Financial News Editor 5 HERRIMAN, GEO. Comic Artist 57 HERSHFIELD, HARRY Comic Artist 59 HOBAN, WALTER Comic Artist 64 HOFTYZER, ERNEST Food Page Editor 29 HOLMES, GEO. R. I.N.S., Washington 13 HOME JOURNAL Magazine Section 70 HUDDLESTON, JOSEPHINE Beauty Expert 73 HUTCHINSON, W.K. I.N.S., Washington 13

I

INTERNAT'AL NEWS SERVICE 10 and 11 INTERNATIONAL NEWS STAFF 13 and 14 INVESTORS' SERVICE BUREAU Letters Analyzed 23

J

JERITZA, MME. M. Beauty Expert 40 "JUST KIDS" Safety Club 61

K

KATZ, PHILIP Art Editor 5 KERKHOFF, JOHNSTON Ass't City Editor 4 KILGALLEN, JAS. L. I.N.S., New York 13

L

LAIT, JACK Editor Home Journal 71 LAUDER, SIR HARRY Humorist 69 LEADERSHIP Circulation 77 LEONARD, T.C. Make-up Editor 5

M

MAHER, J.F. Radio Editor 5 MASON, FRANK E. I.N.S. General Mgr. 13 "MASON, RUTH" Cooking Expert 24 MEDBURY, JOHN P. Humorist 56 MEHERIN, ELENORE Author 35 MERCER, SID Sports Writer 47

Mc

MCGILL, RAY News Cartoonist 67 MCGRAW, JOHN Contributor 55 MCGURK, JOE Cartoonist 58

N

NEAL, WM. S. I.N.S., Washington 13 NEWS PICTURES The Best 6 NEWS STAFF Local News 8 and 9 NEW YORK MARKET 78

O

O'CONNOR, JAMES Bronx Editor 16 O'NEILL, FRANK (BUCK) Sports Writer 53 ORCUTT, MAUREEN Golf Expert 39

P

PADDOCK, CHARLEY Contributor 52 PELSWICK, ROSE Movie Editor 28 PHOTOGRAPHERS News Staff 8 and 9 POWERS, T.E. Caricaturist 32 PUBLIC APPRAISAL Graphic Chart 80

R

REED, DR. CHAS. Health Expert 43 REPORTERS News Staff 8 and 9 REYNOLDS, H.K. I.N.S. Dir. Foreign Ser. 14 ROBINSON, ELSIE Author 20 ROWLAND, HELEN Humorist 21

S

SANDS, CHAS. W. Brooklyn News Editor 5 SANTRY, MARGARET Radio Program Director 37 SCHUMACHER, GARRY Sports Writer 54 SEGAR Comic Artist 68 SENTNER, DAVID P. I.N.S., New York 13 SERVISS, GARRETT P. Astronomer 33 SPIRO, AMSTER City Editor 4 STACY, N.W. News Picture Editor 5 STAFF CORRESPONDENTS I.N.S. Staff 13 and 14 STANLAWS, PENRYHN Artist 72 STERRETT, CLIFF Comic Artist 63 SULLIVAN, LAWRENCE I.N.S., Washington 13

T

T.A.D. (T.A. DORGAN) Cartoonist 45 THORNBURG, R.S. I.N.S., Washington 13 THORP, TOM Sports Writer 49 TOLISCHUS, OTTO D. I.N.S., Berlin 14 TOWN, ELEANOR Sociologist 74 TUNNEY, GENE Contributor 50

V

VERDIER, EDW. W. Comic Artist 66

W

WALSH, D.J. I.N.S., New York 13 WEBSTER, R. Brooklyn Editor 17 WEIL, IRVING Music Critic 26 WHITEHEAD, W.C. Auction Bridge Expert 36 WILEY, R.H. News Editor 4 WILLIAMS, W. ALBERT Ass't City Editor 4 "WRIGHT, WM." Financial Expert 22

Y

YOUNG, CHIC Comic Artist 65



UNION LABEL ALLIED PRINTING TRADES COUNCIL 27 NEW YORK CITY

THE END

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